seminar report on 3d printing shubham srivastava

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A SeminarReport

On

3D PRINTING

Submitted to

SIR. ANUJ GUPTA

Submitted by

SHUBHAM SRIVASTAVA

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY

InMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERINGIEC Group of InstitutionsGreater Noida (UP) 2013062016 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to all those who helped in making of this seminar. I am grateful to SIR ANUJ GUPTA, for his necessary help in the fulfilment of this seminar. I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude to our seminar coordinator Mrs. RINKU YADAV for their valuable guidance, constant encouragement and creative suggestions on making this seminar.

I am also grateful to all my friends and classmates for helping me to make this seminar.

SHUBHAM SRIVASTAVA

Table Of Contents

1. Introduction- what is 3D printing.................................( i )

2. History of 3D printing..................................................( ii )

3. Sustainable Environment Friendly.............................( iv )

4. 3D Printing Material.....................................................( v )

5. Choosing Printing Inks.................................................( vii )

6. General Principles.......................................................( vii )

7. 3D Printing Application...............................................( xi )

8. Consumers...................................................... ( xv )

9. Advantages........................................................( xvi )

10. Disadvantages................................................( xvi )

11. Glossary...........................................................( xiv )

12. Reference........................................................( xvii )

ABSTRACT

Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, has the potential to vastly accelerate innovation, compress supply chains, minimize materials and energy usage, and reduce waste.Originally developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993. 3D printing technology forms the basis of Z Corporations prototyping process. 3DP technology creates3D physical prototypes by solidifying layers of deposited powder using a liquid binder. By definition 3DP is an extremely versatile and rapid process accommodating geometry of varying complexity in hundreds of different applications, and supporting many types of materials. Z Corp. pioneered the commercial use of 3DP technology, developing 3D printers that leading manufacturers use to produce early concept models and product prototypes. Utilizing 3DP technology, Z Corp. has developed 3D printers that operate at unprecedented speeds, extremely low costs, and within a broad range of applications. This paper describes the core technology and its related applications.Additive manufacturing, often referred to as 3D printing, is a new way of making products and components from a digital model. Like an office printer that puts 2D digital files on a piece of paper, a 3D printer creates components by depositing thin layers of material one after another ,only where required , using a digital blueprint until the exact component has been created.

Interest in additive techniques is growing swiftly as applications have progressed from rapid prototyping to the production of end-use products Additive equipment can now use metals, polymers, composites, or other powders to print a range of functional components, layer by layer, including complex structures that cannot be manufactured by other means.

By eliminating production steps and using substantially less material, additive processes could be able to reduce waste and save more than 50% of energy compared to todays subtractive manufacturing processes, and reduce material costs by up to 90%. The use of additive manufacturing can potentially benefit a wide range of industries including defence, aerospace, automotive, biomedical, consumer products, and metals manufacturing. Introduction What is 3D printing ?

3D Printing is a process for making a physical object from a three-dimensional digital model, typically by laying down many successive thin layers of a material. It brings a digital object (its CAD representation) into its physical form by adding layer by layer of materials.There are several different techniques to 3D Print an object. 3D Printing brings two fundamental innovations: the manipulation of objects in their digital format and the manufacturing of new shapes by addition of material.Digital+Additive ManufacturingTechnology has affected recent human history probably more than any other field. These technologies have made our lives better in many ways, opened up new avenues and possibilities, but usually it takes time, sometimes even decades, before the truly disruptive nature of the technology becomes apparent.Fig (i) simplified process of 3d printingIt is widely believed that 3D printing or additive manufacturing (AM) has the vast potential to become one of these technologies. 3D printing has now been covered across many television channels, in mainstream newspapers and across online resources. What really is this 3D printing that some have claimed will put an end to traditional manufacturing as we know it, revolutionize design and impose geopolitical, economic, social, demographic, environmental and security implications to our every day lives?The most basic, differentiating principle behind 3D printing is that it is an additive manufacturing process. And this is indeed the key because 3D printing is a radically different manufacturing method based on advanced technology that builds up parts, additively, in layers at the sub mm scale. This is fundamentally different from any other existing traditional manufacturing techniques. History of 3D Printing

1980: The Birth of a Technology3d printing story starts in the 1980s. Cumbernauld got its big Hollywood break as the backdropforGregorys Girl,Pac-Mac was busy takingthe world by storm and Taggar started solving crimes in Glasgow. Fig (ii) first 3d printer by MakerBot IndustriesOn the other side of the world,Japans Dr Kodama submitteda patent for Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies. This tech was envisaged asa means to create prototypes faster and is the first glimpse we got of 3D printing.Sadly Dr Kodamaspatent wasnt actuallyfiled because the submission exceeded the one-year deadline.Six years later and 11,000 miles away in South Carolina, 3D printing rears its head again.Chuck Hull invents and patentsthe worldsfirst stereolithography (SLA) rapid prototyping system and founds the now iconic 3D Systems.Stereolithography is the process of building an object in exceedingly thin slices from the ground up. Sort of like stacking a pile of plastic Digestives until youve got a shiny new prototype. Although the SLA technology hasbeen largely supplantedby Selective Laster Sintering (SLS) and Multijet Printing (MJP), itsstillused in somerapid prototyping machinestoday.This is the first proper glimpsewe get at 3D printing.1990: 3D Printing Grows UpWhile 3D Systems patented the first SLA machine during the 1980s, it would take a further six years until the first 3D printerwasactually built. In 1992 3D Systems took their first steps into the practical world of 3D printing and actually built a SLA printer.Their first machine used a UV laser to solidify layers of photopolymer and could gradually build up complex objects over the course of hours.The process was slow and was far from perfect but it was and is ground breaking stuff.At the end of the 90s things began to sound like ascience fictionmovie:scientists began printing human organs. Okay, technically theorganswerent printed but the organ in question a bladder was actually grown around a 3D printed scaffold.Nonetheless, a manmade bladder was grown around a 3D-printed mould and successfully implanted in a person. Its amazing stuff.2000: The Open-Source EraIt was during the 2000s that3D printing technology started to gain popularity and take off in the mainstream. Alot of that success is down to the efforts of a few people who tried to promote open-source versions of the technology..A couple years later 3D printing technology startsto creep into commercial uses. The first3D-printed prosthetic was manufactured in 2008 andDIY printing kitstargeted at kids followed the next year.2010s: How Far Can We Push It?Were only half way through the decade but weve already pushedback the edges of the printing sphere.Engineers at the University of Southampton recently designed and flewthe worlds first 3D-printed aircraft.Despite including traditionally expensive features like elliptical wings, the unmanned aircraft cost a measly 5,000. Such is the benefits of 3D printing technology.The same year, Kor Ecologic introducedthe worlds first 3D-printed car. Well, the body was 3D-printed at least.The ultra-efficient car achieves 200 mpg around four times fuel efficiency of the average modern car.The year after that,Dutch doctors worked with engineers to design a 3D-printed jawfor an 83-year-old women suffering from chronic bone infection. Sustainable / Environmentally Friendly3D printing is also emerging as an energy-efficient technology that can provide environmental efficiencies in terms of both the manufacturing process itself, utilising up to 90% of standard materials, and, therefore, creating less waste, but also throughout an additively m