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  • 5 TIPS TO GUARANTEE YOU GET YOUR PRICING RIGHT

    SHOOTING STILLS FOR BLOCKBUSTING MOVIES

    SONYS 2500 RX1 COMPACT TESTED

    REVEALED! THE FULL COST OF SWITCHING TO FULL FRAME

    BACK TO BLACK (& WHITE)Take mono portraits that sell

    WEDDINGS: THE NEXT GENERATION Forget posing, its all about the emotion!

    ISSUE 79 4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

    In at the deep endDive into Christy Lee Rogers stunning abstract fashion shots

    PRO PORTFOLIO

    How one pro is successful in two very diff erent markets

    MULTIPLEEXPOSURES

    LIGHT BLUE BUSINESS SOFTWARE WORTH 350!WIN

    Top pros share aff ordable ways to give your bottom line a welcome boostBUSINESSKICK-START YOUR PHOTO

    PP79_001 (COVER)rp2hbljc.indd 1 25/3/13 09:28:58

  • 004 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 79

    CONTENTSISSUE 79

    Business MattersPro Academy Gear

    Regulars

    036 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS A project capturing life under the Westway motorway gave Paul Wenham-Clarke some lighting challenges. Heres how he tackled them.

    044 BACK TO BLACK (& WHITE) COVER Damien Lovegrove explains key techniques to create portraits with a lm noir look. It could be just what your clients are looking for!

    052 WEDDINGS: THE NEXT STEP COVER The Beloved Concept is a new approach to wedding photography. We speak to one of the UKs leading exponents of the style to discover what its all about.

    082 THE COST OF FULL FRAME COVER Aside from the obvious outlay for the camera body, what other hidden costs lie in wait for pros moving to the larger format? We nd out.

    092 CANON EOS M & SONY RX1COVER Canons compact system camera and Sonys full-frame compact are well specied and capable of great results, but is that enough to make them good second shooters?

    098 BUYERS GUIDE: MEMORY Memory cards, hard drives and solid state drives we take a look at the lot and hand-pick a selection of manufacturers to consider.

    028 MULTIPLE EXPOSURESCOVER Mark Bridger has carved a successful career as a wedding and a wildlife photographer. Heres how.

    061 BUSINESS MATTERS Want to run your business better? Youll be needing this essential advice from our experts, then.

    064 GET YOUR PRICING RIGHT COVER Its one of our most regularly asked questions: what should I charge? Dont miss this priceless advice.

    070 KICK-START YOUR BUSINESS COVER Looking for an affordable way to boost your business? We asked pros what theyd do with a theoretical 2000.

    006 INBOX Why the recent Focus on Imaging show should give us reasons to be cheerful, plus details on new launches from Bowens, Peli, Sony and more.

    016 PORTFOLIO: JOE ALBLASCOVER We meet the Hollywood star youve probably never heard of, but whose work youll be very familiar with.

    016

    Subscriptions & back issues:

    Find out all about the wedding style that makes posing a thing of the past

    052

    022 PROJECT: IN AT THE DEEP END COVER For stunning abstract fashion images just add water! We showcase the aquatic exploits of Hawaiian-born photographic artist Christy Lee Rogers.

    022

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  • ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 005

    Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge, CB22 3HJ.

    No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

    Cant find a copy? Finding your nearest Photo Professional magazine stockist couldnt be easier. Simply contact: COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QE Alternatively call 01895 433600.

    When you have nished with this magazine, please recycle it

    Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ Telephone 01223 499450 enquiries@bright-publishing.com www.photopromagazine.comeditorialEditor Terry Hope 01959 563007 terryhope@bright-publishing.comTechnical Writer Ian Fyfe 01223 499456 ianfyfe@bright-publishing.comSub Editors Lisa Clatworthy 01223 499450 Hannah Bealey 01223 499450Editorial Director Roger Payne 01223 499460 rogerpayne@bright-publishing.comDesign Director Dean UsherDesign & Production Manager Grant GillardadvertisingSales Director Matt Snow 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.comKey Accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.comMike Elliott 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.comBusiness Development Director Dave Stone 01223 499462 davestone@bright-publishing.comAll advertising copy to: pproads@bright-publishing.compublishingPublishing Directors Andy Brogden & Matt PluckHead of Circulation Chris Haslum

    028

    Cover image Dave Kai Piper Model Chloe Jasmine Whichello

    www.photopromagazine.com, call 01371 851876 or see p90 for our special offer

    082

    PP79_004-005 (CONTENTS)rpljchb.indd 5 25/3/13 15:06:20

  • 016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 78

    PP79_016-021 (PORTFOLIO)hbljc.indd 16 25/3/13 14:21:06

  • PORTFOLIO | JOE ALBLAS

    ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 017

    PORTFOLIO | JOE ALBLAS

    ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 017ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 017

    Joe Alblas has been privileged to document some of the greatest moments of human history, and although he might have been working on a film set at the time, he still had to capture the action live as it happenedWORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES JOE ALBLAS

    PP79_016-021 (PORTFOLIO)hbljc.indd 17 25/3/13 14:21:18

  • PORTFOLIO | JOE ALBLAS

    018 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 79

    I create make believe you were somewhere else images, by using a combination of lighting set-ups, props and locations

    PP79_016-021 (PORTFOLIO)hbljc.indd 18 25/3/13 14:21:42

  • PORTFOLIO | JOE ALBLAS

    ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 019

    he world of film stills is a very different place today than it once was. Forget those glorious, staged Hollywood classics by the likes of George Hurrell and Clarence Sinclair Bull; now its all about realism and images that

    could essentially pass as virtual screen grabs from the movie. Those like South African photographer Joe Alblas, who specialises in this area, need all the razor-sharp reactions of a top photojournalist while being nimble enough to keep out of the way of a constantly moving film crew and cast of actors.

    This is an endlessly challenging and stimulating job, and Joes working day regularly involves being asked to produce stills of epic scenes set up as part of a big budget film or TV production. For example, towards the end of 2011 he spent three months photographing Mankind: The Story of All of Us, a landmark History Channel documentary series. In the process, he found himself confronted by the ice age, the battle of Megiddo, the sacking of Rome, the demise of Easter Island, Christopher Columbuss discovery of America, the Salem witch hunts, plus a host of other key moments from history. It was an extraordinary commission that yielded some amazing images, as the past came vividly to life in front of Joes camera.

    Starting out in the late seventies working part-time as a press photographer for the Sunday newspapers in South Africa, Joe found himself shooting mostly cover stories during the apartheid oppression. Each weekend I would hope to get a front-page spread which would mean extra money, he says, particularly if the image was being used in colour.

    Within a few years he had changed direction, seeking more technically challenging assignments. By chance I took another path, which brought me into advertising and fashion photography, he says. The latter was my preference, and for the next 20 years it allowed me the freedom to express myself through my work. I soon began to develop a technique of creating make believe you were somewhere else images by using a combination of lighting set-ups, props and interesting locations in my approach, similar to how directors today use production designers, art directors and the like to create their movie sets. Basically, this set the foundation for what I now look for in producing all my set images.

    In 2001 I finally moved back to Cape Town and almost immediately started shooting stills on international commercials, and later gravitated more towards long-form film and television drama as Cape Town turned into one of the worlds most popular film-production destinations.

    Shooting the big productionEvery production is different, and usually Joes assignments are long-term and involve him spending weeks, or even months, covering every angle of the action. The style of photography needs to match the look of the film footage, and its important for the approach to be tailored to fit the occasion.

    I always look first at who is directing, says Joe, and study the treatments, then Ill look at who is doing the cinematography to see the style. Next I have

    IMAGES Fast shutter speeds and a housing for the camera are vital to capturing stills, quickly and quietly, on a movie set. Working closely with the director of photography lets Joe Alblas plan his shots without getting under the teams busy feet. His stills are of huge importance but hes more of a voyeur on-set for scenes, such as the explosion above, hes expected to work alongside the film crew to capture the same moment.

    T

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