I Have Understood You, Boss

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  • Sahitya Akademi

    I Have Understood You, BossAuthor(s): Vasdev Mohi and Mohan GehaniSource: Indian Literature, Vol. 47, No. 1 (213) (January-February, 2003), pp. 10-12Published by: Sahitya AkademiStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23341697 .Accessed: 24/06/2014 22:54

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  • tired, dead tired

    flings himself on the bed

    Tutii is all aglow

    Katnli's and Binu's heartbeats rise

    Ramio, Nathu and Kalu

    have not yet returned

    it is a police case.

    Tinu and Jagu enter together: "We were late

    on the way in a lane

    a video film was showing it was full of action

    full of violence

    we thoroughly enjoyed it."

    Kamli and Binu raised their hands

    with sticks in them

    to beat thembut, no!

    instantly they embraced them.

    "You vagabond! We were dead with worry."

    Drums reverberate in the slum.

    The next day in the morning Tinu, Jagu and Bikhoo

    get up as usual

    and get ready.

    Translated from Sindhi by Mohan Gehani

    I Have Understood You, Boss

    Your jeep was very fast

    my run a mere apology but I did not rest

    10 / Indian Literature : 213

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  • somewhere you will pitch your tent

    I knew for certain.

    I will free my 'poem' from

    your bewitching silken snares

    and go back.

    I was mistaken

    every dacoit is Valmiki

    so I thought.

    Switch on lights I do not want to see

    your drama of blood and gore I do not want to listen

    to the tales of Mahabharat

    'it is sacred duty to spill blood of

    your very own.'

    I do not accept this.

    You very well know the result of a fight between a peacock and python yet you bring both into the ring and enjoy the sport this is the apparent face of

    your hidden weakness the entire staff of your court has started in killer trucks to chase those who dared to look you into

    your eyes and speak to you I understand your snap justice still my eyes do not look down.

    I have a gambler's nature

    after every defeat I increase the stakes

    by very nature

    today I am in confrontation with you. I have confidence in self

    Vasdev Mohi /II

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  • you have confidence in your pistol once again we are in the ring

    peacock and python.

    Translated from Sindhi by Mohan Gehani

    Meal

    Tuni removed things from one corner of the hut

    to another;

    took cleaned utensils

    to the Municipal tap to clean again. Quarrelled with Kamli

    came home

    started smearing her hearth with mud once again for the third time

    Now children started

    crying in chorus

    'Ma ! give us food'

    Tuni said 'just.... just'

    It is the thirteenth day since the factory is locked out.

    Translated from Sindhi by Mohan Gehani

    12 / Indian Literature : 213

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    Article Contentsp. 10p. 11p. 12

    Issue Table of ContentsIndian Literature, Vol. 47, No. 1 (213) (January-February, 2003), pp. 1-200Front MatterFROM THE EDITOR'S DESK [pp. 5-8]POETRYLiving [pp. 9-10]I Have Understood You, Boss [pp. 10-12]Meal [pp. 12-12]The Horses Were Not Aware [pp. 13-14]Shapes Beyond Meaning [pp. 14-15]Children Gazing At Snow-caps [pp. 15-17]Dialogue [pp. 17-17]What I'm Born Out Of [pp. 17-18]Caress [pp. 19-19]Offspring [pp. 19-20]The Crying of Two Cats [pp. 20-20]Existence [pp. 21-21]Activities [pp. 21-22]On That Point [pp. 22-22]Fire [pp. 23-23]Creator [pp. 23-24]Enclosure [pp. 25-26]To Walk on the Feet Mattered Most [pp. 26-27]Dying Declaration [pp. 27-27]Shattered Pride [pp. 28-29]Conversation with Children [pp. 30-31]Smile [pp. 31-31]The Sunrays Are Fading [pp. 32-33]My Lost Habitation [pp. 33-33]The Home of Happiness [pp. 33-34]Detached Eye [pp. 34-35]Open Your Eyes, O' Beautiful One [pp. 35-35]Posthumous [pp. 36-37]Radha [pp. 38-38]The Mermaid [pp. 39-39]Lullaby to My Country [pp. 39-39]Women in Black [pp. 40-40]The Martyr [pp. 40-41]The Lotus [pp. 41-41]To Whomsoever it may Concern [pp. 42-43]

    STORYTIMEThe Museum [pp. 44-62]Still Waters of the Interior [pp. 63-69]The Silver Pickle Dish [pp. 70-75]Who Can Measure the Loneliness of the Longest Train on Earth [pp. 76-78]The Shadow [pp. 79-95]

    PLAYThe Wolf Man [pp. 96-134]

    INTERVIEWTo Life, Eagerly.... [pp. 135-137]N.P. Mohamed in Conversation with A.J. Thomas [pp. 138-150]

    LITERARY CRITICISMMasks in "Fury": A Study of Indian Authors' Destination [pp. 151-160]Being and Role-playing: Reading Girish Karnad's "Tughlaq" [pp. 161-173]Tradition, Modernity and The Landscapes of Belief and Ritual: Nirmal Verma's "The Burning Bough" and U.R. Anantha Murthy's "Why Not Worship in the Nude?" [pp. 174-184]

    IN MEMORIAMAnnadasankar's Literary-Achievements [pp. 185-190]People's Dramatist, Gopal Chhotray: A Tribute [pp. 191-196]

    Our Contributors [pp. 197-200]Back Matter