FLHS School Climate Report 2013

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The Comprehensive School Climate InventoryMeasuring the Climate for LearningPrepared for Fairfield Ludlowe High School, December 2012

The CSCI has been developed by the National School Climate Center (NSCC) schoolclimate.org

Adapt this school climate report to meet your needs:If you need to see a simple overview of your survey results: Reviewtheresponse ratesfor yourschoolonpages 8-9. Also lookatthedemographic graphs on pages 137 - 145 . Identifyanyunder-represented populationsordemographicgroups, andkeepthisinmindasyouread. Besureyouunderstandthe dimensions of school climate, as measuredbytheCSCI.Seepage 5 foranexplanation. Lookatthesummary graphs on pages 12-19toseehoweachgroup perceivesthedimensionsofclimatein yourschool. Lookattherelative rankingsforeach schoolgrouponpages 18-19, and seehowtheycompareacrossgroups. Lookforareas rated negatively byoneormoregroups,aswellas dimensions that are ranked very differentlybydifferentgroups. Thesecouldsignalareasthatneed attention.Reviewtheguidelines for improvement on pages - to begin workingtowardschoolclimate change.

If you need an in-depth look at your survey results:Reviewtheoverviewinformationinthe left-handcolumn. Togetafullerpictureoftherange of perceptionswithineachschoolgroup abouteachdimension,lookatthe scoredistributionsinGroup Rating and Rankings on pages 11-13. On pages 24-45,youcanseegraphs foreachgrouporganized by school climate dimension. On pages 47-55, the same graphs are organized by school group (all studentgraphstogether,etc.). Examinehowdifferentsub-groups withineachschoolgroupviewed thevariousdimensionsbeginning on page 56.Thisshowsdifferent perceptionsbasedongender,grade, race/ethnicity,and(forschool personnel)yearsofexperience.

If you need a detailed examination of your survey results: Reviewtheoverviewinformationin theleft-handcolumn,andthein-depth informationinthecentercolumn. Readcarefullythroughtheentire reportthere are additional graphs thatarenotidentifiedintheothertwo columns.Detailedexplanationsand guidingquestionsareincludednextto each graph. Onpages 105- 136, youllfinda detailed breakdownofhoweach grouprespondedtoeach individual survey item.Thesearegroupedby schoolclimatedimension,soyou canseeexactlywhichsurveyitems madeupeachdimension.Thefull text of the itemisincluded,aswell asachartshowingthepercentage ofrespondentsfromthatgroup whogaveeachofthefivepotential responses,ordidnotrespondatall.

Note:thisdatawillonlybeshown whentherearesufficientnumbersto guaranteeanonymityforrespondents.

Note:Thesurveywasdeveloped to be most reliableatthelevelof climatedimensions,ratherthanitemby-item.Therefore,NSCCdoesnot recommendmakingdecisionsbased on this data alone.CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

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Report ContentsI. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4TheDimensionsofSchoolClimate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 C. Sub-groupRatings Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 SchoolPersonnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Parents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

II. School Climate Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7SchoolVoice:ResponseRates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 GroupRatingsandRankings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

IV. Recommended Guidelines and Resources. . . . . . . .81ProcessRecommendations: HowtoDoItandWheretoStart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

III. In-Depth Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21A. SchoolClimateDimensions SafetyRulesandNorms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 SenseofPhysicalSecurity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 SenseofSocial-EmotionalSecurity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 SupportforLearning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 SocialandCivicLearning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 RespectforDiversity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 SocialSupportAdults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 SocialSupportStudents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 SchoolConnectedness/Engagement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 PhysicalSurroundings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Leadership(SchoolPersonnel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ProfessionalRelationships(SchoolPersonnel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 B. ComparativeRatingPatternsAcrossDimensions Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 SchoolPersonnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Parents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

V. Action Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85PhysicalSafety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Social-EmotionalSafety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 SupportforLearning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 SocialandCivicLearning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 RespectforDiversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 SocialSupportAdults&Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 98 SchoolConnectedness/Engagement............ PhysicalSurroundings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 LeadershipandProfessionalRelationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

VI. Detailed Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ScaleScoresbyGroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 SurveyResponses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 DemographicProfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Appendix A: FurtherDetailsontheCSCIMeasure . . . . . . . .147

The Comprehensive School Climate Inventory (CSCI). Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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I. IntroductionWhat is school climate? Schoolclimatereferstothequalityofschoollifeasitrelatestonormsandvalues,interpersonalrelationsandsocial interactions,andorganizationalprocessesandstructures. Theschoolclimatesetsthetoneforallthelearningandteachingdoneintheschoolenvironment,andispredictiveof studentsabilitytolearnanddevelopinhealthyways. Allschools,likeallpeople,havearangeofstrengthsandweaknesses,aswellasadistinctivevisionforthekindof school they aspire to be.

Measuring school climate: the CSCI TheCSCI(ComprehensiveSchoolClimateInventory)isascientificallydevelopedsurveybasedonresearchandtheory definingwhatcontributestopositiveclimatesforlearning. TheCSCImeasuresthesharedperceptionsoftheschoolcommunityandrevealshowthepopulationswhose perceptionsweremeasured(e.g.students,schoolpersonnel,andparents)feelabouttheschoolenvironment.

Who developed the CSCI? TheCSCIwasdevelopedbytheNationalSchoolClimateCenter(NSCC),anon-profitorganizationdedicatedto measuringandimprovingtheclimateforlearninginschools.NSCCsmissionistohelpschoolsintegratecrucial social,emotional,andethicallearningwithacademicinstructiontoenhancestudentperformance,preventdropouts, reduceviolence,anddevelophealthyandpositivelyengagedadults.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

I. IntroductionThe 12 Dimensions of School Climate Measured by the CSCIDimensions Safety1 Rules and Norms 2 Sense of Physical Security 3 Sense of Social-Emotional Security

Major IndicatorsClearly communicated rules about physical violence; clearly communicated rules about verbal abuse, harassment, and teasing; clear and consistent enforcement and norms for adult intervention. Sense that students and adults feel safe from physical harm in the school. Sense that students feel safe from verbal abuse, teasing, and exclusion.

Teaching and Learning4 Support for Learning 5 Social and Civic LearningUse of supportive teaching practices, such as: encouragement and constructive feedback; varied opportunities to demonstrate knowledge and skills; support for risk-taking and independent thinking; atmosphere conducive to dialog and questioning; academic challenge; and individual attention. Support for the development of social and civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions including: effective listening, conflict resolution, self-reflection and emotional regulation, empathy, personal responsibility, and ethical decision making.

Interpersonal Relationships6 Respect for Diversity 7 Social SupportAdults 8 Social SupportStudentsMutual respect for individual differences (e.g. gender, race, culture, etc.) at all levels of the schoolstudent-student; adult-student; adult-adult and overall norms for tolerance. Pattern of supportive and caring adult relationships for students, including high expectations for students success, willingness to listen to students and to get to know them as individuals, and personal concern for students problems. Pattern of supportive peer relationships for students, including: friendships for socializing, for problems, for academic help, and for new students.

Institutional Environment9 School Connectedness/Engagement 10 Physical SurroundingsPositive identification with the school and norms for broad participation in school life for students, staff, and families. Cleanliness, order, and appeal of facilities and adequate resources and materials.

Staff Only11 Leadership 12 Professional RelationshipsAdministration that creates and communicates a clear vision, and is accessible to and supportive of school staff and staff development. Positive attitudes and relationships among school staff that support effectively working and learning together.

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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I. IntroductionGoals for this ReportThe report will show you: Howsurveyedmembersofyourschoolcommunitystudents, school personnel and parentsrate each dimension ofschoolclimate. Whichdimensionsofschoolclimateareperceivedbyeachgroupasgenerallypositive, negative, or neutral. Whichdimensionsareratedhighest and lowestforeachgroupasawhole. Thedistribution of rating patternsforindividualswithineachgroupforeverydimensionsothatyoucanseethe range of responsesfromnegativetopositive. Where perceptions are consistentacrossthethreeschoolgroupsstudents,schoolpersonnelandparentsand where they diverge.

In reading through this report: 1. Youwillseethatsimilar information is presented in a variety of ways. Ifonegraphorchartdoesnotseemto capturetheinformationyoufeelismostimportant,adifferentpartofthereportmayprovidewhatyouneed. 2. Lookingatresultsisoftenaquestionofpeelingbacklayersofinformation.Itisimportanttoprogress from overall summary to more detailed resultsinordertogetafullpicture.Lookingatresultsatonlyonelevelmaybe misleading. 3. Itisimportanttounderstandthattherealvalueinthedataisthedegreetowhichtheinformationbecomesa catalystfordiscussion,deeperinquiry,andaction.Thereportwillpresentthefindingsforyourschoolandtrytohelp youunderstandhowtoexamineandinterpretthemtoaid the process of inquiry and discussion.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewThis overview sectionwillgiveyouasnapshotofwho responded to the survey,aswellasfeedbackonthe wayeachschoolgroupperceivesyourschoolclimatein the broadest termsbased on median scale scores for each dimension of school climate.Itwillalsogiveyouan overviewoftheamountofvariationwithineachgroups perceptionsofthesetendimensions. To help you interpret this feedback, results are presented: 1. as scores that can be considered positive, negative and neutral 2. in rank orderfromthehighesttolowestrated dimensions 3. as comparative profilestohelpyouunderstandhow each groupperceivestherangeofdimensionsand howeach dimensionisperceivedacrossthedifferent groups

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewSchool Voice: Response RatesWhy is this important? Oneofthemostimportantattributesofthissurveyisitsabilitytoreflecttheperceptionsofthedistinctpopulations whoweresurveyed----students,schoolpersonnelandparents.Therefore,itisimportanttoknowhowmany membersofeachgroupresponded.

How to look at this data: Itisnot unusual to see the lowest response rates for parents,astheyarefurtherremovedfromschoollifethan studentsorschoolpersonnel. Thesurveyresultsaremostvaluablewhentheycapturetheperceptionsofallschoolcommunitymembers,andlow response rates should be addressed. IntheDetailedResultssection,thereisademographic profileofrespondentsinallthreegroups.Inadditionto consideringtheoverallresponserate,itisrecommendedthatyoulookattheprofileofrespondentscompared to yourschoolprofile.Totheextentthatrespondentsforeachgroupdonotmirrortheschoolscomposition, the voice you are hearing may be skewed.Youshouldkeepthisinmindandmakeanefforttoreachouttogroupsthat appeartohavebeenunder-represented. Thisisespeciallyimportantifthesurveyresultsindicatethatdifferentsub-groupsexperiencetheschoolinvery differentways,whichyoucanseeinSectionIII.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewSchool Voice: Response Rates

GroupStudents School Personnel Parents

Population Size1562* 213* 1290*

# Respondents1418 164 545

% of Population Represented90.78% 77.00% 42.25%

*Figures received from school to represent potential number of respondents.

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewGroup Ratings and RankingsWhy is this important? Thesechartsallowyoutoseehoweachgroupratesthedimensionsofschoolclimate,aswellasthevariabilityof opinionwithineachgroup.

How to look at this data: Inthecentercolumn,youllseethemedianscalescoreforeachoftherelevantdimensionsthatcontributetooverall school climate. Themedian score is the midpointofthedistributionofscalescoresfortheindividualsinthisgroup.Itshouldgive youanunderstandingofhowthegroupas a whole perceives each dimension. Youllalsoseethateachbariscolorcodedintothreesectionsfromdarkesttolightest.Inlookingattheresults, itisimportanttounderstandnotjusthowthegroupasawholeperceivesthisdimension,butalsotherangeand distributionofopinionwithineachgroup. Thecolorcodingrepresentsthepercentageofindividualsineachgroupwhosescalescoresfallintothreeranges: negative(3.5)andneutral(2.5-3.5).

Note: How were these dimension scores obtained from the survey responses, and how were negative, neutral, and positive scores identified? Asyoumayrememberfromthesurveyitself,possibleresponsesrangedfrom1(themostnegative)to5(themost positive).Eachofthesurveyitemsislinkedtooneparticulardimensionofschoolclimate.Foreachdimension,we giveeachindividualrespondentascalescorebasedonanaverageofhisorherresponsestothoseparticular items.Inordertoobtainanoverallsenseofthegroupsperceptionofaparticulardimension,wefoundthemedianof alltheindividualscalescores.The median is a midpointthere are equal numbers of scores below and above the median. Tohelpyouinterpretthescores,wevegroupedthemaccordingtothe5-pointscalefromtheoriginalsurvey. Anyindividualdimensionscoresbelow2.5wereconsiderednegative,anyscoresabove3.5wereconsideredpositive, andanyscoresbetween2.5and3.5wereconsideredneutral.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewGroup Ratings and Rankings

Median Scores and Rating Patterns StudentsDimension SafetyRules and Norms Physical Security Social - Emotional Security 3.83 4.00 3.00 5% 3% 21% 25% 53%

Median 33.3%32%

Score Distribution 33.3%63% 77% 22%

33.3%

Teaching and LearningSupport for Learning Social and Civic Learning 3.50 2.89 8% 26% 47% 57% 45% 17%

Interpersonal RelationshipsRespect for Diversity Social Support Adults Social Support Students School Connectedness Engagement Physical Surroundings 3.75 3.63 3.80 4% 5% 5% 36% 38% 28% 60% 58% 67%

Institutional Environment3.50 3.67 5% 6% 45% 39% 50% 55%

= % of individual ratings in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5 - point scale) = % of individual ratings in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5 - point scale) = % of individual ratings in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5 - point scale)

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewGroup Ratings and Rankings

Median Scores and Rating Patterns School PersonnelDimension SafetyRules and Norms Physical Security Social - Emotional Security 4.33 4.40 3.67 2% 8% 2% 36% 7%

Median 33.3%

Score Distribution 33.3%91% 92% 62%

33.3%

Teaching and LearningSupport for Learning Social and Civic Learning 4.15 3.90 4% 1% 29% 97% 70%

Interpersonal RelationshipsRespect for Diversity Social Support Adults Social Support Students School Connectedness Engagement Physical Surroundings 4.00 4.33 4.00 10% 3% 15% 90% 97% 85%

Institutional Environment4.13 4.00 15% 22% 85% 78%

Working EnvironmentLeadership Professional Relationships 3.77 4.10 8% 11% 30% 89% 63%

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= % of individual ratings in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5 - point scale) = % of individual ratings in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5 - point scale)

CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewGroup Ratings and Rankings

Median Scores and Rating Patterns ParentsDimension SafetyRules and Norms Physical Security Social - Emotional Security 3.83 4.20 3.33 3% 2% 8% 14% 47%

Median 33.3%32%

Score Distribution 33.3%66% 89% 39%

33.3%

Teaching and LearningSupport for Learning Social and Civic Learning 3.50 3.33 9% 7% 41% 54% 50% 39%

Interpersonal RelationshipsRespect for Diversity Social Support Adults Social Support Students School Connectedness Engagement Physical Surroundings 3.75 3.75 3.80 2% 4% 4% 38% 36% 28% 60% 60% 68%

Institutional Environment3.75 3.83 7% 3% 29% 25% 65% 72%

= % of individual ratings in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5 - point scale) = % of individual ratings in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5 - point scale) = % of individual ratings in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5 - point scale)

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewWhy is this important? Thischartallowsyoutolookatacomparativeprofileoftheoverall(median)ratingstohelpyouunderstandtwo importantrelationships:1.howratingsfordifferentdimensionscompareforthesameschoolgroup;and2.how ratingsforsimilardimensionscompareacrossschoolgroups.

How to look at this data: Thebarsarecolor-codedtohelpyouseeataglancethedimensionsthateachgroupratesaspositive(higherthan 3.5),negative(lowerthan2.5),orneutral(between2.5and3.5). Lookforeachgroupsrelativeperceptionsaboutthevariousaspectsofschoolclimatebylookingacrossthechart. Lookattheconvergenceofopinionacrossgroupsbylookingatthecolumnsthatcorrespondtoeachdimension.

Important Note: Whenyoucompareresultsacrossgroups,rememberthatwhilethesurveysaredesignedtomeasuresimilar dimensions,theydosoinslightlydifferentwaysandwithdifferentpopulations.Therefore,somelevelofdifferenceis tobeexpected,simplybecauseofthedifferencesinherentinthegroupsthemselves.(Forexample,adultsmaybe lesslikelytogiveextremeanswersthanstudentsasaresultofage.)Werecommendthatyouconcentratemoston majordifferences,andpayspecialattentiontotherelativerankingsofthedimensionsbyeachgroup.Forexample, iftheschoolpersonnelratedtheenvironmenthigherthananyotherdimension(regardlessoftheactualnumerical score),whilethestudentsrateditnearthebottom,thatwouldbeworthexploring. For more detailed informationabouteachgroupsperceptions,besuretolookatthedetailedresponsepatterns(in SectionIIIofthisreport).Themedianisonlyamidpointthereareasmanyscoresbelowthatnumberasabove.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewSchool Climate Ratings --- Positives, Negatives and Neutrals

= median rating in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5-point scale)

= median rating in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5-point scale)

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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Comparative RatingsAnother ViewWhy is this important? Asacompaniontothepreviouschart,thischartpresentsthepositive,negativeandneutralratingsinslightly differentform.

How to look at this data: Youwillseeeachschoolclimatedimensionlistedintheleftcolumn,withthesurveyedschoolgroupsacrossthetop. Foreachgroupthechartindicateswhetherthemedianscalescorewaspositive,negativeorneutralasshowninthe color-codedkey. Werecommendthatyoukeepinmindtheconsiderationsdiscussedearlieraboutgroupdifferences,althoughmajor discrepanciesbetweenschoolgroupsshouldcertainlybeexploredfurther. Dimensionsthatareratednegatively,especiallyifthenegativeratingsareconsistentacrossgroups,indicateareas thatshouldbeaddressed.Becausesafety is such a foundational dimension,specialattentionshouldbepaidtolow ratings in this area. Weencourageyoutoexamine these findings in the contextofthemoredetailedprofilesthatfollow.Inallcases,it isimportanttoconsideranddiscussnotjustwhetherdimensionsareratedpositivelyornegatively,butalsotouse the results to think about whywhatyouasaschoolmayhavedonetopromotedimensionsthatarestrong,and howweakerdimensionsmayhavebeenneglectedoreveninadvertentlyundermined. NSCCalsorecommendsthattheanswerstothesequestionsleadyoutoconsider more questions and ideas for data-gatheringinyourschool,eithernoworinthefuture.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate OverviewComparative RatingsAnother View

Comparative Ratings Another ViewStudentsSafety Rules & Norms Sense of Physical Security Sense of Social-Emotional Security Support for Learning Social and Civic Learning Respect for Diversity Social Support / Adults Social Support / Students School Connectedness / Engagement Physical Surroundings Leadership Professional Relationships --- N/A ----- N/A ----- N/A ----- N/A ---

School Personnel

Parents

= median rating in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5 - point scale) = median rating in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5 - point scale) = median rating in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5 - point scale)

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewRelative Strengths and WeaknessesWhy is this important? Thischartallowsyoutolookatscale scores in relative termsforeachschoolgroup.Italsoallowsyoutolookat theorderinwhicheachgroupratesthedimensionsincomparisonwiththeothertwogroups.Thisshouldgiveyoua senseofthewaythoseindifferentgroupsperceivetheschoolsrelativestrengthsandweaknesses.

How to look at this data: Thischartshowsyouagraphicrepresentationofeach school groups median dimension ratings, in rank order fromhighest-ratedtolowest-rated.Youcanusethischarttocompare the relative perceptionsofthedifferent groupsforexample,aparticulardimensionmayberatedatthetopforonegroup,butnearthebottomforanother. Thisshouldgiveyouasenseofhowthedifferentgroupsperceivetheschoolsrelativestrengthsandweaknesses. Resultsarepresentedasaseriesofside-by-sidegraphs,oneforeachschoolgroup.Thelengthofthebarindicates thevalueofthemedianrating(whichisalsoshownnumericallyattheendofthebaritself ). Thedimensions are color-coded, soyoucaneasilylookacrossgroupstoseehowthedifferentgroupsperceiveda particulardimensionofschoolclimate. NSCCencouragesyoutofocus on relative rankings rather than numerical ratings.Inotherwords,ifstudents rateEnvironmenthigherthananyothercategory,whileteachersrateitoneofthelowest,youmightobtaina better understandingofthedifferenceinperceptionsthanifyousimplycomparethemedianratingforeachgrouponthat dimension.Somakeuseofthisgraphtoexaminetherelativerankings,andhowtheperceptionsofthedifferent groupscomparetooneanother.

The chart on the following pageisacompaniontothisandpresentstherelativerankingsforeachgroupinanumeric (ratherthangraphic)format.

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

II. School Climate Overview

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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II. School Climate OverviewGroup Differences

Comparative Rankings for Shared School Climate DimensionsSchool Climate DimensionsSense of Physical Security Safety Rules & Norms Social Support / Students Respect for Diversity Physical Surroundings Social Support / Adults Support for Learning School Connectedness / Engagement Sense of Social-Emotional Security Social and Civic Learning

Students1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 9 10

School Personnel1 2 6 6 6 2 4 5 10 9

Parents1 2 4 5 2 5 8 5 9 9

Note: If two or more dimensions have the same median score, they are given the same (higher) rank. For example, if two dimensions score a 4.0 and that is the highest score, they will both be ranked "1" and the next highest score will be ranked "3."

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CSCI Report - | schoolclimate.org

III. In-Depth ProfilesThisIn-DepthProfilesectionwillprovideyouwithadeeper and more focused pictureofperceptionsaboutsafety, teachingandlearning,relationships,andtheinstitutional environmentforeachoftheschoolgroupsandforselected sub-groupsofstudents,schoolpersonnelandparents. TheSchoolClimateDimensionsandComparativeRating Patternssectionswillprovideinformation on the rating patterns of each group for each dimension,lookingat consistencyofresponsefor each school group across school dimensions and also comparing the patterns across the surveyed school groups. IntheOverviewsectionatthebeginningofthisreport, theemphasiswasonoverall group response, based on median,ormid-pointscores,whichisagoodindicatorof overallopinion.However,one overall measure can never fully capture everything thatyouwanttoknow.Thissection ofthereportwillhelpyoudig deepertounderstandthe distributionofresponsesandactaccordingly. TheSub-GroupProfilessectionfocusesoncomparative ratings for key sub-groups. This includes students (e.g. grade,gender,race/ethnicity,languagestatus);school personnel(e.g.gradeandexperience);andparents (e.g. grade,race/ethnicity).Thisshouldhelpyouseewhether thereareidentifiablegroupsthatperceiveschoolclimate dimensionsinconsistentlydifferentwaysandwhich dimensionsmightbemostsensitivetodifferentpopulation characteristics.

Introduction School Climate Dimensions: - -- SafetyRules & Norms Sense of Physical Security Sense of Social-Emotional Security Support for Learning Social & Civic Learning Respect for Diversity Social SupportAdults Social SupportStudents School Connectedness/Engagement Physical Surroundings Leadership Professional Relationships

Comparative Rating Patterns Across Dimensions: Students School Personnel Parents

Sub-Group Profiles: Students School Personnel Parents

schoolclimate.org | Fairfield Ludlowe High School CSCI Report - December 2012

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III. In-Depth ProfilesIntroduction ThefindingsintheSchoolClimateDimensionssectionareorganizedaroundthetwelve(SchoolPersonnel)orten (StudentsandParents)measureddimensionsofschoolclimateorganizedunderthefourmajorareasthatcontribute toschoolclimate:safety,teachingandlearning,relationshipsandtheenvironment. Becausethereareasmanyscoresbelowthemedianasabove,itisimportant to look not just at the median ratings, but also to understand the distribution of responses by digging more deeply.Forexampleamedian ratingof3.0onthe5pointscalemightmeanthatalmostallofthoserespondinghadscoresbetween2.5and3.5, oritcouldmeanthathalfhadhighlynegativescores(closeto1)andhalfhadhighlypositivescores(closeto5).How youinterpretandactonthisinformationwouldbeverydifferentinthesetwoinstances. Thegraphsinthissectionillustratethepattern of responses for each school group,showingthepercentage ofstudents,schoolpersonnelandparentswhosescalescoresforeachdimensionfallintoeachrangefromvery negativetoverypositive.Inlookingatanddiscussingtheresponsepatternsforeachdimension,youshouldthink aboutthedegreetowhichrespondentsclusteraroundcertainjudgmentsorvaryacrossthespectrum.Ifthepattern indicatesmultipleclusters,thismaysuggestthattherearesub-groupsthatcouldbeexperiencingthisdimensionof schoolclimateverydifferently. Sub-group ratings can be further exploredintheSub-GroupProfilessection,whichreportsresultsforsomeofthe sub-groupsthatmightbeexpectedtoexperiencevariousaspectsofschoolclimatedifferently.Yourschoolshould identifywhetherthereareadditionalsub-groupsthatmightbeimportantforfutureanalysis. Forfulldetailsonhowthesurveyedgroupsrespondedtoeachindividualsurveyitemthatcompriseseachschool dimensionscale,youcanrefertotheDetailedResultssectionattheendofthisReport.

Why is this important? Thesechartswillallowyoutoseeingreaterdetailthedistributionofscalescoresforindividualswithineachgroup. Thisenablesyoutounderstand how much individuals perceptions within each group converge around the group median score andthepercentagewhosescalescoresfallintodifferentrangesfromhighlynegativetohighlypositive. Thefirstsetofgraphsisorganized around the ten dimensions of school climate, whichallowsyoutoseethe rangeofperceptionsforthethreesurveyedpopulationsinrelationtoeachdimension.Thesecondsetisorganized by survey group(e.gallstudentgraphstogether,allparentgraphstogether,etc).Thisallowsyoutoseeeach groupsresponsesacrossalldimensions,andidentifyanypatterns.

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III. In-Depth ProfilesIntroduction (continued)How to look at this data: Thesechartsshowthepercentageofindividualswithineachofthethreegroupswhosescoresfallintodifferent rangesfromverynegative(1.0to1.5)toverypositive(4.5-5.0)onthefive-pointscale.The scores are grouped in increments of 0.5 to provide you with more detailaboutthedistributionofscoreswithineachschoolgroup. Ashasbeenshowninpreviouscharts,thereisanotationgivingthepercentageofrespondentswhosescorescan beconsiderednegative(lessthan2.5),positive(greaterthan3.5)andneutral(between2.5and3.5).Themedian score is also noted on each chart. You should start by looking at the response patterns for each group and consider: - Thepercentageofeachpopulationsurveyed(e.gstudents,schoolpersonnel,andparents)whoperceiveeach dimensioninapositive,negativeorneutrallightinyourschool,aswellashowconsistentthepatternsofopinion appeartobewithineachgroup. Whetherthereareotherindicatorsinyourschoolthatdovetailwiththesepatterns,andanytheoriesyouhave thatmayaccountforsomeofthevariation.

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Inthenextsectionyoucanexplorethesetheoriesbylookingatoverallratingpatternsforspecificsub-groupsthat mayexperienceschooldifferently.Forexample,dogirlsreportadifferentsenseofphysicalsecurityvs.boys?Do schoolpersonnelwithmoreexperienceseesupportforlearningdifferentlyfromnewerstaff? You should also look at these patterns in comparative terms: - Isthereanyonegroupwhoseopinionsappearmoreconsistent?Forexample,istheremoreconvergenceof opinionamongschoolstaffthanamongstudentsorparents?Forwhichdimensionsdoyouseethismostclearly? Howmuchdothepatternsvary? Whataretheshiftingpatternsbetweennegative,positiveandneutral? Ifonegroupratesrespectfordiversityhigherthananother,isthisprimarilybecausemoreindividualsseeitina verypositiveway,orfewerseeitinaverynegativelight?Whatmightbeaffectingtheseratings? Whatdoesitmeanforyourschoolifmostopinionsconvergetowardthecentervs.arangeofopinionsthatare bothverypositiveandverynegative?Whatdifferencemightitmakeinwhatactionsyouconsiderappropriatefor improvement?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: SafetyRules & NormsSAFETY Safetyisabasicneed.Feelingunsafenaturally undermineslearningandhealthydevelopment.Safe schoolspromotestudentachievementandschool success.Historically,schoolshaveconcentratedon physicalsafety,showinglesssensitivitytoemotional safety.Inrecentyears,schoolshavebecomemore attunedtohowsocialsafetyandtheproblemof socialbullyingshapeslearninganddevelopment. Thissurveylooksatthreeaspectsofsafety:rules andnorms(institutionalsafety)andactualsenseof security-bothphysicalandsocial-emotional. Safety: Rules and Norms Thisscalefocusesontheclarityoftheschoolsrules formaintainingsafety,bothphysicalsafetyandsocialemotionalsafety,andtheconsistencyandfairness withwhichrulesareenforced.Forexample,isit clearthattherearerulesaboutphysicalandsocial bullying?Aretheyfairlyenforcedbyadultsinthe school?

Forcompletedetailsontheitemsthatcompriseallofthesescales,pleaserefertopp. Asaresultofrounding,percentagesmaydifferslightlyfromthoseonpages11-13.

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSafety: Sense of Physical Security Thisscalefocusesonthedegreetowhichpeoplefeel physicallysafeintheschoolbuildingandinthearea surroundingtheschool.Forexample,haveindividuals themselvesexperiencedphysicalabuseandtowhat extenthavetheyseenothersbeingsubjectedto physicalharmsuchaspushing,slappingorpunching?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Sense of Social-Emotional SecuritySafety: Sense of Social-Emotional Security Thisscalefocusesonthedegreetowhichpeople feelsafeinsocial-emotionalterms.Questionson thisscaleprobeexperienceandwitnessingofverbal abuse,harassment,andexclusion.

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Support for LearningTEACHING AND LEARNING Thegoalofschoolingistofosterlearningand development.Educationalresearchhasidentified factorsthatinfluenceschoolsuccess,includingtheuse ofvariedandcustomizedinstructionalstrategiesand thepromotionofstudentsreflective,self-monitoring, anddecision-makingskills.Studentsarealsomoreable learnerswhentheyaremadecomfortabletakingrisks, whentheyfeelsafenotknowing,andcangenuinely askforhelpinunderstanding.Adultsexpectationsfor studentsandtheabilitytocommunicatethisalso powerfullyshapelearningandschoolengagement. Teachingandlearningisalwayssocial,emotional andethicalaswellascognitiveinnature.Activeand purposefulsocial,emotional,andethicalteachingand modelingalsosupportsstudentsacademicachievement andschoolsuccess,aswellastheirdevelopmentinto responsibleandproductivecitizens. Teaching and Learning: Support for Learning Thisscalehighlightsadultsandstudentsinteractions inthelearningprocess.Forexample,dostudents feelthatteachersletthemknowwhentheydoa goodjobandofferthemconstructivefeedback?Is schoolworkchallenging?Istheresupportforlearning frommistakes?Isthereanopportunitytodemonstrate knowledgeandskillsinavarietyofways?Forcompletedetailsontheitemsthatcompriseallofthesescales,pleaserefertopp. Asaresultofrounding,percentagesmaydifferslightlyfromthoseonpages11-13. - . 104 136

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Social and Civic LearningTeaching and Learning: Social and Civic Learning Thisscaledescribestheextenttowhichsocialand civicknowledgeandskillsareactivelyincorporated intoschoollearningandhowethicaldispositionsare recognizedandvalued.Forexample,dostudents learntolistenandcooperatewithothers?Arethey encouragedtothinkaboutrightandwrong? Aretheysupportedinthedevelopmentofskillsfor reflectionandself-control?Dotheylearnhowto resolveconflictseffectivelyandamicably?

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School Climate Dimensions: Respect for DiversityINTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS Schoolexperiencesarebasedonrelationships.The extenttowhichadultsandstudentslistento,respect andtrustoneanothershapestheschoolcommunity. Howdostudentstreatoneanotheranddotheyhave anetworkoffriendstheycancountonforsupport? Whatisthequalityofsupporttheyfeeltheycan expectfromadultsintheschool?Dotheyfeelthere areadultswhocareaboutthemasindividualsand towhomtheycanturnforhelp?Finally,howwelldo adultscommunicateandcollaboratewithoneanother andwhattonedoesthatsetforstudents?Howallof thisisperceivedbystudentsprofoundlyaffectstheir expectationsforappropriatebehaviorandthequality oftheirschoolexperience. Interpersonal Relationships: Respect for Diversity Thisscalefocusesontheextenttowhichadults andstudentsintheschoolrespecteachothers differenceswithregardtosuchfactorsasgender, race/ethnicity,orphysicaldifferences.Itfocuses onpeerrelationshipsamongstudentsandamong adultsandontherelationshipsbetweenadultsand students.

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Social SupportAdultsInterpersonal Relationships: Social SupportAdults Thisscaledealswithqualityofsocialrelationships amongadultsandstudents.Istheremutualtrustand support?Doadultsappeartoworkwellwiththeir peers?Dostudentsfeelthatadultsintheschool showaninterestinthemandlistentowhattheyhave tosay?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Social SupportStudentsInterpersonal Relationships: Social Support Students Thisscaledealswithqualityofsocialsupportamong students.Dostudentshaveanetworkoffriendsthat sustainthemacademicallyandsocially?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesINSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT Theinstitutionalenvironmentintheschoolisdefined inbothphysicalandsocialterms.Socially,thisentails studentspositivesenseofconnectednesstoand engagementinthelifeoftheschoolasaninstitution. Dotheyidentifypositivelywiththeschoolandhave asensethatboththeyandtheirfamiliesbelong thereandarewelcome.Thisisanimportantaspect ofastudentsschoolexperienceandcontributes substantiallytoschoolsuccess.Thephysical environment-facilitiesandresources-isalso important.Naturally,howclean,caredfor,orderly andattractivetheschoolisaffectsteaching,learning, school engagement and overall morale. Institutional Environment: School Connectedness/ Engagement Thisscalefocusesonhowpositivelystudentsfeel abouttheirschoolandthedegreetowhichthey andtheirfamiliesareencouragedtoparticipatein schoollife.Dostudentsfeelgoodabouttheirschool andwhattheyaccomplishthere?Dotheyfeelthat theyareencouragedtobecomeinvolvedinschool lifebeyondacademics?Doestheschoolreachoutto families,bykeepingtheminformedandmakingthem feelcomfortablespeakingwithteachersorattending schoolevents?Forcompletedetailsontheitemsthatcompriseallofthesescales,pleaserefertopp. Asaresultofrounding,percentagesmaydifferslightlyfromthoseonpages11-13. - . 104 136

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Physical SurroundingsInstitutional Environment: Physical Surroundings Thisscalefocusesontheschoolsphysicalplant. Thisincludestherangeofschoolfacilities,their attractiveness,cleanlinessandcondition,andthe adequacyofthespaceandresourcesforpositive schoollife.

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Leadership (School Personnel Only)Staff Only: Leadership Thisscalefocusesontheleadershipcharacteristics anddecisionmakingstyleoftheschools administration.Doschoolleadersestablishand communicateaclearvision?Aretheyaccessibleand open?Aretheysupportiveandappreciativeofschool staff?Dotheyinvolvestaffinkeydecisions?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSchool Climate Dimensions: Professional Relationships (School Personnel Only)Staff Only: Professional Relationships Thisscalefocusesonthequalityofworking relationshipsamongschoolstaff.Dostaffwork welltogetherandlearnfromoneanother?Isthere mutualtrustandconstructivecollaboration?Arestaff supportiveofoneanotherandgenerouswiththeir help?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesComparative Rating Patterns Across DimensionsWhy is this important? Lookingatallthegraphsforeachschoolgroupshouldhelpyouunderstandhowconsistentlythegroupperceivesthe elementsthatcontributetoschoolclimate.

How you should look at this data: Lookatthedistributionofscoresacrossalldimensions: - - - - Doesthegrouptendtowardsimilardistributionpatternsforall? Isthepatternoneofgreaterconsistencyorawiderangeofopinion? Doesthepatternskewtowardtheextremesmoreonthepositiveornegativeside? Arethedistributionpatternsverydifferentfromonedimensiontothenext?Arethereanythatstandoutasbeing particularlydivergentfromthenorm?

Howdopatternscomparefordimensionsthatyoumightwanttoconsidertogether?Forexample,istheremore agreementaboutphysicalsafetythanaboutsocial-emotionalsafety?Ifonehasahighermedianscore,isthatprimarily becausemoreindividualsseethatoneasverypositiveorbecausenotasmanyseeitasverynegative?

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III. In-Depth ProfilesSub-Group RatingsWhy is this important? Thischartallowsyoutoseehowsub-groups of the surveyed populationsexperienceeachdimensionofschool climate.

How to look at this data: Thesechartscanfacilitatesomeinterestingcomparisons.Takenoteof: - - - - - - Howscoresforasingle dimensioncomparefordifferent sub-groups (vertically). Howscoresacross dimensionscompareformembersofthesame sub-group(horizontally). Domembersofonesub-grouptendtoproducescaleratingsthatareconsistentlyhigher,orlower,thanthe others? Mightsomeofthesepatternshelpexplainclustersofopinionthatwereonthehigh,orlow,endoftheresponse distributionsforadimensioninthepriorsection? Towhatextentmightdifferentpatternsbeattributabletodevelopmentaldifferencesand/orpatternsof adjustment? Towhatextentmightdifferentpatternsbeattributabletoschoolpoliciesthataffectthesegroupsindifferent ways?

Consider the following kinds of questions,whenlookingatthesecomparisons:

IMPORTANT NOTE: Anysub-groupsthataretoosmalltoguaranteeprivacytotherespondentswillnotbeincluded. Therefore, some of the charts in this section may be missing.Thisisnotanerroritmeansthatfewerthan10people fromthatparticularsub-group(forexample,males)inthatpopulation(forexample,schoolpersonnel)respondedtothe CSCIsurvey.

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= median rating in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5-point scale) = median rating in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5-point scale) = median rating in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5-point scale)

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= median rating in the negative range (scores lower than 2.5 on a 5-point scale) = median rating in the neutral range (scores between 2.5 and 3.5 on a 5-point scale) = median rating in the positive range (scores above 3.5 on a 5-point scale)

Detailsonsub-groupsizescanbeseenin theDemographicProfilesstartingonpage 80.

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IV. Recommended Guidelines and ResourcesThisRecommendedGuidelinesandResourcessectionshould helpyouunderstandhowtoapproachtheprocessofchangeand wheretostartbasedonthefeedbackinthisreport.Therearetwo recommendations sections in this report. Startingonthenextpage,youllfindtheProcess Recommendations, whichwillprovideyouwithafewideas onbeginningtheprocessoftranslatingtheCSCIresultsinto usefulactiontoimproveyourschoolclimate.Youllalsofind the Action Charts. Thereisonechartforeachoftheschool climatedimensions.Eachoneoutlinesaprocessformoving fromexaminingyourschoolssurveyresultstounderstandingthe reasonsforanyperceivedproblems,andfromtheretodeveloping specificsolutions. ForMoreInformation,Visitourwebsite[www.schoolclimate.org]. AtNSCCswebsiteyoullfindmorecomprehensiveinformationand extensiveresources,includingalistofprofessionaldevelopment workshopsandotherservicesthatcanhelpyouinyourschool climateimprovementwork. WeencourageyouandyourschooltousetheCSCIfindings presentedheretobringtheschoolcommunitytogether.The recommendationsectionsinthisreportsuggestaseriesofspecific stepsandstrategiestosupporttheprocess.Asyoudecidewhich schoolclimate-relatedspheresyouwanttofocuson,wehopeyou willdrawonNSCCsresourcestosupportprogrammaticplanning and implementation.

Process Recommendations: How To Do It and Where to Start Action Charts

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IV. Recommended Guidelines and ResourcesProcess Recommendations: How To Do It and Where to StartAllschoolslookforspecificprogrammaticrecommendationswhenplanningimprovementstotheirschoolclimate.However, how we go about facilitating school improvementisasimportant,ifnotmoreimportant,thanthespecificcurriculum, techniquesorinterventionsthatweuseinagivenphaseofschoolimprovement.Weallknow,forexample,thatanexcellent academiccurriculumwillbeuselessiftheenvironmentdoesnotsupportit.Theteachermustunderstandhowtouseitand beinvestedinitssuccess;thestudentsmustbepreparedforthematerial,andsoon.Inordertoseeresults,youmust create a school environment that supports any initiatives you introduce.Otherwise,theyarelikelytobeundermined. Belowaretenprocessguidelinesthatcurrentliteratureandpracticehaveshowntobeeffectiveinsupportingschool climateimprovementefforts.MoredetailedinformationcanbefoundonNSCCsWebsite,www.schoolclimate.org, includingtools,templatesandcasehistoriesthatillustratepotentialbarriers. 1) Form a representative and inclusive leadership team. Ifithasnotbeendonealready,itisstronglyrecommendedthat youformarepresentativeandinclusiveleadershipteamtoshepherdyourschoolclimateimprovementinitiative.When allmembersoftheschoolcommunityarerepresented,schoolimprovementplanshaveagreaterlikelihoodofsuccess. Thereareavarietyofwaysthatleadershipteamscanconveneforumswherestudents,staff,administrators,teachers, communitymembersandparentshaveanopportunitytosharetheirperceptions,prioritizegoals,anddevelopand implement action plans. 2) Designate a coordinator for the school climate improvement process.Sustainedschoolclimateimprovement effortsdependonawell-developedplananda skilled coordinator who is visible to the school community.Ideally,the schoolprincipalisinvolvedintheinitiative,butmostoftheday-to-dayworkishandledbythecoordinator.Thisfrees uptheprincipaltocontinuehisorhertasks,andalsoensuresthattheprocessisoverseenbysomeonewhocan devote the necessary time and attention. The skills you look for in a coordinator will depend on your school climate improvement plan.Forexample,aplanthatisfocusedaroundintegratingtheteachingofsocialandemotionalskillsinto regularclassroominstructionmayrequireadifferentcoordinatorthanaplanthatbeginswithafocusonstudentsafety interventions.Itsalsoimportantnottooverlooksocialandemotionalskilldevelopmentinadultswhendevelopingaplan and hiring a coordinator. 3) Educators, students, parents, and mental health professionals must work together.Substantiveschoolreform effortsmustinvolveongoingandvitalpartnershipsbetweenmembersoftheschoolcommunity.Howcanyoupromote parentaswellasstudentparticipation?Howcaneducatorsandmentalhealthprofessionalsworktogethertoanticipate barrierstolearningandhealthydevelopment?

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Process Recommendations: How To Do It and Where to Start4) Adult Learning: How teachers and parents act is often more important than what they say.EffectiveK-12social, emotional,ethicalandacademiclearningnecessitatesthatadults be involved with social, emotional and ethical learning themselves.Howwillyoumakethisprocessmeaningfulforadultsinyourschoolcommunity? 5) Promoting authentic learning communities. Thisisagoalforvirtuallyallschoolreformefforts.Alloftheseprocess recommendationswillpromotelearningcommunities.Howcanyoumakethisanexplicitgoal?Whatarethespecificways thateducatorsrevealthattheyarelearners? 6) Time frame: Substantive school improvement is, at a minimum, a three to five year process. School improvement effortsthataredesignedtobearfruitwithinayearortwotendtofail.Often,thereispressuretoincreasereading andmathscoresthisyear.Howcanyourcommunitydevelopthreetofiveyearplansthathavethepotentialtoresultin substantiveschoolclimateimprovementandalsostaythecourse? 7) Be sure your school climate improvement plan is well-designed and realistic.Itiseasytobeoverlyenthusiasticand attempttodotoomuchtoosoon.Itcanalsobetemptingtodevelopaplanquicklyandfinalizeitwithoutmuchserious discussionaboutwhetheritwillbeeffective.Theplanmustbeintegratedintoschoollife,anditmustbesupportedby everymemberoftheschoolcommunity.Ifyouhavenotdevelopedtheseaspectsofyourplan,itislikelythatyourefforts willnotbesuccessful. 8) Research and use evidence-based curricula to support change in your school.Naturally,itisimportantthatthe processofschoolimprovementbuildoninstructionalandprogrammaticeffortsthatwork.Asyourschoolbeginstodefine goals,whatevidence-basedcurriculummightbestservelearnersandteachers? 9) Continuous evaluation is an essential part of effective school improvement efforts.Howcanyourcommunity developmethodsofevaluationaboutwhatisandisnotworking?Howcanevaluationbecomethebasisforauthentic learningratherthananotheradministrativeburden?Whenyoudevelopactionplans,trytobuildinspecificmeasuresof yourcurrentstatusandsetbenchmarksforhowyoudliketoseethosemeasuresimproveovertimesothatyoucan monitoryourprogressasyougo. 10) Setting Goals: Focus on areas of strength and weakness.Schoolclimateimprovementeffortsnaturallytend tofocusonareasofrelativeneedorweakness.However,itisoftenbesttobegingoalsettingaroundareasofrelative strength. When the school community focuses on change projects that yield results, it becomes significantly easier

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IV. Recommended Guidelines and ResourcesProcess Recommendations: How To Do It and Where to Startto address major areas of challenge in ways that result in systemic change. Thisstrategyofsmall wins can be very effective.Changeisdifficult.Wesuggestthatyourinitialimplementationeffortsbuild on spheres of strength and/or represent areas where yourealisticallybelieve you will be able to make an impact in the first year. Whenschools electtoaddresstheirmostchallengingareasfirst,therecanbelittleornochangeinthefirstyearand,thiscanbe demoralizingtotheschoolcommunity.Ifyourschooldoesdecidetodothis,youshouldtakecaretosetuprealistic expectations. Onelastpointongoalsettingistostressthefundamentalimportanceoffeelingsafeinschools.To the extent that members of the school community do not feel safe in your school, we suggest that this become a focus for initial action.

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What can I do about problem areas in my school?Onthepagesthatfollow,youwillfindachartforeachdimensionof schoolclimate.Ifyoursurveydatasuggestthatoneormoreschool groupsperceivechallengeswithagivendimension,thechartsare designedtohelpyoudevelopaplantomakeimprovements.The dimensionsdooverlapwithoneanother,andyouwillseesimilaritiesin somecharts,especiallyforclosely-relateddimensionssuchasphysical andsocial-emotionalsafety. The first columnmakessuggestionsaboutdigging deeper into the problem.Youcantdesignaneffectiveplanuntilyouunderstandmore abouttheproblemandthenegativeperceptionswheretheyare,what theyconsistof,andhowtheyrelatetootherperceptions. The second columnidentifiessomeoftheunderlyingfactorsthatcan leadtolowscoresineachofthethreeschoolpopulations.Thisisnot intendedasareplacementforyourownresearch,butasastarting pointtohelpyouthinkaboutpotentialareasonwhichtofocus.Your interventions must be based on your own investigations. The third columnincludessomespecific stepsyoucantaketoaddress problemswiththisdimension,aswellasprogramsorpoliciesthat havebeensuccessfulinotherschools.Additionalprogrammaticideas andawidevarietyofresourcesareavailableatyourschoolportaland onNSCCswebsite(www.schoolclimate.org),includingbooks,articles, organizations,andprofessionaldevelopmentofferings. Bothhereandonthewebweveidentifiedapproachesandprograms thathavebeensuccessfulinthepast,butweencourageyouto conduct your own evaluationsanddeterminewhichprogramswill bemosteffectiveinyourschool.Alsoconsiderwhere your efforts will have the greatest impactsomeearlysuccesseswillhelpbuild greatersupportforlong-termchange.

Physical Safety Social-Emotional Safety Support for Learning Social & Civic Learning Respect for Diversity Social SupportAdults & Students School Connectedness/ Engagement Physical Surroundings Leadership and Professional Relationships

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V. Action ChartsPhysical SafetyPhysical Safety: When Physical Safety is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem Look at the two scalesRules & Norms for Safety and Sense of Physical Security. Are there issues with school policy (Rules & Norms) or with peoples experience of safety (Sense of Physical Security) or both? How do student responses to these dimensions compare to other information about safetythatyoucollect inyourschool,suchasIncidentReportsorstudent complaints? Are there sub-groups of students who feel particularly unsafe? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Are there particular aspects of safety that students perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudents respondedtoeachitemthatmakesupthescales forSafety-Rules&NormsandSenseofPhysical Security. Can you dig deeperthroughfocusgroups,follow-up surveys,ormoreinformalforumsforconversationswith specificgroupsaboutparticularissues? Forexample,iftheyoungeststudentsintheschool arefeelingparticularlythreatened,canyoufindout moreabouthowandwhy,viaadditionalresearch and/orbydiscussionswithschoolcounselorsand/or teachers? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Rules, Systems and Norms: Notclearlydefined Notfairlyorstrongly enforced;difficulttoenforce Notwell-alignedwithconsequences Notinformedbytheexperiencesofstudentsand school personnel Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Review your student code of conduct. Make sure that it is developmentally appropriate and aligns with your schools core values. Involve staff in the process and students as appropriate by age. Map problems by area and time. Have students and staff mark school diagrams indicating where they experience or witness problem behaviors and when. If possible, institute a computerized program that will track physical incidents in school.Thiswillallowyou tousecurrentdatatoidentifyproblemlocationsinthebuilding(more supervisioncanbeprovided)aswellasanalyzedatabytypeofinfraction,date,frequency,andconsequencesimposed. Make it easy and safe to report safety concerns. Alladultsshouldbe preparedtoreceivereports(writtenororal)fromstudentsinasensitive manner and to convey them to the appropriate person. It may also helptoprovideboxeswherestudentscanreportproblemsanonymously.Trytoprovideeachstudentwithanadultinwhomtheycanconfide. Supervision: Insufficientadultpresence Adultsinsufficientlytrained in crisis management and/ orinsocially&emotionally informeddiscipline Be sure your school has a crisis planandthatstudents,school personnel,andparentsallfeelconfidentaboutwhattodo.Consider speakingtoyourlocalpoliceorfiredepartmentifyouneedguidancein developinganeffectiveplan. Increase visibility and availability of adults in unstructured or problem areas oftheschool.Thiswillhelpstudentsfeelsaferandleadto morestudent-adultconversations,increasingtheprobabilitythatadults willhearaboutstudentconcerns. Educate all or key school personnelincluding School Safety Agentsin how to deal effectively with children in crisis.Manyof theseprogramsprovideexcellenttrainingfordevelopingsocial-emotionalskillsandethicaldispositionsinschoolpersonnel,aswellasawarenessofthewaysinwhichconflictscanescalateunnecessarilyandhow todefusethem. Address the issue of bullying.Establishandcommunicatetheschools anti-bullyingcommitment.Createacommonlanguageandestablish policiesandproceduresforaddressingbullyingincidentswhenand wheretheyoccur.

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Physical SafetyPhysical Safety: When Physical Safety is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do school personnel responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationrelatedtotheway schoolpersonnelperceivestudentsafety?Theirown safety? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive the school to be particularly unsafe? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,roleorexperience. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformation& teacherreports? Howdoesthiscomparetostudentpatternsby grade? Are there particular aspects of safety that school personnel perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Can you dig deeperthroughstaffmeetingsormore formalmeanssuchasfollow-upsurveysorfocus groups? Parents How do parent responses to this dimension comparetopriorparentfeedbackaboutsafety? Are parent respondents representative of your school body as a whole?Ifnot,canyoureachout moretounder-representedgroups? Are there sub-groups of parents who feel that their children may be unsafe in and around school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,genderorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfrom parents,suchascallsandcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsby grade,genderorrace/ethnicity? Are there particular aspects of safety that parents perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Individual Competencies: Studentslackofdevelopmentinsocial&emotional skills,suchasself-regulation, communication,andconflict resolution Roomforadultstoimprove capacityforself-reflection and ability to model positive behaviors Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful School-wide efforts to teachcopingwithstress,problem-solving,communication,conflictresolution,andotherimportantsocial-emotionalskills. Coordinate health-promotion and risk-prevention efforts. Train school personneltorecognizestudentbehaviorthatmayindicateproblems. Providetargetedservicestostudentswhoneedthem.Thisrequirescollaborationwithmentalhealthprofessionals. Promote students development of civic skills and behaviors in academic classes. Ratherthanrelyingprimarilyonexternalcontrolsandcompliance,providestudentswithopportunitiestointernalizevaluesandlearn andpracticestrategiesthatpromoteindividualandgroupresponsibility. Find evidence-based programs that will be effective in your school. Lookforprogramsthathavebeenstudiedandshowntobesuccessful. Itshelpfulifthedevelopersareavailabletosupportyouandanswerquestions,andbesureyouunderstandtheprogramsgoals,targetpopulation, expectedoutcomes,andessentialelementsofeffectiveimplementation. Spendsometimefindingaprogramyouhavefaithintheextraeffortwill payoff.Hereareafewexcellentsitesthatprovideinformationonprogramsrelatedtosafetythathavebeenrigorouslytestedforeffectiveness: Blueprints for Violence Prevention http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/index.html SAMHSA Model Programs http://nrepp.samhsa.gov/index.asp Promising Practices NetworkPrograms That Work http://www.promisingpractices.net/programs.asp

Peer/School Culture: Unhealthynormsforbehavioramongstudentsand/or school personnel Insufficientmodelingofsupportivebehavior,including up-standernorms Lowlevelsofgroupsupport &trust

NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Also visitNSCCswebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessionaldevelopmentandtraininginareasrelatedtophysicalsafety,includingBreakingtheBully-Victim-BystanderCycleandConflictResolution.

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V. Action ChartsSocial-Emotional SafetySocial-Emotional Safety: When Social-Emotional Safety is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem Are there issues with school policy (Rules & Norms) or with the experience of safety (Sense of SocialEmotional Security), or both? How do student responses to these dimensions compare to other indicators of social-emotional safety in yourschool?Howdoesthisrelatetotheexperienceof physicalsafety? Are there sub-groups of students who feel particularly vulnerable to social-emotional threats? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetoreportsfromguidance counselor/teachers,parentconcerns? Arepatternssimilartophysicalsafety,ordodifferent groupsfeelmoreat-riskfromonevs.theother? Are there particular aspects of social-emotional safety that students perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudents respondedtoeachitemthatmakesuptheSenseof Social-EmotionalSecurityscaleaswellasthescalefor Safety-Rules&Norms. HowdoesthisrelatetoRespectforDiversity? Can you dig deeperthroughfocusgroups,follow-up surveys,ormoreinformal,butstructuredconversations withspecificgroupsaboutparticularissues? Forexample,ifnamecallingisaparticularproblem, canyoufindoutmoreaboutwhenthisoccurs?Are thereissuesrelatedtoonlinemedia? Canyouprobemoretoidentifywhetherthreateningbehavioristiedtocertaingroups,orwhether threateningbehavioristiedtointoleranceforcertain groups? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Note:physicalandsocial-emotionalsafetyarecloselylinked. Therefore,youwillseesimilaritiesinthecommonsources andsuccessfulapproachescolumnsforthesetwodimensions. Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Review your student code of conduct with an eye toward socialemotional safety as well as physical safety. Howwelldoesitsupport social-emotionaleducationandsharedvaluesandcommunicatethis commitment?Involvestaffintheprocessandstudentsasappropriate by age. Map problem areas and times for social safety in line with the process outlined earlier for physical safety. Rules, Systems & Norms (especially those related to social bullying,teasing,andrespectful behavior): Notclearlydefined Notfairlyenforced Notstronglyenforced Notwellalignedwithconsequences Make it easy and safe to report problems.Alladultsshouldbepreparedtoreceivereports(writtenororal)fromstudentsinasensitive manner and convey them to the appropriate person. It may also help to providewaysforstudentstoreportanonymously. Increase visibility and availability of adults in unstructured or problem areas of the school. Thiswillhelpstudentsfeelsaferandalso leadtomorestudent-adultconversations,increasingtheprobabilitythat adultswillhearaboutstudentconcernsandunderstandwhereproblemsarecomingfrom. Educate school personnel in dealing effectively with children in trauma and in strategies to help prevent problems from escalating into school-wide crises. Address the issue of bullying.Establishandcommunicatetheschools anti-bullyingcommitment.Createacommonlanguageandestablish policiesandproceduresforaddressingbullyingincidentswhenand wheretheyoccur. Foster respect for diversity through programs that teach tolerance and appreciation for differences.

Supervision: Insufficientadultpresence Adultsinsufficientlytrainedin socially&emotionallyinformed discipline Moredifficulttomonitorvs. infractionsforphysicalsafety Adultsdontrealizetheseproblemsrequireintervention

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V. Action ChartsSocial-Emotional SafetySocial-Emotional Safety: When Social-Emotional Safety is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do school personnel responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationaboutsocialemotionalsafetyasitisperceivedbyand/oraffects teachers? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive the problem to be particularly serious? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,roleorexperience. HowdoesthisrelatetoRespectforDiversity? Are there particular aspects of social-emotional safety that school personnel perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredoncertainkindsofbehaviors? Can you dig deeperinstaffmeetingsorthrough moreformalmeanssuchasfollow-upsurveysor focusgroups? Parents How does this comparetopriorfeedbackfromparentsingeneralaboutsocial-emotionalsafety? Are there sub-groups of parents who feel that their children may be unsafe in and around school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,genderorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfrom parents,suchascallsandcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsby grade,genderorrace/ethnicity? Howdoesthiscomparetopatternsforphysical safety? Are there particular aspects of social-emotional safety that parents perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Can you dig deeperthroughparentoutreach? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Individual Competencies: Studentsunder-developed social&emotionalknowldege skills,anddispositions(selfawareness,self-regulation, flexibleproblemsolving, responsibility,andcooperative capacities) Needforadultstoenhance theirownsocial-emotional capacities and their ability to promote and model these behaviors Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Initiate or reinforce school-wide efforts to integrate direct instruction and practice of social-emotional skills,includingrecognizingandregulating emotions,problem-solving,effectivecommunication,andconflictresolution. Coordinate health-promotion and risk-prevention efforts.Educateschool personneltorecognizestudentbehaviorthatmayindicateproblems. Providetargetedservicestostudentswhoneedthem.Thisrequirescollaborationwithmentalhealthprofessionals. Promote students development of civic skills and behaviors in academic classes. Ratherthanrelyingprimarilyonexternalcontrolsandcompliance, providestudentswithopportunitiestointernalizevaluesandlearnandpracticestrategiesthatpromoteindividualandgroupresponsibility. Find evidence-based programs that will be effective in your school.Look forprogramsthathavebeenstudiedandshowntobesuccessful.Itshelpfulifthedevelopersareavailabletosupportyouandanswerquestions. Besureyouunderstandtheprogramsgoals,targetpopulation,expected outcomes,andessentialelementsofeffectiveimplementation.Spendsome timefindingaprogramyouhavefaithintheextraeffortwillpayoff.Below aresitesthatprovidesinformationonprogramsrelatedtosocialandemotionalsafetythathavebeenrigorouslytestedforeffectivenessinaddressing awiderangeofissues: Promising Practices NetworkPrograms That Work http://www.promisingpractices.net/programs.asp Blueprints for Violence Prevention http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/index.html CASEL - Meta-analysis of SEL Programs http://www.casel.org/sel/meta.php SAMHSA Model Programs http://nrepp.samhsa.gov/index.asp NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Alsovisit NSCCswebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessional developmentandtraininginareasrelatedtosocial-emotionalsafety,includingBreakingtheBully-Victim-BystanderCycle,ConflictResolutionand InfusingSELintotheCurriculum.

Peer/School Culture: Unhealthynormsforbehavior (socialbullyingandotherproblems are common) Inconsistentmodelingofsupportivebehavior,includingupstander norms Lowlevelsofgroupsupport &trust Aculturethatisinsufficiently tolerantofdifferences.Often socialbullyingisassociated withlackofrespectforothers basedoncharacteristicssuch asgender,race/ethnicityor sexualorientation.

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V. Action ChartsSupport for LearningSupport for Learning: When Support for Learning is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do student responses to this dimension compare toinformationonstudentsacademicperformanceand toperceptionsofstaffaboutthisdimension? Are there sub-groups of students who feel particularly unsupported in their academic work? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetoacademicmeasuresfor thesesamegroups? Are there particular aspects of support for learning that students perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudents respondedtoeachitemthatmakesuptheSupport forLearningscale. HowdoesthisrelatetoSchoolPersonnelperceptions? Can you dig deeperthroughfocusgroups,follow-up surveys,ormoreinformal,butstructuredconversations withspecificgroupsaboutspecificissues? Forexample,iftheseissuesareparticularlyacute forspecificgrades,doyouhaveanytheoriesabout aspectsofteachingandlearningthatmaybecontributingtotheseissues,e.g.curriculum,scheduling,or testing,inthosegrades? Canyoutestoutthesetheorieswithfurtherresearch? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Challenges in Curriculum: Limitationsofcurriculuminrelationto studentneedsandinterests Learningisdisconnectedfromthereal world;studentsdonotseeitsvalue Learningdoesnotbuildonstudents personalorlifeexperience Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Develop opportunities for teachers to review and revise the curriculum.Ifteachershaveconsiderableconcernsaboutthecurriculumor thewaystudentsinteractwithit,thoseconcernsshouldbeexplored. Support teachers in continuing their education through professional development and other opportunities.Makeeveryefforttoinclude teachersindecisionsaboutprofessionaldevelopment,andbesurea rangeoftechniquesareused(mentoring,peerobservation,collaborativeworkgroups). Ensure that extra help is easily available to all students. Itshould beeasyforstudentstotakeadvantageoftheextrahelptransportationshouldbeavailable,ifbeforeorafterschool.Dependinguponyour school,youmaybeabletoprovideextrahelpinavarietyofways teachers,parents,communitygroups,peertutoring,ormatching youngerandolderstudents. Classroom Management is often identified by teachers, especially newer teachers, as the most frustrating part of their jobs in the classroom.Workingwithteachers,researchsomeprogramsthathave beensuccessfulinhelpingteacherslearnanduseeffectiveclassroom managementtechniques.Thishelpsteachersfeelmorecompetent andlessstressed,andgoodclassroommanagementenablesthemto spendmoretimeandenergyoninstruction. Help teachers show students how the work they do in school is connected to their lives and the world around them. Encouragefield trips,service-learningclassesorprojects,interdisciplinaryunits,and linkswiththecommunity.Considermakingexplicitlypracticalclasses availabletostudents(moneymanagement,relationshipskills,resumewriting,etc). Continued on next page

Challenges in Instructional Practices: Needforadditionalprofessional developmenttosupportinstructional practicessuchasdifferentiatedinstruction,formativeassessment,authentic assessments,inquiry-basedinstruction, etc.

Challenges in Classroom Management: Schoolpersonnelhaveinsufficientprofessionaldevelopmentinhowtofoster caringandproductiveclassroomcommunities. Schoolpoliciesandguidanceareinsufficienttomitigatechronicmisbehavior in the classroom.

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V. Action ChartsSupport for LearningSupport for Learning: When Support for Learning is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the school personnel responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationaboutteachersfeelingsofsuccessintheclassroom? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who rate this dimension less positively than others? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,roleorexperience. Are there particular aspects of quality of instruction that school personnel rate poorly? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemsalignedwithstudentperceptions? Can you dig deeperthroughstaffmeetingsormore formalmeanssuchasfollow-upsurveysorfocus groups? Parents How do the parent responses to this dimension comparetoongoingfeedbackfromparentsabout teachingandinstruction? Are there sub-groups of parents who feel that their children are less well-supported academically? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,genderorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfrom parents,suchascallsandcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsby grade,genderorrace/ethnicity? Are there particular aspects of quality of instruction that parents perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Can you dig deeperthroughparentoutreach? Mightthisbeasubjectforfurtherdiscussionand/ orresearchonCurriculumorTeacher-Conference Nights? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Structural Barriers/Resource Constraints: Problematicstudent/teacherratios Pacingofcurriculum Schedulingconstraints Lengthofschoolday/schoolyear Testingpressure Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Consider how adult attitudes related to learning impact the school experience for students. Beclearabouttheschoolenvironmentyoudliketosee. Taketimetodefineyourgoalsasspecificallyaspossible,andthinkaboutwhat kindofexperienceandqualitiesstaffwouldneedtohavetorealizethisvision. Forexample,doschoolpersonnelmakeitclearthatrisk-takingandmistakes arepartofthelearningprocess?Dotheysupportindependentstudentinquiry?Bespecificaboutthisinrecruitingpotentialnewstaffmembers,aswell aswithcurrentstaff. All schools deal with structural barriers, including budget, physical space, and state or federal education/testing requirements. Oftenaschoolleader hasminimalpowertochangethosecircumstances.Evaluateyourownstructuralbarriersandhowtheyinfluenceyourschoolcommunity.Thismight includestudent/teacherratios,classroomspace,requiredcurriculum,mandatedtesting,andprofessionalcontracts.Considerhowstudents,parents, andschoolpersonnelareaffectedbytheseaspectsofschoollife.Thinkabout whatlatitudeyoumayhavetochangesomeofthesefactorsand/orwhat actionyoucantaketomitigatetheirimpactwithinexistingconstraints. There is a wide array of resources for the development of supportive environments for learning.Belowarejustafewwebsitesthatcanconnectyou torelevantresearchandhelpidentifyevidence-basedprogramstoaddressa rangeofissuesrelatedtosupportforlearning. ERIC - Education Resources Information Center http://www.eric.ed.gov Center for Comprehensive School Reform & ImprovementDatabase http://www.centerforcsri.org/research/improvement.cgi What Works ClearinghouseInstitute of Education Sciences http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/ Promising Practices NetworkPrograms That Work http://www.promisingpractices.net/programs.asp NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Alsovisit NSCCswebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessional developmentandtraininginareasrelatedtoinstructionalsupport,including EffectiveClassroomManagement.

Behavioral/Attitudinal Barriers: Behavioralpatternsandattitudes thatimpedeabilityofstudentsto constructivelyaskfororreceivehelp Behavioralpatternsorattitudesthat impedeabilityofteacherstoconstructivelygivehelptoallstudents

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V. Action ChartsSocial and Civic LearningSocial and Civic Learning: When Social and Civic Learning is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do student responses to this dimension compare tootherinformationaboutwhetherstudentsarelearningusefulsocialandcivicskillsinschool?Howdoesit comparetostaffperceptions? Do social-emotional and civic education appear to be lacking for all students,orforparticularsub-groupsof students?Conversely,doesitappeartobeparticularly strongforcertaingroupsofstudents? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences, particularlybygrade. Are there particular aspects of social-emotional & civic education that are missing? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudents respondedtoeachitemthatmakesuptheSocial& CivicLearningscale Howdoesthisrelatetoperceptionsofschoolpersonnel? Can you dig deeperthroughfocusgroups,follow-up surveys,ormoreinformal,butstructuredconversations withspecificgroupsaboutspecificissues? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Structural: Pressuresrelatedtotimeand testing Inadequatepersonneltosupport theseefforts Piecemealanddisjointedinterventionsthatarenotsufficently integrated into behavioral norms fortheschool Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Review what your school is already doing to teach social and emotionalskillstostudentsandcivicdispositions,andconsiderhowitmay bestandardized,adaptedorexpandedinordertobemoreeffective. Remember,wearealwaysmodellingwaysofhandlingsocial,emotional andethicalchallenges,whetherconsciously,helpfully,ornot.Socialemotionalandciviceducationcoversabroadarrayofimportantskills thatcanbesuccessfullylearnedinavarietyofways.Schoolprograms canencompassstand-aloneclasses,e.g.mediationorethicsand school-wideservicelearningprojects. Appoint a Social-Emotional/Civic Education Coordinator to be responsiblefororganizingandimplementingtheseinitiatives,aswellassupportingschoolpersonnelintheirefforts.Also,develop a committee or task forcemadeupofadministratorsandteachersfromallgrade levelstoreviewmaterialsandcurricula.Theycanberesponsiblefor overseeingtheimplementationofsocialandemotional,and/orcivic andcharactereducationintheschool.Researchsomesuccessful programsandchooseonethatseemstobeagoodfitforyourschool. Therearemanyexcellentcurriculaavailablethatprovideguidelinesand lessonplansforteachingsocial-emotionalskillsandethicaldispositions. Determinewhatoutcomesyourelookingforandfindawaytoevaluate thesuccessoftheprogramaftersometimehaspassed. Observe your own behavior, andconsiderthewaysinwhichyoucould becomemoresociallyandemotionallyskilledandamorepositiverole model.Findopportunitiesforpersonalandcollegialreflection. Work to educate students, parents and school personnel on the value of social and emotional skills, ethical dispositions and civic behaviors.Thereareanumberofresearchstudiessupportingthe importanceoftheseskillswhichmaybehelpfultoyouinmakingyour caseforchange.Reinforcethevalueoftheseskills.Askpeopleto describeapersontheyadmire.Mostlikely,thequalitiestheynamewill besocial,emotionalandethicalstrengths. Institute a student peer mediation program. This can help resolve studentconflictswhilealsoteachingimportantskillsindealingwithdisagreements. Continued on next page

Instructional: Nodedicatedcurriculumcovering social-emotionallearning,ethical dispositions and civic competencies Noembeddedinstructionon thesesubjectswithinacademic lessons Unevenimplementationwithin and across classrooms Socialandcivicinstructionthat staffthinkofasembeddedor implicitmaynotbepickedupby students

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V. Action ChartsSocial and Civic LearningSocial and Civic Learning: When Social and Civic Learning is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the responses to this dimension compare tootherindicatorsfromstaff?Howdoesitcompare tostudentperceptions? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who rate this dimension less positively than others? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygradeorexperience. Are there particular aspects of social, emotional, ethical, and civic learning that school personnel identify as lacking, or others that appear to be especially well supported? LookatSectionVfordetails. Arethesealignedwithstudentperceptions? Can you dig deeperthroughstaffmeetingstounderstandpatternsandpotentialbarriers? Parents How do the parent responses to this dimension comparetoongoingfeedbackfromparentsabout social,emotional,ethical,andciviclearning?Are parentsinyourschooltypicallyawareofand/orconcernedaboutthisissue? Are there sub-groups of parents who feel that their children are less well-supported by this kind of instruction? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,genderorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfrom parents,suchascallsandcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsby grade,genderorrace/ethnicity? Are there particular aspects of social, emotional,, ethical and civic learning that parents perceive to be present or missing? LookatSectionVfordetails. Can you dig deeperthroughparentoutreach?Might thisbeasubjectforfurtherdiscussionand/or researchonCurriculumorTeacher-ConferenceNights? Cultural/Attitudinal: Schoolleadersandstaff donotovertlycommunicatethevalueofsocialemotional,ethicaland civic learning Adultsactionsmaybe unintentiallyatoddswith espousedbeliefsand valuesaspromotedin programs,symbolsand signs Parentsmaynotsignal to their children or to the school that it is importantforschoolsto promote social and civic knowledge,skillsanddispositions Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Professional Development: Insufficientopportunities tolearnhowtodeliver stand-alonesocialand civiccurriculumand/or infusetheseprinciples into classroom practice or academic content Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Encourage service learning projects and other activitiesthathelpstudentsapplytheir knowledgeinnewways.Aservicelearningprojectcanhelpstudentsbecomemore committedmembersoftheirowncommunity,andalsohelpthemtranslatetheirknowledgeintoreal-worldchallenges.Thesecanbeschool-wideprojects,classroom-based orconnectedtoafter-schoolclubs.Schoolsshouldalsostronglyencouragestudents totakepartextracurricularactivitiesthatcandevelopstudentssocial-emotionalskills, suchassports,studentgovernment,artsandclubs. Provide professional development, mentoring and other opportunitiesforschoolpersonneltodeveloptheirownsocialandemotionalskillsaswellastheirabilitytoinfuse theseprinciplesintotheirclassroompractice.Theseskillscanbetaughtseparately fromacademicsubjectsorincorporatedintoacademics,forexample,throughaclassroomdiscussionabouttheemotionalmotivationsofaparticularfictionalcharacter,or theethicalchoicesoftenraisedinscience. Find research to support the value of social and civic learning and investigate evidence-based programs that will be effective in your school.Lookforprogramsthat havebeenstudiedandshowntobesuccessful.Asimportantly,thinkabouthowyou willintegrateanyprogramsintoyourcurrentschoolpracticeandencouragestudents toapplytheskillstheyarelearningintheclassroom.Belowaresitesthatprovide researchinformationandevidence-basedprograms: ERIC - Education Resources Information Center http://www.eric.ed.gov Center for Comprehensive School Reform & Improvement-Database http://www.centerforcsri.org/research/improvement.cgi What Works Clearinghouse - Institute of Education Sciences http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/ Promising Practices NetworkPrograms That Work http://www.promisingpractices.net/programs.asp CASEL - Meta-analysis of SEL Programs http://www.casel.org/sel/meta.php NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.AlsovisitNSCCs website(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessionaldevelopmentand traininginareasrelatedtosocialandciviceducation,includingInfusingSELintothe CurriculumandConflictResolution.

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V. Action ChartsRespect for DiversityRespect for Diversity: When Respect for Diversity is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the student responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationaboutrespectfordiversity thatyoumaymonitorinyourschool?Howdoesthis relatetoissuesofsafety? Are there sub-groups of students who feel particularly sensitive about the level of tolerance and support for diversity in the school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetoreportsfromguidance counselors,teachersandparents? Arepatternssimilartothoseforsafety? Are there particular aspects of respect for diversity that are perceived to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudents respondedtoeachitemthatcontributetoRespectfor Diversity. Isthereanysuggestionthatproblemsrelatemore topeerinteractionamongstudentsoradult/adultor adult/studentrelations? Can you dig deeperthroughfocusgroups,follow-up surveys,ormoreinformal,butstructuredconversations withspecificgroupsaboutspecificissues? Canyouprobemoretoidentifywhethertherearespecificissuesrelatedtodiversitythatareespeciallyproblematic?Gender?Race/ethnicity?Forolderstudents, sexualorientation? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Peer/School Culture: Insufficientexposureto diversity Weakorineffectivenorms formutualrespectandtolerance Schoolculturethatsonarrowlydefinessuccessthat it inhibits the appreciation ofdiversityandthepotentialcontributionofallcommunitymembers Insufficientmodelingof supportiveattitudesand behavior Lowlevelsoftrustfordiscussionofdifferences Diversityissuesnotregarded as a problem Overtsignsofrespectfor diversity(posters,mission statements)atoddswith schoolexperience Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Develop a school-wide vision for Respect for Diversity. Whatdoes RespectforDiversitymeantomembersoftheschoolcommunityand howwouldtheyliketoseeitembodiedinschoollife? You can help develop this shared vision by facilitating discussions with students and staff about what Respect for Diversity means to them.Whattypesofdiversitydotheywanttopromote?Whatarethe currentchallenges? Provide structured opportunities (e.g. Challenge Day, School Retreats, Service Learning) for students and staff to develop an awareness of personal and group biasesthatinhibitcommunitybuildingandtodevelopanappreciationofcommongroundandinterconnectedness. Bring in community groups that deal with issues of discrimination and rights related to race, gender, sexual orientation, and other differences.Identifylocalgroupswhohelpsupporttheseeffortsin schools.Therearealsosomewell-respectednationalorganizations whichmayhavelocalchaptersinyourareaorcanhelpconnectyouto localorganizationsthataddresssimilarissues.Considercontacting:the Anti-DefamationLeague,NationalOrganizationforWomen,theNAACP, theGayandLesbianAssociationAgainstDefamation,theCongresson RacialEquality,andothers. Make it easy and safe for both students and school personnel to report incidents of mistreatment that target specific groups. Provide easy and safe opportunities for community members to offer suggestions for promoting increased respect for diversity in the school. Provide training in mediation or conflict resolutiontohelpheadoff potential incidents.

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V. Action ChartsRespect for DiversityRespect for Diversity: When Respect for Diversity is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the school personnel responses to this dimension compare to otherinformationaboutrespectfordiversityasitisperceivedbyand/or affectsteachers? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive the problem to be particularly severe? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade,roleorexperience. Howdoesthisrelatetoperceptionsofsafety? Are there particular aspects of respect for diversity that school personnel perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredonspecificrelationshipsstudents,adults, adult-studentinteractions? Can you dig deeperinstaffmeetingsorthroughmoreformalmeans suchasfollow-upsurveysorfocusgroups? Parents How do the parent responses to this dimension comparetopriorfeedbackfromparentsingeneralaboutrespectfordiversity?Howdoesthis relatetoparentsperceptionsaboutSchoolCommunity&Collaboration? Are the views of all parents represented in the data(seeResponse Ratesatthebeginningofthereport)? Are there sub-groups of parents who perceive this to be a particularly severe problem? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade,genderor race/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfromparents,suchascalls andcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsbygrade,genderor race/ethnicity? Howdoesthiscomparetopatternsforsafety? Are there particular aspects of respect for diversity that parents perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredonspecificrelationshipsstudents,adults,adultstudentinteractions? Can you dig deeperthroughparentoutreach? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Individual Attitudes/ Dispositions: Studentsneedfor developmentinsocial& emotionalskillsandethicaldispositionssuchas empathy&fairness Roomforadultsto improveself-reflective capacity and ability to model positive behaviors Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Use any incidents as learning opportunities.Ratherthancondemningtheperpetrators,attempttocreateanopendialogueaboutthe sourceoftheproblemanddifferentperspectivesontheincident. Harshlycondemningthebehaviorwithoutmediationcansquelch dialogueandgivestudentstheideathattheseissuesshouldnotbe discussed. Provide training to school personnel on diversity-related issues. (Alsoattendthesetrainingsyourselfthissetsapositivetonefor theschool.)Besureschoolpersonnelunderstandhowproblemscan affectfeelingsofsafetyintheschoolaswellasthestudentsability tolearn.Encourageteacherstoraisetheseissuesintheirclassrooms. Provide learning opportunities for students to become more comfortable with all groups within your school community. Remember thatadultsmusttaketheleadonthisissuestudentswillbepaying attentiontotheadultattitudesandtheexamplethatisset.Welldesignedinterventionscanmakeadifferenceinyourschool,aswell asauthenticcelebrationsofholidaysorotheroccasionsdesignedto honorindividualgroupsofpeople. Encourage any interested students to form a club focused on bias awareness and respect for diversity. Letthemtakethelead ontheirchosenactivities.Studentsmightalsotakeonthetaskof researchingaschoolclimateproblemontheirownchoosingthe topic,gatheringinformationandproposingsolutions. Following are just some of the organizations that focus on this work: Anti-DefamationLeaguehttp://www.adl.org Teaching Tolerancehttp://www.teachingtolerance.org FacingHistoryandOurselveshttp://www.facinghistory.org/ NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal. AlsovisitNSCCswebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbody ofprofessionaldevelopmentandtraininginareasrelatedtoinstructionalsupport,includingDiversityTrainingandConflictResolution.

Professional Development: Schoolstaffmayneed additional learning opportunitiestofeelcomfortable intervening in these situations Schoolstaffmayneedto developgreaterawarenessofhowlackof respect may be negatively affectingtheirstudents

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V. Action ChartsSocial SupportAdults and StudentsSocial Support: When Social Support from adults or students is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How does this compare to other information, in general, about the quality of relationships and social support in your school? Are there sub-groups of students who do not feel that they have sustaining friendships with peers or the social support of the adults in the school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetoreportsfromguidance counselors/teachers,parentconcerns? Arepatternssimilartothoseformorale?Arethey relatedtorespectfordiversity? Are there particular aspects of Social Support that are stronger than ohters? LookatSectionVfordetailsonhowstudentsrespond edtoeachitemthatcontributetothesetwoscales SocialSupportAdultsandSocialSupportStudents Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem School Culture and Norms: Schoolenvironmentinsufficientlysupportiveorinclusive Impedimentstoschoolpersonneldevelopingstrongrelationshipswithone another Impedimentstoschoolpersonnelbuilding strong relationships or connecting withstudentsindividually;couldbe relatedtoschedulingand/ortoclass size Studentshaveinsufficientopportunity tointeractwithawideanddiverse groupofpeersbecauseofstructure, schedulingorsocialnorms. Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Encourage supportive relationships between school personnel and students by instituting an advisory period and/or class meetings, duringwhichstudentswouldmeetinsmallgroupswithanadult. Thishasbeenshowntoimprovethequalityofindividualrelationships betweenadultsandstudents,whichhasasalutaryeffectonstudents healthandtheirsuccessinschool.Thiscanencourageanexchangeof ideasnotonlybetweenadultsandstudents,butalsopromoteconnectionsandfriendshipsamongstudents. Provide opportunities for professional learningaboutconnectingwith andengagingstudentsthroughworkshops,conferences,reciprocal classroomobservationsandprofessionallearningcommunities. Develop a school-wide service learning program or project.Ifthe entireschoolisworkingtowardacommongoal,andtryingtomakea differenceinthecommunity,studentsmaybegintofeelmoreclosely connectedtothosearoundthem-bothpeersandadults. Encourage students to become involved in extra-curricular activities wheretheycandevelopadditionalfriendshipsandpositiverelationships withadultadvisors. Encourage adults to become advisors for extra-curricular activities sothattheycanconnectwithstudentsoutsideoftheclassroomand gettoknowstudentsnon-academicinterestsandtalents. Consider developing other non-academic opportunities for team-building and socializing for studentssuchasclasstrips,outdooreducation orstudentretreats. Investigate the benefits of peer counseling programs and student mentor programsforoldertoyoungerstudents.

Can you dig deeper through focus groups, follow-up surveys, or more informal, but structured conversations with specific groups about specific issues? Canyouprobemoretoidentifywhethertherearespecificgroupsthatmayfeelespeciallydisaffected?

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V. Action ChartsSocial SupportAdults and StudentsSocial Support: When Social Support from adults or students is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the school personnel responses to this dimension comparetoongoingfeedbackaboutrelationshipsintheschool fromschoolstaff?Howdoesthiscomparetoindicatorssuch asstaffturnover? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive the problem most? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade, roleorexperience. Are there particular aspects of social support that are problematic? LookatSectionVfordetails. Dostaffpercieveproblemsinpeersupportamongstudents? Dotheirperceptionsalignwithstudentperceptions?Aresubgroupsofstaffmoresensitivetoissuesthanothers? Dostaffpercieveproblemsinthesupportthatstudents recievefromadultsintheschool?Dotheirperceptionsalign withstudentperceptions?Aresub-groupsofstaffmoresensitivetotheseissues? Can you dig deeperthroughstaffmeetingsormoreformal meanssuchasfollow-upsurveysorfocusgroups? Parents How do parent responses to this dimension compare to prior parentfeedbackaboutthesocialadjustmentoftheirchildren? Doparentsfeelthatthereareadultsintheschoolthattheir childcanturnto? Are there sub-groups of parents who feel that their children may not be socially supported in the school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade, gender or race/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetootherinformationfromparents, suchascallsandcomments? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsbygrade, genderorrace/ethnicity? Are there particular aspects that parents perceive to be a problem? LookatSectionVIfordetails. Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Find research to support the value of relationships and mutual trust in schools and investigate evidence-based programs that may effectively support the development of higher quality relationships in your school.Belowaresitesthatprovideresearch informationandevidence-basedprograms: ERICEducation Resources Information Center http://www.eric.ed.gov Center for Comprehensive School Reform & Improvement Database http://www.centerforcsri.org/research/improvement.cgi What Works ClearinghouseInstitute of Education Sciences http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/ Promising Practices NetworkPrograms That Work http://www.promisingpractices.net/programs.asp For Adult/Adult Professional Relationships as perceived by school staff, see Action Charts for Leadership and Professional Relationships NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal. AlsovisitNSCC'swebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowing bodyofprofessionaldevelopmentandtraininginareasrelatedto thequalityofrelationships.Thisincludesresourcesfromarange oforganizations,includingNSCC(whichofferstrainingsinTeam BuildingandDevelopingaMiddleSchoolAdvisoryProgram,among others).

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V. Action ChartsSchool Connectedness/EngagementSchool Connectedness/Engagement: When School Connectedness/Engagement is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the student responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationaboutstudentconnectedness/engagement?Whichotherscalesseemtobe alignedwiththesepatterns?Dotheyrelatemoreto qualityofrelationships,teaching&learning,orsafety andsecurity? Are there sub-groups of students who appear to be particularly disengaged? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetoreportsfromguidance counselors,teachers,andparents? Are there particular aspects of this dimension that are perceived as particularly inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Can you dig deeper through focus groups, follow-up surveys, or more informal, but structured conversations with specific groups about specific issues? Canyouprobemoretoidentifywhethertherearespecificgroupsthatmayfeelespeciallydisconnected? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem According to research, there are several factors that are associated with weak school ties: perceivingthatteachersareunsupportive anduncaring ostracismfrompeersandteachers beingdisengagedincurrentandfuture academic programs believingthatdisciplineisunfairandineffective notparticipatinginextracurricularactivities Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Address other issues that students have identified as problems. Asyoucansee,thefactorsinthesecondcolumn arerelatedtoseveralotherdimensionsofschoolclimate measuredbytheCSCIsurvey.Closelyexamineyoursurvey resultsandtakenoteofthedimensionsthatarerankedlowestoftheten(oreight)bythethreedifferentgroups.Think aboutwaysinwhichissuesintheseotherareasmightbe underminingschoolconnectednessandpositiveengagement. Alsothinkaboutthewaysinwhichhigherrateddimensions mightpresentopportunitiesthatcanbeleveragedtosupport stronger connectedness/engagement. Develop a new school tradition designed to build cohesion in the school community.Includestudentsintheplanning ofthisnewtradition,andensureitissomethingtheentire schoolcommunitycangetexcitedabout. Consider instituting a suggestion box for activities that intereststudentsandpartnerwithcommunitygroupsthat cansupportprogramsextra-curricularactivitiesandenrichment programs. Offer incentives for involvement in extracurricular activities. This may be as simple as removing barriers to involvementintheseactivities.Besuretransportationisavailable, andconsiderprovidingfoodinthecafeteriaafterschool hours,orkeepingtheschoollibrarystaffedandopenafter school.Encouragestaffaswellasstudentstoparticipate andconsiderwaystosupporttheirinvolvement.Publiclyrecognizethehardworkandaccomplishmentsofextracurricular groups/activities.

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V. Action ChartsSchool Connectedness/EngagementSchool Connectedness/Engagement: When School Connectedness/Engagement is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the school personnel responses to this dimension comparetootherinformationaboutthemoraleofschoolpersonnel? Whatotherscalesseemtobealignedwith lowratingsforconnectedness/engagement ofteachers,administrators,andotherschool personnel?Howdoesthiscomparetoindicatorssuchasretention/turnoverorabsenteeism? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who appear to be particularly disengaged? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade,role,orexperience. Parents How do the parent responses to this dimension comparetootherindicatorsofparent satisfaction? Are there sub-groups of parents who appear to be less positive about the school? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesbygrade,gender,race/ethnicity. Howdoesthiscomparetopatternsofparentcommentsorcomplaints? Howdoesthiscomparetothestudentpatternsbygrade,gender,race/ethnicity? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Improve communication, which is often a major factor influencing parent perceptions of school climate. Qualityofschooolcommunicationtoparents/familiesand Responsivenessoftheschoolandtheteacherstocommunicationsfrom theparents/family Bothcanaffecthowparentsperceivetheschoolandtheirlevelofoverall satisfaction Institute a weekly or monthly school newsletter.Awebsite,e-maillistor blogmayalsobeeffective. Invite parents into the school regularly.Encourageteachersandother schoolpersonneltofindwaysofincludingparentsintheiractivities.Make theschooleasilyaccessibleforparents. Find out what would support parents in becoming more involved with the school.Throughparentsurveysorothermeans,discoverwhatparentssayarethemajorobstaclestoparticipationinparentsnightand otherschoolevents.Someschoolshavecreatedcommunitycenterstofill importantneedsforparents(childcare,food,medicalcare,educational offerings,communityevents)whilealsodrawingthemintotheschoolenvironment. Make sure the school is a welcoming environment for all families and thatitissensitivetothelanguageandcultureofthefamiliesofallstudents in the school. Find ways to connect school personnel to the community, e.g.take themonatouroftheneighborhood,guidedbyparents.Considermaking thisaregularevent. Thefollowingaresourcesofresearchandprogramsonschoolconnectedness/engagement: ERIC - Education Resources Information Center http://www.eric.ed.gov What Works Clearinghouse - Institute of Education Sciences http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/ NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Also visitNSCC'swebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessionaldevelopmentandtraininginareasrelatedtoschoolconnectedness.

Barriers to Parental Involvement: Insufficientoutreachandpositivecommunicationormiscommunications, unintendedmessages Miscommunicationsandunintended messagesthatmaymakecertain groupsfeelunwelcome Schoolpoliciesanddecision-making style Logisticalbarriersscheduling,access Languageandculture Physicallayoutoftheschoolandintimidatingorcumbersomesign-inprocedures

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V. Action ChartsPhysical SurroundingsPhysical Surroundings: When Physical Surroundings is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group Students Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the student responses to this dimension compare tootherindicatorsthattheschoolhasaboutthe physicalenvironment?Isthisperceivedconsistentlyby allmembersoftheschoolcommunity? Are there sub-groups of students who perceive the environment to be particularly problematic? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferencesby gender,gradeorrace/ethnicity. Arefacilities/suppliesdifferentforanygroupsofstudents(forexample,bygrade)? Are there particular aspects of the environment perceived as particularly inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredonfacilities,maintenanceor supplies? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Inadequate facilities: Olderschoolswithstructuralproblems Inadequatespaceforthesizeofthe studentbody Poormaintenance Lackingadequatelunchrooms,gyms, libraries,labs Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Once youve done the follow-up work to find out what aspects of the school environment are most troubling, solicit ideas on what can be done about the problem(s). Consider a community meeting to discuss solutions for the problem. Examineallideasthatcomefromthecommunity,eveniftheyseem implausibleatfirst. Heres one way to structure such a meetingthathasbeeneffective forothers:first,askeveryonepresenttobrainstormalltheproblems theywouldliketobefixed.Writedowneverysingleone.Beginatthe topofthelist,andstartadiscussiononwhichofthefirsttwoitems ismoreimportant.Whenyouvedecidedonone,comparethatitem tothenextitemonthelistanddiscusswhichofthetwoismost important,andsoon.Thistechniqueismosteffectivewithaskilled and impartial moderator. Find a way to upgrade the school environment yourself. Perhapsalargegroupofparents,schoolpersonnel,andstudents can work together one dayonatasksuchaspaintingtheschool, repairingtheplayground,orcleaninguptrash. You can also look for community memberswithspecificskillsin theseareasthattheymightbewillingtocontribute. Physical improvements of this kind can also improve school morale andshowtheschoolcommunitythatchangesarebeingmade.Even small,visiblechangescanhelpbuildexcitementandcommitmentto theschoolclimateimprovementprocess.Aimforsomesmalltriumphsthatwillhavethiseffect. Involving students in these effortscanhelpthemtounderstandthe workinvolved,andencouragethemtotakebettercareoftheschool. Itcanalsobuildcommunityandcommonpurpose. Work from the broken windows philosophy popularized by the NYPD.Takingcareofevensmallenvironmentalissuescanhelp improveotheraspectsofschoolclimate. Continued on next page

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V. Action ChartsPhysical SurroundingsPhysical Surroundings: When Physical Surroundings is perceived as a problem in your school, here are some steps you can take:School Group School Personnel Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem How do the school personnel responses to this dimension compare to other indicators that the schoolhasaboutthephysicalenvironment?Isthis perceivedconsistentlybyallmembersoftheschool community? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive the environment to be particularly problematic? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences byrole,experience,grade. Arefacilities/suppliesdifferentforanygroupsof schoolpersonnelbyrole,subjectarea,grade? Are there aspects of the environment that are perceived as particularly inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredonfacilities,supplies,time? Parents How do the parent responses to this dimension compare to other indicators that the school has aboutthephysicalenvironment?Isthisperceivedconsistentlybyallmembersoftheschoolcommunity? Are there sub-groups of parents who perceive the environment to be particularly problematic? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygender,race/ethnicity,grade. Are there aspects of the environment that are perceived as particularly inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemscenteredonfacilities,supplies,time? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Develop fund-raising ideas to support changes and updates in the school. Thereareseveralresourcesavailabletoassistwithfund-raising ideas,andliterallythousandsofcreativeideascanbefoundinbooksand onwebsites. Besuretoassign responsibility for this tasktoapersonorgroup ofpeople.Fund-raisingcanbeanexcellentjobforaparentorparentteachergrouptotakeon.Olderstudentsoftentakeanactiveroleas well. The people benefiting from or requesting the changes may be willing to contribute tothiseffortinsomeway.Thiscouldmeanfinancialcontributionsoracommitmentoflaborortime. There are many funding sources now online, includingwebsitesthat allowschoolpersonneltopostitemsorfundstheyneedforspecific purposes(afieldtrip,newbooks,amicroscope).Individualdonorscan viewtherequestsandchoosetofundoneormore. Dont forget the usual financial channelswhenseekingfundsfor schoolimprovements.Evenbudgetrequeststhathavebeenpreviously deniedmightbereconsiderediftheschoolcommunityiswillingto contributeaspecificamountoftime,money,orlabortogetthework done. If nothing can immediately be doneaboutaproblemintheschoolenvironment(forexample,overcrowdingoradesignflawinthebuilding),you canstilllookforwaystomaketheissueeasiertodealwith.Solicitideas fromtheschoolcommunity. NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Also visitNSCC'swebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)foragrowingbodyofprofessionaldevelopmentandtraininginrelatedareas.

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V. Action ChartsProfessional Development and LeadershipDimensions Related to Working Conditions for School Personnel: If one or both of these are perceived to be problems in your school, here are some steps you can take:Developing a Deeper Understanding of the Problem School Personnel: Leadership How does this compare to other scales and indicatorsrelatedtotheexperienceofschoolpersonnel? Howdoesthiscomparetoothermeasuresofprofessionalsatisfactionandretention? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who perceive school leadership to be weaker and less supportive? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,role,orexperience. Are there particular aspects of leadership that are perceived as inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemsperceivedtocenteronvision,accessibilityandsupport? Can you dig deeper through focus groups, follow-up surveys, or more informal, but structured conversations with specific groups about specific issues? School Personnel: Professional Relationships How does the response to this dimension compare tootherscalesandindicatorsrelatedtothequality ofteachingandlearning?Howdoesthiscompareto retentionorothermeasuresofsatisfaction? Are there sub-groups of school personnel who appear perceive less support in the way of professional development? LookatSectionIIICtoseeiftherearedifferences bygrade,role,orexperience. Are there particular aspects of professional development that are perceived as inadequate? LookatSectionVfordetails. Areproblemsperceivedtocenteroncontent,methods,degreeofinput? Examinetheresponsetoquestionsaboutspecific PDexperienceinDetailedResultssection.Have teachershadthistraining? Canyoudigdeeperthroughfollowupconversations? Identifying Some Common Sources of the Problem Vision: Lackofclarity Lackofconsistency Lackofcommunicationregardingtheschoolsvisionandmission Support: Insuffficientaccesstoschool leaders Insufficientorineffectivecommunicationfromschoolleaders Schoolpersonneldoesnot feelsupported/appreciatedby administration Decision Making Style: Limitedinvolvementofstaffin decisionsaffectinginstruction, professionallearningand/or discipline Workplace structure & norms: Insufficientopportunitiesforcollaborationwithcolleagues(e.g. betweenteachers) Insufficientcommunicationand cooperationacrossdifferent groups(e.g.,teachers,support staff,andadministration) Ineffectivenormsthatdonot promotemutualtrustandsupport Nostructuresorencouragementforsharingprofessional practiceandlearningfromone another Schedulingpressuresthatprohibit collaboration Approaches/Programs that Schools and Research Have Found to Be Successful Learn more about your leadership and decision-making styles and your approach to conflict resolution. Self-assessmentinventories,personal andcollegialreflectioncanbehelpful.Usethisknowledgetoinformyour workingrelationshipsatschool. Think about your vision for the school. Has it been developed as a sharedvisionacrosstheschoolcommunity.Isitrevisitedovertimeto reflectnewvoices,goalsandchallenges. Consider ways in which you could improve communication with teachers and staff.Askfortheirinputinguidingyourefforts. Developmorecollaborativedecisionmakingstylesandnormsfordistributedleadership. Make a special effort to involve teachers in decisions about professional development and provide teachers with opportunities related to social-emotional issues,e.g.socially&emotionallyinformedclassroom management,self-reflectionanddiversity. NSCC can helpSeetheResourcesectionofyourSchoolPortal.Also visitNSCC'swebsite(www.schoolclimate.org)forsupportsandresources. Structure opportunities for staff to work togetherwithinandacross positions,disciplinesandgradelevels. Develop Professional Learning Communitiesforexaminingandsharing instructionalpractice. Develop norms for observing classrooms, sharing feedback, and developing principles for best practice. Ask teachers to present successful techniques or programs at staff meetings.Thiscanbeahelpfulwayofpassingonknowledgeaswellas recognizingtheaccomplishmentsofteachersandstaffmembers. Consider implementing a mentoring program or group discussionsfor teachersaboutclassroomexperiences. Adopt team-building activities.Thereareavarietyoftheseavailable,and theycanhelpbuildafoundationforbettercommunicationandimproved relationships.

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VI. Detailed FindingsThisfinalsectionprovidesvery specific information on how each group responded to the individual CSCI survey items.Itispresentedbysurveyedpopulation (e.g.students,schoolpersonnel,andparents)for each dimension. Youllalsofinddemographic profiles of respondents for each group.Demographicinformationwas enteredbyeachrespondent,onthelastpageofthe survey.Thesedemographicgroupscorrespondtothe sub-groupgraphsintheIn-DepthProfilesectionof thereport.Ifthisdemographicinformationdoesnot matchcloselywithyourschoolpopulationasawhole, somegroupsmayhavebeenunder-representedinthe surveyedpopulation. Formorespecificinformationonunderstanding the CSCI Measureandthewayresultsarepresented, seeAppendixA. Note: Thesurveywasdesignedtobeinterpreted attheleveloftheschoolclimatedimensions,and thereforeNSCCdoesnotrecommendmaking decisionsbasedontheitem-by-itemdataalone.

Scale scores by Group Item-by-Item Survey Responses(Students, School Personnel & Parents)

Demographic Profiles(Students, School Personnel & Parents)

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VI. Detailed FindingsScale Scores by Group

Comparative Ratings for Shared School Climate DimensionsStudents School Climate Dimension Safety Rules & Norms Sense of Physical Security Sense of Social-Emotional Security Support for Learning Social and Civic Learning Respect for Diversity Social Support/ Adults Social Support/ Students Connectedness/ Engagement Physical Surroundings Leadership Professional Relationships Med. 3.83 4.00 3.00 3.50 2.89 3.75 3.63 3.80 3.50 3.67 N/A N/A Min. 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 N/A N/A Max. 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 N/A N/A School Personnel Med. 4.33 4.40 3.67 4.15 3.90 4.00 4.33 4.00 4.13 4.00 3.77 4.10 Min. 2.17 2.60 1.78 3.00 2.30 2.50 3.00 2.80 2.88 2.50 1.31 2.70 Max. 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Med. Parents Min. Max. 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 N/A N/A 3.83 1.00 4.20 1.00 3.33 1.11 3.50 1.00 3.33 1.00 3.75 1.00 3.75 1.00 3.80 1.00 3.75 1.00 3.83 1.50 N/A N/A N/A N/A

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Safety Rules & NormsSurvey Item In my school, there are clear rules against hurting other people (for example, hitting, pushing or tripping). Adults in the school are fair about making sure that all students follow the rules against physically hurting other people. Adults in the school will stop students if they see them physically hurting each other (for example, pushing, slapping or punching). In my school, there are clear rules against insults, teasing, harassment and other verbal abuse. Adults in this school are fair about making sure that all students follow the rules against insults, teasing, harassment or other verbal abuse. Adults in the school stop students if they see them insulting, teasing, harassing or otherwise verbally abusing other students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.02 (32) 0.03 (37) 0.02 (31) 0.03 (46) 0.04 (54) 0.04 (50) 0.07 (98) 0.06 (90) 0.05 (65) 0.10 (146) 0.12 (173) 0.11 (152) 0.15 0.50 (212) (713) 0.22 0.53 (315) (743) 0.14 0.46 (199) (650) 0.22 0.49 (309) (689) 0.29 0.46 (406) (656) 0.27 0.45 (377) (631) 0.25 (360) 0.16 (229) 0.33 (470) 0.16 (226) 0.09 (124) 0.14 (201) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsSense of Physical SecuritySurvey Item I have seen students being hurt at school more than once by other students (for example, pushed, slapped, punched, or beaten up).* I feel safe in the schoolyard or area right around the school. I have been physically hurt at school more than once by other students (for example, pushed, slapped, punched or beaten up).* I feel physically safe in all areas of the school building. There are places in my school where I do not feel physically safe.*

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 3.00 4.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.16 (228) 0.02 (33) 0.56 (792) 0.02 (32) 0.37 (528) 0.31 (444) 0.02 (31) 0.27 (378) 0.04 (58) 0.40 (565) 0.21 0.24 (302) (341) 0.13 0.53 (178) (750) 0.10 (141) 0.05 (68) 0.07 (100) 0.30 (423) 0.02 (34) 0.31 (434) 0.03 (43) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.13 0.50 (182) (709) 0.13 (183) 0.07 (96)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsSense of Social-Emotional SecuritySurvey Item Many students at my school go out of their way to treat other students badly.* I have been insulted, teased, harassed or otherwise verbally abused more than once in this school.* There are many students in my school who seem to be made fun of a lot by other students.* Most students in my school act in a way that is sensitive to the feelings of other students. Students at my school will try to stop students from insulting or making fun of other students. Very few students insult or make fun of other students. There are groups of students in the school who exclude others and make them feel bad for not being a part of the group.* I have seen other students insulted, teased, harassed or otherwise verbally abused more than once by other students in this school.* Most students in my school try to treat other students the way theyd want to be treated.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Response Rating Disagree Agree Know 3.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.09 (122) 0.23 (328) 0.05 (65) 0.06 (86) 0.10 (148) 0.17 (235) 0.04 (61) 0.07 (100) 0.08 (110) 0.40 (564) 0.30 (429) 0.22 (312) 0.21 (293) 0.29 (405) 0.28 (390) 0.15 (219) 0.21 (296) 0.18 (253) 0.37 0.11 (520) (161) 0.19 0.20 (272) (287) 0.30 0.33 (420) (471) 0.44 0.28 (620) (390) 0.35 0.22 (502) (317) 0.30 0.20 (430) (283) 0.30 0.35 (423) (500) 0.24 0.36 (338) (514) 0.35 0.35 (490) (495) 0.03 (46) 0.07 (97) 0.10 (148) 0.02 (25) 0.03 (43) 0.05 (76) 0.15 (210) 0.12 (165) 0.05 (64) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Support for LearningSurvey Item My teachers encourage me to try out new ideas (think independently). My teachers let me know when I do a good job. If I am feeling confused about something in class, I feel comfortable saying so. Teachers give me an opportunity to show them what I know and can do in a variety of ways (for example, papers, presentations, projects, tests). In school, I feel challenged to do more than I thought I could. My teachers give me useful feedback on my work. My teachers encourage us to see mistakes as a natural part of the learning process. My teachers show me how to learn from my mistakes. My teachers help me figure out how I learn best. My teachers give me individual attention on schoolwork.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.03 (42) 0.03 (46) 0.06 (84) 0.04 (61) 0.04 (56) 0.04 (59) 0.07 (104) 0.05 (66) 0.09 (126) 0.07 (103) 0.09 (133) 0.11 (157) 0.20 (278) 0.07 (102) 0.10 (143) 0.12 (171) 0.17 (240) 0.14 (193) 0.23 (322) 0.19 (270) 0.22 0.54 (310) (760) 0.23 0.50 (319) (713) 0.25 0.41 (352) (576) 0.21 0.50 (293) (702) 0.27 0.44 (380) (623) 0.27 0.48 (384) (686) 0.25 0.43 (350) (610) 0.30 0.45 (420) (643) 0.33 0.31 (466) (438) 0.33 0.36 (464) (507) 0.12 (164) 0.13 (180) 0.09 (126) 0.18 (256) 0.15 (210) 0.08 (116) 0.08 (109) 0.07 (93) 0.04 (62) 0.05 (67) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social and Civic LearningSurvey Item In my school, we talk about ways to help us control our emotions. In my school, we have learned ways to resolve disagreements so that everyone can be satisfied with the outcome. In my school, we talk about the way our actions will affect others. In my school, we discuss issues that help me think about how to be a good person. In my school, we discuss issues that help me think about what is right and wrong. In my school, we have learned how to work quickly and quietly so we can get our work done and still do other things we enjoy. In my school, we talk about the importance of understanding our feelings and the feelings of others. In my school, we work on listening to others so that we really understand what they are trying to say. I feel that I am better at working with other people because of what I learn in my school.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.15 (210) 0.07 (95) 0.07 (94) 0.05 (73) 0.06 (79) 0.08 (113) 0.11 (153) 0.06 (88) 0.06 (86) 0.42 (588) 0.29 (404) 0.29 (404) 0.26 (367) 0.23 (328) 0.19 (275) 0.34 (475) 0.21 (294) 0.15 (213) 0.33 0.09 (472) (126) 0.42 0.21 (599) (291) 0.36 0.26 (504) (373) 0.37 0.30 (523) (422) 0.39 0.30 (546) (421) 0.33 0.35 (468) (492) 0.37 0.16 (525) (232) 0.38 0.31 (535) (443) 0.37 0.36 (525) (505) 0.01 (14) 0.02 (24) 0.03 (38) 0.02 (31) 0.03 (42) 0.05 (67) 0.02 (29) 0.04 (56) 0.06 (86) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Respect for DiversitySurvey Item Students in this school respect differences in other students (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Students in this school respect differences in adults (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in this school respect differences in students (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in this school respect each others differences (for example gender, race, culture, etc.).

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.05 (67) 0.04 (53) 0.03 (36) 0.02 (28) 0.12 (172) 0.09 (121) 0.05 (71) 0.03 (47) 0.25 0.48 (355) (673) 0.25 0.51 (357) (719) 0.16 0.53 (229) (743) 0.21 0.56 (302) (796) 0.10 (144) 0.12 (166) 0.24 (335) 0.17 (242) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social Support / AdultsSurvey Item Adults who work in my school treat students with respect. Adults in my school seem to work well with one another. Adults in this school have high expectations for students success. Adults who work in my school treat one another with respect. Adults in my school seem to trust one another. If students need to talk to an adult in school about a problem, there is someone they trust who they could talk to. Adults in my school are willing to listen to what students have to say. Adults in my school are interested in getting to know students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.03 (38) 0.02 (25) 0.02 (27) 0.02 (32) 0.02 (31) 0.04 (59) 0.06 (90) 0.06 (78) 0.11 (150) 0.04 (62) 0.05 (66) 0.04 (62) 0.06 (81) 0.09 (134) 0.13 (187) 0.15 (209) 0.24 0.52 (334) (738) 0.26 0.58 (365) (816) 0.18 0.47 (258) (659) 0.22 0.59 (312) (839) 0.30 0.51 (427) (727) 0.23 0.50 (321) (709) 0.29 0.43 (413) (614) 0.35 0.39 (495) (552) 0.11 (153) 0.10 (142) 0.29 (406) 0.12 (171) 0.11 (149) 0.14 (192) 0.08 (111) 0.06 (81) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsSocial Support / StudentsSurvey Item Students have friends at school they can turn to if they have questions about homework. Students have friends at school they can trust and talk to if they have problems. Students work well with other students in class even if they are not in the same group of friends. Students have friends at school to eat lunch with. Students try to make new students feel welcome in the school.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.02 (31) 0.02 (29) 0.06 (86) 0.05 (74) 0.05 (74) 0.03 (41) 0.04 (56) 0.16 (225) 0.09 (129) 0.09 (130) 0.11 0.50 (151) (703) 0.16 0.55 (221) (783) 0.26 0.45 (368) (637) 0.26 0.48 (362) (682) 0.31 0.44 (436) (622) 0.34 (485) 0.23 (325) 0.07 (99) 0.12 (166) 0.11 (151) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: StudentsSchool Connectedness / EngagementSurvey Item My school tries to get students to join in after school activities. My school tries to get all families to be part of school activities. I feel like I belong at my school. I like my school. My school tries to let my family know about whats going on in school. I feel good about what I do in school. My parents and family members feel comfortable talking to my teachers. I think my parents/guardians feel welcome at my school.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.02 (24) 0.08 (113) 0.06 (87) 0.09 (124) 0.05 (64) 0.04 (58) 0.03 (44) 0.02 (35) 0.09 (121) 0.36 (508) 0.08 (112) 0.10 (136) 0.13 (182) 0.11 (152) 0.04 (60) 0.04 (60) 0.23 0.54 (329) (761) 0.35 0.18 (499) (258) 0.27 0.43 (375) (614) 0.24 0.42 (345) (590) 0.25 0.47 (359) (663) 0.27 0.47 (389) (663) 0.23 0.52 (321) (732) 0.22 0.57 (312) (811) 0.13 (178) 0.02 (35) 0.16 (226) 0.16 (221) 0.10 (147) 0.11 (154) 0.18 (257) 0.14 (197) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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Item-by-Item Survey Responses: Students

Physical SurroundingsSurvey Item My school building is kept clean. My school has up-to-date computers and other electronic equipment available to students. My school is physically attractive (well designed, nicely decorated, etc.). We have space and facilities for extra-curricular activities at my school. We need more basic supplies in school (for example, books, paper and chalk). * My school building is kept in good condition.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.05 (64) 0.06 (79) 0.09 (123) 0.04 (50) 0.13 (186) 0.04 (56) 0.10 (138) 0.09 (134) 0.13 (190) 0.06 (90) 0.35 (492) 0.07 (94) 0.23 0.47 (325) (670) 0.16 0.45 (224) (640) 0.25 0.42 (352) (588) 0.16 0.54 (233) (768) 0.27 0.17 (379) (238) 0.22 0.52 (312) (739) 0.15 (219) 0.24 (338) 0.11 (160) 0.19 (273) 0.08 (120) 0.15 (215) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Safety Rules & NormsSurvey Item In this school, there are clear rules against physically hurting other people (for example, hitting, pushing or tripping). Adults in the school fairly enforce rules regarding physical violence. Adults in this school will stop students if they see them physically hurting each other (for example, pushing, slapping or punching). In this school, there are clear rules against insults, teasing, harassment and other verbal abuse. Adults in the school fairly enforce rules against insults, teasing, harassment, or other verbal abuse. Adults in the school stop students if they see them insulting, teasing, harassing or otherwise verbally abusing other students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 5.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 1/5 2/5 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.04 (7) 0.02 (4) 0.03 (5) 0.07 (12) 0.06 (9) 0.04 (6) 0.05 (8) 0.05 (8) 0.03 (5) 0.09 (15) 0.13 (21) 0.09 (14) 0.44 (71) 0.38 (62) 0.36 (59) 0.48 (78) 0.56 (91) 0.52 (84) 0.46 (75) 0.50 (81) 0.55 (90) 0.34 (55) 0.24 (39) 0.34 (56) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.04 (0) (6) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelSense of Physical SecuritySurvey Item There are areas of this school where adults do not feel physically safe.* I have seen students push, slap, punch or beat up other students more than once in this school.* Most students feel physically safe in the schoolyard or area right around the school. Most students feel physically safe in all areas of the school building. There are areas of this school where students do not feel physically safe.*

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 1.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 2.00 1/5 1/5 3/5 3/5 1/5 0.64 (104) 0.47 (77) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.36 (59) 0.29 (47) 0.32 (52) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.40 (65) 0.02 (4) 0.05 (8) 0.07 (12) 0.07 (12) 0.13 (21) 0.02 (3) 0.12 (20) 0.53 (87) 0.46 (75) 0.06 (9) 0.02 (4) 0.01 (1) 0.37 (60) 0.45 (73) 0.02 (3) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.03 (0) (5) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.04 (0) (6) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelSense of Social-Emotional SecuritySurvey Item Many students at this school go out of their way to treat other students badly.* Its common for students to tease and insult one another.* There are many students in this school who seem to be made fun of a lot by other students.* Most students in this school act in a way that is sensitive to the feelings of other students. Students at this school will try to stop students from insulting or making fun of others. Very few students make fun of other students. There are groups of students in the school who exclude others and make them feel bad for not being a part of the group.* I have seen students insult, tease, harass or otherwise verbally abuse other students more than once in this school.* Most students in this school try to treat other students the way theyd want to be treated.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Response Rating Disagree Agree Know 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.26 (43) 0.15 (24) 0.13 (22) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.06 (10) 0.19 (31) 0.01 (1) 0.56 (91) 0.44 (71) 0.52 (84) 0.04 (6) 0.15 (25) 0.13 (22) 0.22 (36) 0.39 (63) 0.04 (6) 0.12 (19) 0.21 (34) 0.23 (37) 0.03 (5) 0.18 (30) 0.09 (15) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.13 (21) 0.10 (16) 0.09 (15) 0.02 (3) 0.02 (3) 0.12 (20) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.16 0.64 (26) (105) 0.39 (64) 0.34 (55) 0.39 (64) 0.14 (23) 0.33 (54) 0.42 (69) 0.25 (41) 0.22 (36)

0.09 0.72 (15) (117)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelSupport for LearningSurvey Item Teachers encourage students to think independently. Teachers let students know when they do a good job. Students feel comfortable letting their teachers know when they are confused. Students can get extra help if they need it. Teachers give their students opportunities to show what they know and can do in a variety of ways (for example, papers, presentations, projects, tests). Teachers use activities and assignments designed to help determine which teaching methods work best for each student. Teachers challenge students to exceed their expectations. Teachers give their students useful feedback on their work. Advanced students are given appropriately challenging work. Teachers encourage their students to see mistakes as a natural part of the learning process. Teachers show their students how to learn from their own mistakes. Teachers help their students figure out how they learn best. Teachers give their students individual attention on schoolwork.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 3/5 1/5 3/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.05 (8) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.06 (9) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (2) 0.04 (7) 0.03 (5) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.05 (8) 0.04 (7) 0.14 (23) 0.04 (7) 0.06 (9) 0.15 (24) 0.06 (10) 0.10 (17) 0.12 (19) 0.13 (22) 0.12 (19) 0.14 (22) 0.10 (16) 0.48 (78) 0.48 (77) 0.56 (91) 0.42 (69) 0.46 (75) 0.47 (77) 0.54 (88) 0.51 (84) 0.41 (67) 0.50 (82) 0.56 (92) 0.56 (90) 0.56 (92) 0.41 (67) 0.45 (73) 0.18 (29) 0.49 (80) 0.38 (62) 0.22 (36) 0.31 (51) 0.29 (47) 0.34 (55) 0.24 (39) 0.22 (36) 0.21 (34) 0.23 (38) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.03 (0) (5) 0.00 0.07 (0) (11) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 0.09 (0) (15) 0.00 0.10 (0) (17) 0.00 0.07 (0) (12) 0.00 0.09 (0) (14) 0.00 0.09 (0) (14) 0.00 0.09 (0) (15) 0.00 0.09 (0) (15) 0.00 0.09 (0) (14) 0.00 0.10 (0) (16) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social and Civic LearningSurvey Item Adults in this school talk with students about strategies for understanding and controlling their emotions. In this school, we teach ways to resolve disagreements so that everyone can be satisfied with the outcome. Adults in this school help students think about how their actions will affect others. Adults in this school discuss issues that help students think about how to be a good person. Adults in this school help students think about how they would handle difficult situations. In this school, we discuss issues that help students think about what is right and wrong. In this school, we teach skills that help students plan their time so they can get their work done and still do other things they enjoy. Adults in this school encourage students to understand the importance of their feelings and those of others. Adults in this school help students listen to others so that they really understand what they are trying to say. In this school, we encourage students to learn how to work well with other students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.04 (6) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.03 (5) 0.18 (29) 0.02 (3) 0.07 (11) 0.04 (6) 0.08 (13) 0.17 (27) 0.05 (8) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.10 (17) 0.29 (47) 0.56 (91) 0.37 (60) 0.28 (46) 0.09 (15) 0.19 (31) 0.14 (23) 0.13 (21) 0.20 (32) 0.11 (18) 0.20 (33) 0.19 (31) 0.22 (35) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.07 (0) (11) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.07 (0) (12) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.11 0.66 (18) (107) 0.19 (31) 0.58 (94)

0.21 0.61 (34) (100) 0.13 (21) 0.19 (31) 0.17 (27) 0.21 (34) 0.53 (87) 0.42 (68) 0.56 (91) 0.55 (90)

0.07 0.67 (11) (108)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRespect for DiversitySurvey Item Students in this school respect each others differences (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Students in this school respect differences in adults (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in this school respect differences in students (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in this school respect each others differences (for example gender, race, culture, etc.).

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 1/5 2/5 1/5 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (2) 0.06 (9) 0.02 (4) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.15 0.63 (25) (103) 0.07 0.64 (11) (104) 0.02 (3) 0.04 (6) 0.50 (82) 0.55 (91) 0.14 (23) 0.25 (41) 0.46 (75) 0.38 (63) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social Support / AdultsSurvey Item Adults who work in this school treat students with respect. Adults in this school have high expectations for students success. Adults in this school generally act with students best interests in mind. There are adults in this school that students would trust enough to talk to if they had a problem. Adults in this school are willing to listen to what students have to say. Adults in this school are interested in getting to know students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 5.00 4.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 2/5 1/5 3/5 3/5 3/5 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (2) 0.02 (4) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.02 (4) 0.06 (10) 0.03 (5) 0.04 (6) 0.02 (3) 0.06 (10) 0.38 (62) 0.44 (72) 0.43 (70) 0.53 (86) 0.60 (97) 0.59 (96) 0.58 (95) 0.45 (74) 0.50 (82) 0.42 (68) 0.37 (60) 0.32 (52) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.03 (0) (5) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social Support / StudentsSurvey Item Students have friends at school they can turn to if they have questions about homework. Students have friends at school they can trust and talk to if they have problems. Students in this school seem to work well with one another even if theyre not in the same group of friends. Students have friends at school to eat lunch with. Students try to make new students feel welcome in the school.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 3/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.04 (6) 0.02 (4) 0.06 (9) 0.10 0.63 (16) (103) 0.15 0.65 (25) (106) 0.15 (25) 0.60 (97) 0.20 (33) 0.16 (26) 0.18 (30) 0.11 (18) 0.17 (28) 0.00 0.06 (0) (10) 0.00 0.04 (0) (6) 0.00 0.02 (0) (4) 0.00 0.05 (0) (8) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.20 0.62 (32) (101) 0.20 (33) 0.53 (86)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given School Connectedness / EngagementSurvey Item This school encourages students to get involved in extra-curricular activities. This school encourages staff to get involved in extra-curricular activities. This school encourages all families to be part of school activities. This school feels like a positive community. People are proud to be part of this school community. This school makes an effort to keep families informed about whats going on in school. Parents and family members are made to feel comfortable talking to teachers. Parents/guardians are made to feel welcome at this school.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 2/5 3/5 0.00 (0) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (2) 0.07 (11) 0.07 (11) 0.04 (7) 0.02 (4) 0.02 (3) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.05 (8) 0.19 (31) 0.18 (29) 0.12 (19) 0.08 (13) 0.09 (14) 0.12 (19) 0.07 (12) 0.35 (56) 0.51 (82) 0.50 (81) 0.52 (84) 0.59 (96) 0.53 (87) 0.58 (95) 0.53 (87) 0.58 (94) 0.19 (30) 0.20 (32) 0.31 (51) 0.30 (48) 0.33 (54) 0.24 (39) 0.37 (61) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.04 (0) (6) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.03 (0) (5) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Physical SurroundingsSurvey Item This school building is kept clean. This school has up-to-date computers and other electronic equipment available to students. This school is physically attractive (well designed, nicely decorated, etc.). We have space and facilities for extra-curricular activities at this school. We need more basic supplies in school (for example, books, paper and chalk).* This school building is kept in good condition.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.01 (1) 0.05 (8) 0.01 (2) 0.02 (4) 0.18 (29) 0.01 (1) 0.02 (3) 0.09 (14) 0.11 (18) 0.08 (13) 0.39 (64) 0.01 (2) 0.03 (5) 0.04 (7) 0.12 (20) 0.11 (18) 0.23 (38) 0.04 (6) 0.40 (65) 0.52 (84) 0.51 (83) 0.47 (77) 0.11 (18) 0.52 (85) 0.55 (89) 0.29 (48) 0.23 (38) 0.28 (45) 0.07 (11) 0.42 (69) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.04 (0) (6) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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Item-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given

LeadershipSurvey Item The administration at this school is fair in the way they allocate resources. The administration at this school provides teachers with opportunities to work together collaboratively. Most teachers at this school feel comfortable asking for help from the administration. The administration at this school places a high priority on curriculum and instructional issues. The administration involves teachers in planning professional development activities. The work I do at this school is appreciated by the administration. The administration at this school communicates openly with teachers and staff. The administration at this school is supportive of teachers and staff members. The administration at this school involves staff in decisions about instruction. The administration at this school effectively communicates a strong and compelling vision for what they want the school to be. The administration at this school is accessible to teachers and staff. The administration at this school involves staff in decisions about the school discipline policy. The administration at this school places a high priority on developing staff expertise.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.01 (2) 0.06 (9) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.13 (21) 0.07 (11) 0.02 (4) 0.02 (4) 0.04 (6) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (2) 0.03 (5) 0.04 (6) 0.12 (19) 0.21 (35) 0.17 (27) 0.04 (6) 0.20 (32) 0.06 (10) 0.14 (23) 0.07 (11) 0.15 (25) 0.07 (12) 0.06 (9) 0.20 (32) 0.09 (14) 0.18 (30) 0.17 (27) 0.20 (32) 0.10 (17) 0.20 (32) 0.21 (34) 0.12 (20) 0.14 (23) 0.30 (49) 0.17 (28) 0.06 (9) 0.27 (44) 0.28 (45) 0.46 (75) 0.34 (56) 0.37 (61) 0.40 (65) 0.31 (51) 0.48 (77) 0.53 (87) 0.48 (79) 0.35 (57) 0.54 (88) 0.56 (91) 0.35 (57) 0.46 (74) 0.22 (36) 0.15 (25) 0.20 (32) 0.42 (69) 0.07 (11) 0.19 (30) 0.17 (28) 0.27 (44) 0.09 (14) 0.19 (31) 0.30 (48) 0.08 (13) 0.13 (21) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.07 (0) (11) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.03 (0) (5) 0.00 0.09 (0) (15) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.07 (0) (12) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.07 (0) (12) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: School PersonnelRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Professional RelationshipsSurvey Item Staff in this school typically work well with one another. Most staff in this school are generous about helping others with instructional issues. Staff in this school try to learn from one another. Staff members typically treat one another with professional respect. Most staff seem comfortable asking for help from their colleagues. Staff in the school seem comfortable sharing ideas at staff/faculty meetings. I feel good about what I accomplish as a staff member at this school. Working relationships among staff in this school make it easier to try new things. Staff in this school generally trust one another. Most staff in this school are good at the work they do.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 2/5 2/5 1/5 2/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 2/5 2/5 0.01 (2) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (1) 0.00 (0) 0.01 (2) 0.01 (1) 0.01 (2) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.02 (4) 0.02 (3) 0.06 (9) 0.02 (4) 0.02 (3) 0.10 (16) 0.02 (4) 0.06 (10) 0.04 (6) 0.01 (1) 0.04 (6) 0.07 (12) 0.08 (13) 0.05 (8) 0.05 (8) 0.13 (22) 0.03 (5) 0.12 (19) 0.21 (35) 0.05 (8) 0.55 (90) 0.42 (69) 0.58 (95) 0.55 (89) 0.56 (92) 0.51 (84) 0.50 (82) 0.50 (82) 0.53 (87) 0.49 (80) 0.36 (59) 0.43 (70) 0.26 (43) 0.37 (61) 0.36 (58) 0.20 (33) 0.43 (71) 0.27 (44) 0.21 (34) 0.44 (71) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.06 (0) (9) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.01 (0) (2) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.04 (0) (7) 0.00 0.01 (0) (1) 0.00 0.02 (0) (3) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsSafety Rules & NormsSurvey Item In my childs school, there are clear rules against physically hurting other people (for example, hitting, pushing or tripping). Adults in the school are fair about making sure that all students follow the rules against physically hurting other people. Adults in the school will stop students if they see them physically hurting each other (for example, pushing, slapping, or punching). In my childs school, there are clear rules against insults, teasing, harassment, and other verbal abuse. Adults in the school are fair about making sure that all students follow the rules against insults, teasing, harassment, or other verbal abuse. Adults in the school stop students if they see them insulting, teasing, harassing, or otherwise verbally abusing other students.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.01 (7) 0.02 (10) 0.01 (4) 0.01 (6) 0.03 (15) 0.01 (7) 0.02 (11) 0.04 (21) 0.01 (7) 0.05 (25) 0.06 (31) 0.03 (17) 0.10 0.60 (55) (325) 0.26 0.52 (141) (279) 0.30 0.47 (164) (252) 0.15 0.59 (81) (319) 0.36 0.46 (196) (250) 0.41 0.43 (222) (230) 0.26 (143) 0.16 (87) 0.21 (111) 0.20 (106) 0.09 (46) 0.11 (59) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsSense of Physical SecuritySurvey Item I have seen students at my childs school being physically hurt by other students more than once (for example, pushed, slapped, punched, or beaten up).* My child feels physically safe in the schoolyard or area right around the school. My child has been physically hurt at school more than once by other students (for example, pushed, slapped, punched, or beaten up).* My child feels physically safe in all areas of the school building. There are areas of my childs school where he/she does not feel physically safe.*

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 2.00 4.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.41 (220) 0.01 (6) 0.53 (287) 0.01 (4) 0.27 (142) 0.40 (217) 0.02 (12) 0.37 (201) 0.03 (16) 0.53 (285) 0.16 (85) 0.02 (12) 0.01 (6) 0.23 (122) 0.01 (8) 0.21 (113) 0.01 (4) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.11 0.63 (58) (342) 0.06 (32) 0.02 (11)

0.12 0.64 (62) (344) 0.14 (76) 0.05 (27)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Sense of Social-Emotional SecuritySurvey Item Many students at my childs school go out of their way to treat other students badly.* My child has been insulted, teased, harassed or otherwise verbally abused more than once at this school.* There are many students in my childs school who seem to be made fun of a lot by other students.* Most students in my childs school act in a way that is sensitive to the feelings of other students. Students at my childs school will try to stop students from insulting or making fun of other students. Very few students make fun of other students. There are groups of students in the school who exclude others and make them feel bad for not being a part of the group.* It is common to see students in my childs school insulted, teased, harassed or otherwise verbally abused by other students.* Most students in my childs school try to treat other students the way theyd want to be treated.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Response Rating Disagree Agree Know 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.08 (44) 0.26 (141) 0.06 (33) 0.02 (12) 0.04 (24) 0.08 (41) 0.03 (17) 0.18 (98) 0.02 (9) 0.43 (234) 0.39 (210) 0.28 (153) 0.11 (59) 0.12 (62) 0.19 (102) 0.12 (64) 0.39 (206) 0.10 (52) 0.34 (181) 0.14 (73) 0.46 (248) 0.12 (64) 0.15 (83) 0.15 (82) 0.03 (16) 0.06 (32) 0.04 (22) 0.04 (23) 0.04 (24) 0.03 (15) 0.13 (67) 0.02 (12) 0.06 (30) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.37 0.45 (201) (245) 0.51 0.28 (276) (152) 0.49 0.22 (261) (117) 0.44 0.28 (235) (150) 0.32 (172) 0.09 (46)

0.29 0.53 (157) (285)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Support for LearningSurvey Item My childs teachers encourage him/her to try out new ideas (think independently). My childs teachers let him/her know when he/she does a good job. If my child is feeling confused about something in class, he/she feels comfortable saying so. Teachers give my child an opportunity to show what he/she knows and can do in a variety of ways (for example, papers, presentations, projects, tests). My child is challenged to do more than he/she thought he/she could in school. My childs teachers give him/her useful feedback on school work. My childs teachers encourage him/her to see mistakes as a natural part of the learning process. My childs teachers show him/her how to learn from his/her mistakes. My childs teachers help him/her figure out how he/she learns best. My childs teachers give him/her individual attention on schoolwork.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.02 (11) 0.01 (6) 0.05 (25) 0.03 (14) 0.03 (18) 0.03 (14) 0.03 (18) 0.03 (16) 0.06 (34) 0.05 (27) 0.08 (42) 0.07 (40) 0.24 (131) 0.08 (41) 0.11 (62) 0.15 (79) 0.13 (67) 0.13 (70) 0.21 (111) 0.14 (76) 0.24 0.53 (129) (288) 0.25 0.55 (133) (296) 0.20 0.44 (109) (240) 0.14 0.59 (77) (316) 0.26 0.46 (141) (249) 0.21 0.54 (114) (289) 0.35 0.43 (189) (231) 0.38 0.42 (202) (224) 0.38 0.30 (203) (161) 0.24 0.49 (131) (260) 0.13 (70) 0.12 (64) 0.06 (35) 0.17 (92) 0.13 (70) 0.08 (43) 0.05 (29) 0.04 (24) 0.04 (23) 0.08 (42) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social and Civic LearningSurvey Item In my childs school, he/she talks about ways to help control his/her emotions. In my childs school, students have learned ways to resolve disagreements so that everyone can be satisfied with the outcome. In my childs school, he/she talks about the way his/her actions will affect others. In my childs school, he/she discusses issues that help him/her think about how to be a good person. In my childs school, he/she discusses issues that help him/her think about what is right and wrong. My child has learned skills that help him/her plan time effectively to get work done and still do other things he/she enjoys. In my childs school, he/she talks about the importance of understanding his/her feelings and the feelings of others. In my childs school, he/she works on listening to others so that he/she really understands what they are trying to say. My child feels that he/she is better at working with other people because of what he/she has learned in school.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.03 (16) 0.02 (9) 0.01 (4) 0.01 (4) 0.01 (4) 0.05 (29) 0.01 (8) 0.01 (3) 0.01 (5) 0.16 (84) 0.12 (67) 0.14 (74) 0.12 (65) 0.08 (45) 0.19 (103) 0.12 (64) 0.04 (19) 0.11 (59) 0.60 0.19 (322) (100) 0.50 0.33 (271) (178) 0.45 0.36 (243) (192) 0.38 0.45 (206) (242) 0.41 0.44 (221) (240) 0.20 0.46 (106) (251) 0.48 0.33 (260) (179) 0.33 0.56 (177) (298) 0.46 0.39 (244) (207) 0.03 (14) 0.02 (13) 0.05 (25) 0.04 (23) 0.06 (30) 0.09 (51) 0.05 (27) 0.07 (37) 0.03 (18) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Respect for DiversitySurvey Item Students in my childs school respect each others differences (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Students in my childs school respect differences in adults (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in my childs school respect differences in students (for example, gender, race, culture, etc.). Adults in my childs school respect each others differences (for example gender, race, culture, etc.).

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.02 (11) 0.01 (4) 0.01 (3) 0.01 (4) 0.09 (50) 0.04 (22) 0.04 (23) 0.03 (14) 0.25 0.56 (134) (300) 0.30 0.57 (161) (305) 0.24 0.57 (130) (309) 0.36 0.49 (193) (265) 0.08 (45) 0.08 (45) 0.14 (73) 0.11 (61) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsRating Response Given Rating Response Not Given Social Support / AdultsSurvey Item Adults who work in my childs school treat students with respect. Adults in my childs school seem to work well with one another. Adults in my childs school have high expectations for students success. Adults who work in my childs school treat one another with respect. Adults in my childs school seem to trust one another. If students need to talk to an adult in school about a problem, there is someone they trust who they could talk to. Adults in my childs school are willing to listen to what students have to say. Adults in my childs school are interested in getting to know students.

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.00 (2) 0.01 (8) 0.01 (8) 0.01 (6) 0.01 (7) 0.03 (17) 0.02 (9) 0.01 (6) 0.07 (39) 0.08 (42) 0.04 (20) 0.05 (25) 0.05 (26) 0.10 (54) 0.08 (41) 0.09 (50) 0.18 0.59 (96) (318) 0.30 0.54 (160) (290) 0.18 0.57 (99) (306) 0.32 0.53 (171) (283) 0.39 0.49 (210) (260) 0.21 0.55 (110) (295) 0.30 0.53 (159) (286) 0.34 0.48 (183) (256) 0.16 (86) 0.07 (39) 0.20 (107) 0.10 (54) 0.06 (33) 0.11 (60) 0.07 (40) 0.07 (40) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsSocial Support / StudentsSurvey Item Students have friends at school they can turn to if they have questions about homework. Students have friends at school they can trust and talk to if they have problems. Students in my childs school work well with each other even if theyre not in the same group of friends. Students have friends at school to eat lunch with. Students try to make new students feel welcome in the school.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.01 (5) 0.01 (6) 0.03 (16) 0.03 (15) 0.03 (17) 0.04 (24) 0.05 (28) 0.12 (63) 0.05 (29) 0.06 (34) 0.11 0.60 (61) (324) 0.16 0.62 (89) (337) 0.32 0.47 (172) (256) 0.18 0.63 (95) (332) 0.46 0.39 (245) (205) 0.23 (126) 0.15 (81) 0.06 (32) 0.11 (60) 0.06 (30) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsSchool Connectedness / EngagementSurvey Item My childs school tries to get students to join in after school activities. My childs school tries to get all families to be part of school activities. My child feels like he/she belongs at this school. My child likes his/her school. My childs school makes an effort to keep me and my family informed about whats going on in school. My child feels good about what he/she accomplishes in school. Parents and family members feel comfortable talking to teachers. I think parents/guardians feel welcome at my childs school.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.03 (15) 0.03 (15) 0.04 (19) 0.04 (21) 0.03 (18) 0.01 (5) 0.04 (19) 0.02 (13) 0.14 (78) 0.19 (104) 0.09 (48) 0.08 (42) 0.11 (60) 0.10 (54) 0.09 (46) 0.07 (37) 0.29 0.42 (157) (227) 0.26 0.42 (140) (226) 0.16 0.51 (85) (275) 0.13 0.54 (68) (293) 0.14 0.52 (78) (278) 0.15 0.61 (79) (328) 0.15 0.60 (81) (320) 0.16 0.60 (85) (324) 0.12 (64) 0.10 (56) 0.21 (114) 0.21 (116) 0.19 (105) 0.14 (73) 0.13 (69) 0.15 (79) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

Copyright 2006 by the National School Climate Center (NSCC).

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VI. Detailed FindingsItem-by-Item Survey Responses: ParentsPhysical SurroundingsSurvey Item My childs school building is kept clean. My childs school has up-to-date computers and other electronic equipment available to students. My childs school is physically attractive (well designed, nicely decorated, etc.). My childs school has space and facilities for extra-curricular activities. We need more basic supplies in my childs school (for example, books, paper and chalk).* My childs school building is kept in good condition.

Rating Response Given

Rating Response Not Given

Median Strongly Strongly Don't Missing Min/Max Disagree Neutral Agree N/A Rating Disagree Agree Know Response 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 4.00 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 1/5 0.00 (2) 0.03 (17) 0.02 (12) 0.02 (11) 0.15 (79) 0.01 (6) 0.03 (18) 0.06 (35) 0.09 (46) 0.07 (37) 0.35 (189) 0.04 (22) 0.12 0.66 (63) (357) 0.16 0.55 (87) (300) 0.20 0.55 (107) (299) 0.10 0.61 (53) (331) 0.41 (222) 0.07 (40) 0.19 (100) 0.19 (102) 0.14 (77) 0.20 (107) 0.01 (8) 0.17 (91) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 0.00 (0) (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0) 0.00 (0)

0.11 0.67 (59) (359)

* For this item, a higher score indicates a negative perception rather than a positive one. This has been taken into account in analyzing survey results and creating scale scores for other parts of the report.

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VI. Detailed FindingsDemographic Profiles

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APPENDIX AFurther Details on the CSCI MeasureTheCSCIasameasureisintendedtoprovideinformation aboutschoolclimateasspecificallymeasuredbyten scalescorrespondingtotenimportantdimensionsof schoolclimateSafety-Rules&Norms,SenseofPhysical Security,SenseofSocial-EmotionalSecurity,Supportfor Learning,Social&CivicLearning,RespectforDiversity, SocialSupportAdults,SocialSupportStudents,School Connectedness/Engagement,andPhysicalSurroundings. Forschoolpersonneltherearetwoadditionalscales thatarerelevanttoschoolclimateLeadershipand ProfessionalRelationships.Eachofthesescalesconsists ofaparticularsubsetofindividualsurveyitems. Althoughthelastsectionofthereportprovidesfulldetails onhoweachgrouprespondedtotheindividualsurvey items,thesurveywasdevelopedtobemostreliableat thescalelevel.Thescalescoresdependonanindividuals responsetoanumberofitemsthattogetherrevealthe perceptionsofagivenaspectofschoolclimate. Informationontheindividualsurveyitemsisincluded inordertoshowyouwhatkindsofindicatorsareused tomeasureeachdimension.However,responseto anindividualitemislessreliable,andNSCCdoesnot recommendmakingpolicydecisionsbasedonthese numbersalone.Therefore,thefindingsarediscussed onthescalelevelthroughoutthereport,anditis recommendedthatyouconcentrateonthescalescores fordiscussionandplanning. Thescaleordimensionscoresforeachrespondentare calculatedastheaveragescoreacrosstheseitems. Averagesratherthantotalscoresareusedtopromote understandingandusability.Withaveragescores,allscale scoresarecomparabletooneanotherregardlessofthe numberofitemsthatcontributetothatscore.Scores rangefrom1to5asdotheratingsforindividualitems. However,sincethescalescoresarecalculatedasaverage ratingsacrossallofthesurveyitemsthatarepartofthat scale,individualrespondentsscalescoreswillnolonger beinthefiveoriginalneatcategoriescorrespondingtothe responsecategoriesfrom1to5,butwillvaryfrom1to5 infractionalterms;forexampleifanindividualrespondent rated5itemsona10-itemscaleas3orneutraland 5as4orpositive,thescalescorefortherespondent wouldbe3.5.)Thisalsohelpsintheinterpretabilityof thescalescores.Indevelopingthescalescores,any respondentswhodidnotrespondtoallitemsinthescale werenotgivenascalescore.Thisensuresthatthescale scoreswerebasedonthesameitemsforeachperson. Tounderstandthemeaningofscalescores,scorescanbe considered as highly negative to highly positive according towheretheyfallonthecontinuumfrom1to5,with scoresbelow2.5indicatingarelativelynegativerating, scores above 3.5 relatively positive and those in the middle neutralthelowerthescoreinthenegativerange,the strongerthenegativejudgment;converselythehigher thescoreinthepositiverange,thestrongerthepositive judgment.

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APPENDIX AForschoolgroups,theoverallmeasurethatisreported isthemedianscore,whichisthemidpointoftherangeof scoresacrossallindividualrespondentsinthegroup.For example,amedianscoreof3.0forstudentsonSupport forLearningwouldindicatethattheoverallratingisfairly neutral,asmeasuredbythemidpointofrespondents whereanequalnumberrateSupportforLearningaslower and higher. Whilethisisslightlydifferentthanameanoraverage,itis oneofthecommonlyusedindicatorsofcentraltendency oroverallgroupperformance.Medianvaluesaretypically equivalenttomeanvalues,exceptwherethereareasmall numberofextremeratingswhichwouldskewthemean more than the median. Foraquestionnairethatusesafivepointratingscale, whileitisclearthatmostrespondentsinterprettheorder ofthescalethesameway,i.e.5ishigherthan4,and sooninthewaythattheyrespond,itisnotclearthat theintervalsbetweenratingsmeanthesamethingstoall respondents. Forthisreason,usingmedianvaluesacrossrespondents whichtakesintoaccountrankingbutnotactualratings,is consideredamoreappropriatemeasure.Inadditiontothe medianscores,thereportcontainsresponsedistributions foreachschoolclimatedimensions,whichshowthe percentageofrespondentsineachschoolgroupwhose scoresfallintoeachcategoryorrange. Theseshouldhelpyouunderstandtheconsistencyand/or variabilityofperceptionsandthestrengthofopinionwithin schoolgroups.Forexample,iftheoverallormedianscore forSupportforLearningforstudentsisneutral,isthat becausemostrespondentsareneutralorisitbecause thereareanevennumberwithpositiveandnegativeviews; ifthelatter,arepositiveandnegativeopinionssymmetrical orarethepositivesconcentratedaroundhighlypositive, whilenegativesarejustmildlyso,orviceversa. Eachofthesepatternsprovidesvaluableinsightintothe perceptionsheldbystudents,staffandparents,and differentpatternswillsuggestdifferentcoursesofaction.

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