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  • Upcoming Events

    • Thursday, Sept 4, 5:15-6:15 pm

    • B25 Warren Hall

    Interviewing Skills for International Students and Postdocs

    • Friday, Sept 12, 5-7 pm

    • Clark Atrium, Phys. Sci. Bldg. Mingling and Working the Room

    • Tuesday, Sept 9, noon-1 pm

    • 700 Clark Hall

    Preparing for the Career Fair: Approaches for Grad Students &

    Postdocs

    • Sept 16 and 17, 10 am-3 pm

    • Barton Hall University-Wide Career Fair Days

    • Wednesday, Oct 1, noon-1 pm

    • 102 Mann

    Envisioning Yourself Outside of Academia: First Steps for Grad

    Students & Postdocs

    • Wednesday, Oct 8, noon-1 pm

    • 102 Mann

    Cornell’s Non-Academic Career Resources

  • CV to Resume

    Christine Holmes

    Director of Post-Doctoral Studies, Caldwell Hall

    ch18@cornell.edu

    Anne Poduska, PhD

    Graduate & International Student Career Advisor

    Cornell Career Services (Barnes Hall)

    ap284@cornell.edu

    mailto:ch18@cornell.edu

  • Where Can You Go For Help With Your Career?

    • Workshops and Events

    Graduate School Program Chart

    CCS Event Calendar

    CCNet

    • Websites

    Cornell Career Services

    College career office

    • Career Offices

    http://www.gradschool.cornell.edu/professional-development-events http://www.career.cornell.edu/career/events/calendar.cfm http://www.career.cornell.edu/career/events/calendar.cfm https://cornell-students.experience.com/experience/login http://www.career.cornell.edu/career/

  • Career Services:

    Research Master’s and PhD students

    • Agriculture and Life Sciences: 140 Roberts

    • Engineering: 201 Carpenter

    • Hotel: 180 Statler

    • ILR: 201 Ives

    • University-wide: 103 Barnes

    Professional master’s students: Contact your program’s office

  • Career Services:

    Postdocs

    Graduate Students Interested in a Postdoc

    Christine Holmes

    Director of Post-Doctoral Studies

    Caldwell Hall

    ch18@cornell.edu

  • PhD Comic, Piled Higher and Deeper by Jorge Cham, phdcomics.com

  • • Describe previous experiences

    • Used by employers to decide whether to interview you

    • Used during interviews to formulate questions

    Purpose of CV and Resume

    CV

    History, education,

    accomplishments

    Resume

    Skills and abilities

  • CV

    History, education,

    accomplishments

    Resume

    Skills and abilities

    Academia:

    Job title (Professor)

    Subjects (American

    history)

    Outside of Academia

    What you’ve done and

    could do

    (transferable skills)

    Redefining Yourself

  • Not all jobs outside of academia

    require a resume.

    Some require a CV.

    Caveat

  • CV Resume

    Where Academia

    Employers outside of

    the US

    US employment: private

    sector, government, and

    non profit

    Exceptions US federal Government

    (PhD. Level)

    International

    Organization in US

    Development

    consulting firms

    Think Tank

    Content Full list of qualifications Summary of Qualifications

    Length As long as you need 1-2 pages

    Style Not important Very important

  • • Check with the employer

    • Confirm with others in the field

    • Create a CV that details your skills; include a fu ll or partial

    publication list

    If a US employer asks for a CV…

  • CV to Resume: Conceptual Shift

    My degree and

    publications are the main

    reasons why I’ll get a job

    The skills I acquired while I

    got my graduate degree will

    help me get a job

    My activities that are

    unrelated to teaching,

    research, and publishing

    are unimportant

    Outside activities are

    valuable because they

    demonstrate skills and

    interests

    There’s one way to view

    myself—as a PhD in X

    field—and my CV

    represents that one view.

    There are many ways to

    view myself and my

    abilities, depending on the

    type of job I’d like.

  • 1. Resumes have d ifferent structure than CVs

    2. There’s d ifferent ways you can represent yourself on a

    resume

    3. You need to break down your CV’s job titles and

    accomplishments into action verbs

    4. You have to understand what an employer wants when you

    make your resume

    5. You’ll need d ifferent resumes for d ifferent jobs.

    Consequences of This Conceptual Shift

  • 1. Resumes have different structure than CVs

    2. There’s d ifferent ways you can represent yourself on a

    resume

    3. You need to break down your CV’s job titles and

    accomplishments into action verbs

    4. You have to understand what an employer wants when you

    make your resume

    5. You’ll need d ifferent resumes for d ifferent jobs

    Consequences of This Conceptual Shift

  • Curriculum Vitae

    Resume

    Content

    Education Research/Teaching Interests Thesis/Dissertation Grants and Other Awards Research Experience Teaching Experience Practical Experience Employment Consulting Internships Publications Conference Presentations Languages Computer/Technical Skills References Not typically tailored by position

    Education Summary/Objective Statement (?) Select Grants and Awards Experience Select Publications Select Presentations Languages Computer/Technical Skills Very tailored by position

  • • Do you need it?

    • First (and easiest) place to ad just for job ad

    Seeking a responsible position in an industry lab doing

    research.

    Plant Scientist with 5 years of experience managing multiple

    projects in the following areas:

    – Automation and high throughput plant handling systems

    – Supervision of lab personnel

    – Management of lab budget

    Summary/Objective Statement

  • 1. Resumes have d ifferent structure than CVs

    2. There’s different ways you can represent yourself on a

    resume

    3. You need to break down your CV’s job titles and

    accomplishments into action verbs

    4. You have to understand what an employer wants when you

    make your resume

    5. You’ll need d ifferent resumes for d ifferent jobs.

    Consequences of This Conceptual Shift

  • • Chronological

    • Functional

    • Combination

    How Is a Resume Structured?

  • Format:

    • Most widely used style

    • Information presented in reverse chronological order

    Uses:

    • Highlights progressive work experience

    • Best for those who have significant experience in the field

    where they are seeking a job

    Problems:

    • Less effective if changing careers or have little work

    experience

    • Older but relevant experience may be overlooked

    Resume Type: Chronological

  • • See page 55 of Career Guide

    Resume Type: Chronological

  • Format:

    • Experiences are grouped by skills (e.g. leadership

    skills, communication skills)

    • The titles and dates of the experiences are listed at the

    top or bottom of the resume

    Uses:

    • Good for those changing careers or who have little

    work experience or gaps in employment

    Problems:

    • It can be confusing because the relationship between

    a skill and an experience can be lost

    Resume Type: Functional

  • • See page 47 of Career Guide

    Resume Type: Functional

  • Format:

    • Experiences are given in reverse chronology but are

    arranged by type of experience (e.g. communication

    experience, leadership experience)

    Uses:

    • Accentuates your skills

    • Draws d irect parallels with skills in job ads

    • Helpful if you are applying for a wide range of jobs

    Problems:

    • Can be d ifficult to fit one experience into just one

    category

    Resume Type: Combination

  • • See page 48 of Career Guide

    Resume Type: Combination

  • 1. Resumes have d ifferent structure than CV

    2. There’s d ifferent ways you can represent yourself on a

    resume

    3. You need to break down your CV’s job titles and

    accomplishments into action verbs

    4. You have to understand what an employer wants when you

    make your resume

    5. You’ll need d ifferent resumes for d ifferent jobs.

    Consequences of This Conceptual Shift

  • I reviewed 15 PhD applications, wrote a one-paragraph sum

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