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  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    The Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1 at

    Cirencester Camera Club on

    Monday 25th September 2017

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Plan of Attack

    Part 1: 25th Sept.

    • Style of portraits

    • Lighting

    • Framing

    • Technical choices

    • Equipment

    • Inspiration

    Part 2: 23rd Oct.

    • Lighting setups

    • Angle of light

    • Height of light

    • Type of light

    • Other factors

    Part 3: 29th Jan.

    • Posing & working with a model or subject

    • Framing

    • Focus

    • Styling

    • Practical photography with a model?

    Part 4: 26th Feb.

    • Global post-processing

    • Retouching

    • Q & A

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Portrait Photography

    Origin and Etymology of Portrait: Middle French, from past participle of ‘portraire’ - to portray.

    A photograph of a person. Capturing the personality of the subject by using effective lighting, backdrops and poses. Often it is desirable to capture the subject's eyes and face in sharp focus while allowing other less important elements to be rendered in a soft focus.

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Types of Portrait Photography

    Constructionalist When the photographer constructs an idea around the portrait - hard man/woman, intellectual or a trustworthy executive for example. It is the approach used in most studio and social photography. It is also used extensively in advertising and marketing when an idea has to be put across.

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Types of Portrait Photography

    Environmental Depicting the subject in an environment, be that a work, leisure, social or family one. They are often shown as doing something, an artist in a studio, a child in a playground. With the environmental approach more can be revealed about the subject. Environmental pictures can have good historical and social significance as primary sources of information.

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Types of Portrait Photography

    Candid Where people are photographed without their knowledge going about their daily business. Street photography, wedding & event photography can all be good examples of the candid style and like environmental portraiture, is important as a historical source of information.

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Style of Portraits High Key Losing detail in the highlights.

    Mid Key Keeping detail in both the highlights & shadows.

    Low Key Losing detail in the shadows.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Style of Portraits High Key - Variations Top row by photographed by me, bottom row thanks to various sources online.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Style of Portraits Mid Key - Variations Top row by photographed by me, bottom row thanks to various sources online.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Style of Portraits Low Key - Variations Top row by photographed by me, bottom row thanks to various sources online.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Lighting Controlling Considerations

    Light is what allows us to see. It is what shapes and colours every object we can see with out eyes, it creates depth, mood, and colour. The word photography comes from ‘photo’ = ‘light’ and ‘graphy’ = ‘writing’, so photography essentially means ‘light writing’. There are 5 main things to think about when you are controlling light:

    1. Exposure - how bright or dark the image is or needs to be

    2. Quality - how focused or diffused the light is, how hard or soft to use other terms

    3. Colour - the colour of the light in an image, setting the WB correctly to ensure correct colours

    4. Direction - what angle the light is coming from and where the shadows fall

    5. Contrast - the difference between the highlights and the shadows

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    1. Exposure The overall exposure of an image gives it a feeling, a different response from the viewer.

    The darker the image - the more ominous, scary or moody the portrait will feel. The lighter the image - the more dreamy, friendly or romantic the portrait will feel.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    2. Quality Basically how hard or soft the light is.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    3. Colour The temperature of the lights, diffusers or gels being used will effect how the subject is coloured. So setting your white balance, in camera or in post, is essential. Shooting RAW allows you more flexibility and using a grey card or colour passport allows you to sample colours to cool or warm them up.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    4. Direction What angle the light is coming from and where the shadows fall. Adding drama and shape to the face.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    5. Contrast Basically a combination of most of the previous considerations, the exposure, the quality, the direction, all add up to the amount of contrast in the image. How much shape is shown and how strong the differences are between the highlights and the shadows, as well as where they are on the face. Trying to avoid midtonitus - if images are too flat, they lose shape and often interest too.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Framing choices Full body, 3/4 body, 1/2 body, shoulders and head, face or cropped in to the face. There is no right or wrong here really, there can be good and bad treatments, as well as badly framed or cropped images - but as with the lighting the framing of the subject can convey different feelings to the viewer.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Orientation Usually a portrait is shot in ‘Portrait’ orientation - shock, but ‘Landscape’ orientation works just as well but with more online ‘Profile’ style images being used the ‘Square’ format also needs to be considered and embraced.

  • Presented by Richard Sudbury www.richardsudbury.com www.facebook.com/richardsudburycreative

    Basics of Portrait Photography - Part 1

    Technical Camera Settings Focus - Usually in auto, single point, on the closest eye to the camera...as a starting point.

    Depth of Field - Aperture is set to create a completely black image with no lights firing...ambient light is removed, so the depth of field is dependent on that - but ambient light can be removed in other ways too, so you can have a shallower depth of field if you want it.

    Shutter Speed - 1/160s is my starting point, as the Canon’s highest sync speed with my Bowens lights is that.

    ISO - Always set to the camera’s native ISO, lowest usually - around 100, to give the least amount of noise and the sharpest images.

    White Balance - Set in camera at 5600k, as that is roughly my lights temperature - give or take 200k, a grey card shot can be used to eye dropper in Lightroom to get