sooke news m irror

28
BENEFIT FOR BOBBIE JO Local musicians are rallying to support local woman. Page 13 COURT ACTION There is talk about forming a men’s basketball league. Page 24 Your community, your classifieds P26 • Wednesday, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 13 Sports/stats Page 24 Agreement #40110541 SOOKE SOOKE NEWS 2010 WINNER MIRROR Sooke man lucky to be alive after watery car crash Pirjo Raits Sooke News Mirror R on Hamilton knows he is lucky to be alive and he is grateful. Hamilton, was travelling along Sooke Road, at the four lanes, when his life took an unexpected turn. It was Jan. 26 at 8:30 a.m. when Hamilton’s Ford Fusion hit black ice. There was no salt, no sand to pre- vent his car from skidding off the highway into a creek. The recent rains had likely washed it all away. “I went across two lanes and my car was air borne. I hit my head and my car was completely submerged,” said Hamilton days after the crash. He was knocked out briefly and when he came to his car was underwater and he was struggling to breathe. The creek itself is not that deep, but deep enough to bury the front of his car in the water. His thoughts were fuzzy but he knew he didn’t want to die drowning. He had popped into the back seat after the collision and when he realized the water was staying in the car, he strug- gled to find an air pocket. “Don’t panic,” was his first thought, he said. “I don’t know how long I was out but I was within two sec- onds of drowning.” Luckily for Hamilton, there were other drivers out on the road and a call was made to 9-1-1. Just as things looked really bleak Hamilton man- aged to kick out the window and find the door handle to let himself out. “My hands were so numb it was hard to feel things,” he said. He may have gotten out by himself but he is forever thankful to the West Shore RCMP and a civilian who came onto the scene and jumped into the creek with- out hesitation. “This is what they are all about — jumping in with- out hesitation,” said Ham- ilton. “The cops reacted, they didn’t take anything off, even their guns.” By this time Hamilton was vibrating he was shaking so bad. He was lucky, he missed a telephone pole by about six to seven feet and the fact that his car was a four-door. Hamilton moved to Sooke last July from Mission and is amazed at the selfless actions of the RCMP team who came to his aid. He knows that a number of factors allowed him to survive. He talked about the need not to panic in such situa- tions. “My dad always said to me, ‘don’t panic.’” And his father knew what he was talking about. Hamilton’s father was a bush pilot and was once lost for a month in the bleak and barren reaches of northern Sas- katchewan. “He was flying from gas depot to gas depot and he went off course.” Black ice is dangerous and is present on many cold and clear mornings. You can’t see it and you can’t stop on it. Even the ambulance driver who showed up at the accident scene came to a sliding stop. “Everybody tells me that is a vicious part of the high- way,” said Hamilton. Hamilton was taken to hos- pital and checked out. He was hypothermic and had a large bump on his head but other than that he was okay and lucky to be alive. “I just want to say thank you to the police and the other guy.” Submitted photo Ron Hamilton is rescued from the icy creek by West Shore RCMP members and a passerby. T’Sou-ke Nation will lead the way in food security and sustainability with new project Pirjo Raits Sooke News Mirror Sustainability and food security are paramount in the lives of the T’Sou-ke people, says Chief Gordon Planes. On Jan. 29 Minister of Energy and Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing, Rich Coleman, announced $1-million in funding for the Sustain- able Community Greenhouse Proj- ect being initiated by the T’Sou-ke First Nation. The project involves the construc- tion and operation of a commercial- sized greenhouse on four acres on T’Sou-ke land. The project will dem- onstrate and introduce a new heat- ing and cooling technology which is an extension of the solar project on the reserve. “Since time immemorial, food security has been an essential part of Coast Salish peoples everyday lives,” says Planes. “We knew that staying in balance with Mother Earth and the gifts she has given us, insured our survival for our children and our children not yet born.” Andrew Moore, speaking for the band, said they wanted their own energy and to be self-sufficient in food production and for it to fit in as culturally appropriate. “All of our projects involve train- ing and economic development,” said Moore. The project, once fully financed, will result in a combination com- mercial greenhouse and a place to grow native plants which are cultur- ally appropriate for the band. They will grow and market tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and flowers. The band will need to raise another $3-million through a mix of public and private funding sources. This project is part of T’Sou-ke Nation’s aim to become more sus- tainable and economically self suffi- cient. The project will create 25 full- time employment positions during construction and 40 full-time jobs on completion in growing, market- ing and distribution. The technology that will be uti- lized will help shift large fossil fuel users to transition to clean renew- able power. “Today we have the opportunity to give back to Mother Earth again, to practice the ways of our ances- tors and the teaching of walking lightly on the land through energy conservation and local food pro- duction. That we can do this and create much needed jobs and train- ing makes this an exciting project for the whole T’Sou-ke community,” said Planes. On Vancouver Island only about four per cent of the food consumed is grown on island and most food travels over 1,000 kms to get to the table. Moore said they are pleased with the Ministry of Energy Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing’s contribution to the project. “It’s a vote of confidence,” said Moore. 642-6480 Oliver Katz Personal Real Estate Corp. www.oliverkatz.com we look after you O Open House Sunday 1-3 P21 • 75 ¢

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Page 1: Sooke News M irror

BENEFIT FOR BOBBIE JO Local musicians are rallying

to support local woman.

Page 13

COURT ACTION There is talk about forming a

men’s basketball league.

Page 24

Your community, your classifi eds P26 • 75¢Wednesday, FEBRUARY 1, 2012

Editorial Page 8

Entertainment Page 13

Sports/stats Page 24

Agreement#40110541

SOOKESOOKE NEWS2010 WINNER

M I R R O R

Sooke man lucky to be alive after watery car crash Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

Ron Hamilton knowshe is lucky to be alive and he is

grateful. Hamilton, was travelling

along Sooke Road, at the four lanes, when his life tookan unexpected turn.

It was Jan. 26 at 8:30 a.m. when Hamilton’s Ford Fusion hit black ice. There was no salt, no sand to pre-vent his car from skidding off the highway into a creek. The recent rains had likelywashed it all away.

“I went across two lanesand my car was air borne. I hit my head and my car wascompletely submerged,” said Hamilton days after thecrash.

He was knocked out briefly and when he came to his car was underwater and he was struggling to breathe. The creek itself is not that deep, but deep enough to bury the front of his car in the water.

His thoughts were fuzzy but he knew he didn’t want to die drowning. He had popped into the back seat after the collision and when he realized the water was staying in the car, he strug-

gled to find an air pocket.“Don’t panic,” was his

first thought, he said. “I don’t know how long I was out but I was within two sec-onds of drowning.”

Luckily for Hamilton,

there were other drivers out on the road and a call was made to 9-1-1.

Just as things looked really bleak Hamilton man-aged to kick out the window and find the door handle to

let himself out.“My hands were so numb

it was hard to feel things,” he said.

He may have gotten out by himself but he is foreverthankful to the West Shore RCMP and a civilian whocame onto the scene and jumped into the creek with-out hesitation.

“This is what they are all about — jumping in with-out hesitation,” said Ham-ilton. “The cops reacted, they didn’t take anything off, even their guns.”

By this time Hamilton wasvibrating he was shaking so bad.

He was lucky, he missed a telephone pole by about sixto seven feet and the fact that his car was a four-door.

Hamilton moved to Sooke last July from Mission and is amazed at the selfless actions of the RCMP team who came to his aid. He knows that a number of factors allowed him to survive.

He talked about the need not to panic in such situa-

tions.“My dad always said to

me, ‘don’t panic.’” And his father knew what he wastalking about. Hamilton’s father was a bush pilot andwas once lost for a month in the bleak and barren reaches of northern Sas-katchewan.

“He was flying from gas depot to gas depot and he went off course.”

Black ice is dangerous and is present on many cold and clear mornings. You can’t see it and you can’t stop on it. Even the ambulancedriver who showed up at the accident scene came toa sliding stop.

“Everybody tells me thatis a vicious part of the high-way,” said Hamilton.

Hamilton was taken to hos-pital and checked out. He was hypothermic and had a large bump on his head but other than that he was okay and lucky to be alive.

“I just want to say thank you to the police and the other guy.”

Submitted photo

Ron Hamilton is rescued from the icy creek by West Shore RCMP members and a passerby.

T’Sou-ke Nation will lead the

way in food security and sustainability

with new project

Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

Sustainability and food security are paramount in the lives of the T’Sou-ke people, says Chief Gordon Planes.

On Jan. 29 Minister of Energy and Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing, Rich Coleman, announced $1-million in funding for the Sustain-able Community Greenhouse Proj-ect being initiated by the T’Sou-ke First Nation.

The project involves the construc-tion and operation of a commercial-sized greenhouse on four acres on T’Sou-ke land. The project will dem-onstrate and introduce a new heat-ing and cooling technology which is an extension of the solar project on

the reserve.“Since time immemorial, food

security has been an essential part of Coast Salish peoples everyday lives,” says Planes.

“We knew that staying in balance with Mother Earth and the gifts she has given us, insured our survival for our children and our children not yet born.”

Andrew Moore, speaking for the band, said they wanted their own energy and to be self-sufficient in food production and for it to fit in as culturally appropriate.

“All of our projects involve train-ing and economic development,” said Moore.

The project, once fully financed, will result in a combination com-mercial greenhouse and a place to

grow native plants which are cultur-ally appropriate for the band. They will grow and market tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and flowers.

The band will need to raise another $3-million through a mix of public and private funding sources.

This project is part of T’Sou-ke Nation’s aim to become more sus-tainable and economically self suffi-cient. The project will create 25 full-time employment positions during construction and 40 full-time jobs on completion in growing, market-ing and distribution.

The technology that will be uti-lized will help shift large fossil fuel users to transition to clean renew-able power.

“Today we have the opportunity to give back to Mother Earth again,

to practice the ways of our ances-tors and the teaching of walking lightly on the land through energy conservation and local food pro-duction. That we can do this and create much needed jobs and train-ing makes this an exciting project for the whole T’Sou-ke community,” said Planes.

On Vancouver Island only about four per cent of the food consumed is grown on island and most food travels over 1,000 kms to get to the table.

Moore said they are pleased with the Ministry of Energy Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing’s contribution to the project.

“It’s a vote of confidence,” said Moore.

642-6480 Oliver Katz Personal Real Estate Corp. www.oliverkatz.com

we look after you

OOpen House Sunday 1-3

P21 • 75¢

Page 2: Sooke News M irror

2 • www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

PRODUCEPRODUCE5-A-Day for Optimum Health

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www.westernfoods.comSenior’s Day Thursdays • Save 10% on Most Items

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2/500Island FarmsChocolate Milk 2L .......................

$349KraftPhiladelphia Dips 227g ........

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Your Community Food StoreYour Community Food Store

Western Angus

Beef Eye of RoundSteak8.80kg .............

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Fresh Farmhouse Poultry

ChickenDrumsticks3.95kg .............

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Fletchers

Sliced Cooked Ham375g...............

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Fresh, Great Tasting Meat

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Maxwell House Instant Coffee 200g ..............$599

Kraft Pure Jam 500ml .......................................$389

Hawkins Cheezies 210g ..................................2/300

Unico Tomatoes 796ml ....................................$139

Bick’s Mainline Dill Pickles 1L ..................$239

Catelli Healthy Harvest Pasta 300-375g ...2/400

Unico Premium Balsamic Vinegar 500ml ....$299

Lipton Onion Soup Mix 113g .....................2/400

Quaker Rice Cakes 100-214g ..............................2/300

Liberty Canola Oil 1L .....................................$249

Mr. Noodle Cup Noodles 64g ......................4/300

Heinz Upside Down Mustard 375ml .......2/300

Rogers Oat Flakes or Porridge Oats 1.35kg .$299

Christies Bits & Bites 200-225g ........................2/400

Dempsters Sesame Bagels 6’s .....................2/500

Silver Hills Flax Bread 615g ..............................$299

Lumberjack 7 Grain, 100% Whole Wheat or Sesame White Bread 680g .$229

Alpo Adult Dog Food 1.8kg ...........................$439

Friskies Stuffed Morsels Cat Food 1.5kg .$499

Purex Envirocare Double Roll Bathroom Tissue 12’s ...$699

Scotties Lotion Facial Tissue 70’s ................99¢

Javex Ultra Liquid Bleach 2.8L ..................$199

Durafl ame Giant Fire Logs 2.27kg .............$399

+ dep

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Western Angus Beef Eye of

Round Roast

“Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974”“Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974”

Garlic Cheese Bread

Arbutus Ridge

HumusShreddedParmesan

$299

Quality and Convenience

FROZEN FOODSFROZEN FOODSFROZEN FOODS

Fletchers Sliced Salami, Mock Chicken or

Bologna 175g ................................

$179Fletchers Naturally Smoked Reg. or Thick

Sliced Bacon500g .................................

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99¢

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79¢

Level GroundFair TradeCoffee

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NATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODS

Annies Organic

Fruit Snacks 115g ..... .............$279

Camino

Organic Juices 946ml .............$229

Whole Alternatives

Organic Popcorn 454g ...2/400

Annies Family Size

Shells & Cheddar 340g ..2/400

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Macaroni & Cheese 255g ..$299

Julies No Dairy Organic Frozen

Coconut Bars 267-472ml .......$449

89¢ $249

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BulkBulkFoodsFoodsBulkFoodsChocolate Bridge Mix 100g .......................................99¢

Jelly Beans100g .......................................59¢

Bits & Bites100g ......................................

$139

Salted or Unsalted Cashew Nuts 100g .

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8.36kg..........................................

Per 100g

Per 100g Per 100g

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KentOrange Juice 250ml ....................

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Wong WingWonton Soup 426g ...................

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Cool Whip

Dessert Topping 1L .................$299

Island Farms Country Cream orDenali Ice Cream 1.65L .......

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300g68g

Fresh Hand Peeled

Shrimp

$299

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Beef DipBuns

$219

100% Whole WheatBread454g

6’s

$189

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Chocolate or StrawberrySwirl Cheesecake600g

$349 $899

/ea

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Wild Sockeye

SalmonFillet

LANGFORD772 Goldstream Ave.Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

We reserve the right to limit quantities

lb/lb

Fat Free Turkey

+ dep

Family Pack Values

$429

CLIF Bars

Delissio Delissio

Rising CrustRising CrustPizzaPizzaVar. wts.

/lb

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Cherry Mini Strudels $3396’s6’s

2/2/10100000

525g

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General MillsCheerios

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Mott’sClamato Juice

375ml

Unico StuffedManzanilla Olives

2/300

2/400 220g

Old Dutch XLPotato ChipsPotato Chips

750-890ml

Hellman’sMayonnaise

AdamsPeanut Butter

Deep Cove Chunk orFlaked Light Tuna

540ml

$109

UnicoChick Peas or Beans

in water, 170g

79¢

10-12x355ml

2/800

All VarietiesCoca Cola

375ml

99¢

HeinzBBQ Sauce

12x355ml

$599

Molson ExelLo Alcohol Beer

Chef Boy Ar DeePasta425g

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2/500

Lays XLPotato Chips

326g

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Nabob TraditionCoffee

400g

$389

Christie Ritz or CheeseRitz Crackers

GatoradeSport Drink710ml

4/500

Per 100g

Avocadoes

Strawberries

OrganicCarrots

2/400

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69¢

Baby Peeled Carrots1lb bag............................99¢

Hot House Tomatoes2.18kg.............................99¢

Leeks2.84kg ................................

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Rose Potatoes3lb bag .............................

2/400

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Page 3: Sooke News M irror

Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

The regular January 23 meeting of the Dis-trict of Sooke council brought forth the fol-lowing decisions:

DelegationsSid Jorna came for-

ward representing the Juan de Fuca Commu-nity Trails Society to introduce the society to council. They cur-rently have 215 mem-bers. Hikes are regularly scheduled on the first Sunday of each month and new participants are welcome to join.

Phoebe Dunbar, rep-resenting Sooke Food CHI and the Sunriver Allotment Garden, came before coun-cil to request support for a funding request from Walmart Ever-green and Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA). The group also needed, in writing, the district’s permission to be on the site. Council agreed to write a letter of support.

Delegation Bylaw Amendments

Council adopted Bylaw No. 515 as pre-sented and waived the public hearing.

Mayor Wendal Milne said he saw the amend-ment as an “administra-tive change.”

The bylaw reduces the spending authoriza-tion of the Chief Admin-istrative Officer from $75,000 to $7,500.

BylawsCouncil adopted

Bylaw No. 513, Zon-

ing Amendment Bylaw (500-1). The purpose was to correct duplic-ity between two zones in Bylaw No. 500, Sooke Zoning Bylaw 2011.

Council gave first, second and third read-ing to Bylaw No. 516, Sooke Core Sewer Spec-ified Bylaw. The appli-cants applied to be included into the Sooke Core Sewer Specified Area because of a fail-ing septic field. This issue brought up the changes in zoning on a number of properties in the area. Some proper-ties were downzoned from R1 to RU4 which left the property own-ers unable to subdivide if they chose to.

Councillor Herb Hal-dane said it, “seems like a bit of a money grab,” and he didn’t see the rationale for changing the properties to RU4 zoning. He said the old zoning allowed a prop-erty owner to subdi-vide on a property of 1,000 sq. metres and the new zoning RU4 meant the property had to be at least one hectare before it could be subdivided.

ReportsCouncil granted the

Sooke Hospice Society $100 to go towards the application fee to erect a wooden sign at their Goodmere Road loca-tion. The sign bylaw does not allow a waiver of fees for non-profit groups and the only way to “waive” the fee was to give them the $100 from the Council

Contingency Fund.A report on the gar-

bage collection on municipal property and transit stops initi-ated discussion among council members. The District of Sooke pays $654.50 plus HST per month ($7,854/year) for garbage collection from parks, trails and tran-sit stops. Island Adver-tising Inc. pays Sooke $700/year to offset gar-bage collection costs on the 13 receptacles at transit stops. The report states that the district had to add on $200/month ($2,400/yr) to empty those recep-tacles.

Councillors Rick Kasper and Herb Hal-dane questioned the decision that was made to install the benches and garbage recep-tacles for such a small benefit to Sooke.

“This was done behind closed doors,” said Haldane in refer-

ence to the deal with Island Advertising Inc. “$700 is a crappy deal... locals should have done the work.”

Coun. Kasper said, “perhaps some bargain-ing should have been done. The dollars and cents don’t add up.”

Mayor Wendal Milne suggested a review of that contract.

CovenantsCouncil authorized

the release of a cov-enant registered to property located at 2260 Maple Avenue North and the execu-tion of the Option to Purchase/Right of First Refusal Agreement for the affordable housing unit on the property.

Council approved the sale of the afford-able housing unit at $160,000 which met the conditions of construc-tion by the developer. This the first affordable housing unit in Sooke and it was constructed

to the same standard and quality as the other units in the develop-ment.

The district now has right of first refusal if the property comes up for sale. The purchase price of $160,000 is set for 25 years and if it sells for more than that amount, the difference goes to the district. The standing committee on land use will refine the criteria for who quali-fies to purchase afford-able housing.

Council scheduled a public hearing for February 13, 2012 to receive comments from the public on the release of a restrictive covenant on the Sooke Harbour House which limits the number of outdoor events that can occur on the prop-erty to 15 times a year.

Land Use and Envi-ronment Committees

An in-camera resolu-tion on January 19, 2012

saw three members of the public appointed to the Finance and Admin-istration Committee. The two members are Lorne Christensen and Monica Scheiahu along with David Maitland as alternate public mem-ber at large. The council members on the com-mittee are Councillors Rick Kasper, Bev Berger and Kerrie Reay.

Appointed to the Land Use and Environment Committee are Andrew Haden and Geoff Steele with Adrian Cownden as alternate public member at large. Coun-cillors Herb Haldane, Maja Tait and Kevin Pearson sit as council representatives. Mayor Milne thanked all of those people who put their names forward.

Other committees will be reviewed to see where they could pos-sibly be combined or restructured.

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS • 3

Up Sooke

Thumbs Up!

COUNCIL BRIEFS

Pirjo Raits photos

Haggis riteThe immortal poet Robbie Burns was celebrated on Jan. 29 at the Legion. Left, Bill Dryden toasts the haggis along with the Sooke Pipes and Drums and speaks of the glorious properties (right) of the oaten orb.

GRAND RE-OPENING

AND NAME CHANGE

THE PUBLIC IS invited to attend the name change ceremony at the previously named Winks convenience store on Sooke River Road.

THE PUBLIC GOT an opportunity to help select the name.

THE FORMALITIES

BEGIN at 10 a.m. today, Feb. 1.

GET TESTEDSCREENING

MAMMOGRAPHY

FEB. 21-24 AT the Sooke Health Unit, 2145 Townsend Road (CASA) for an appointment call toll-free to: 1-800-663-9203.

DID YOU KNOW?

ARE YOU AWARE that you can see and read the entire Sooke News Mirror print edition online? Go to the website at: www.sookenewsmirror.com and scroll to the bottom and on the right you will see the e-edition, click on Latest Edition.

TO THOSE WEST Shore RCMP officers and the local citizen who helped save a man from potentially drowning after his car went into a creek.

HELPING PEOPLE LIVE BETTER LIVES

Cedar Grove Centre 250-642-2226

N E E D TO G E T A S H A R P E RC O N T RO L O N YO U R

B L O O D S U G A RIf you have an older blood sugar machine or would

like to upgrade to a newer model, come in and talk to me... I will gladly set you up and train you with a kit you will be comfortable with. Also if you get your diabetic supplies such as test strips, needles, and lancing devices with us, remember to ask for your free sharps disposal container... we provide the containers at no cost to you.Debbie Sullivan

Pharmacy Technician

“Living Sooke....Loving SookeSelling Sooke”

250.642.6361www.sookelistings.com

Did You Know?

Everyone is calling and asking about the “House” in Erinan Estates.

I will be at the house this Sunday 2-4 if anyone would like to view… it is a great example of the “Developers Vision”.

Buying or selling….call me!

MARLENEARDEN

2406 CAFFERY PLACEOpen House Sun 12-2

$399,900 (HST Included)

5 bdrm 3 bath home Built to allow legal suite if need-ed. Quiet cul de sac close to schools, recreation and Sooke Center. Nice moun-tain vista views. Ready for occupancy.

CLEARBROOK ESTATES6800 Grant Road

Open House Sat 12-2$279,900 to $299,900 (HST included)

3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 9 ft ceilings on main. Solid surface countertops, fenced backyard. Minutes to Sooke Center. 2 parking spots each. Ready for occupancy. We need these sold!

NEW CONSTRUCTIONNEW CONSTRUCTION

Page 4: Sooke News M irror

4 • www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

SEE COMPLETE L IST OF SPECIALS ONLINE AT WWW.VILLAGEFOODMARKETS.COM

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Superbowl 46

KICK OFF This SundayNew York Giants VS New England Patriots

Superbowl 46W e e k l y S p e c i a l s i n E f f e c t , P r i c e s A d v e r t i s e d a r e C a r d h o l d e r P r i c e s W e d n e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 , 2 0 1 2 - Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 7 , 2 0 1 2

O p e n 7 : 3 0 a m - 1 0 : 0 0 p m , 7 d a y s a w e e k i n c l u d i n g h o l i d a y s # 1 0 3 - 6 6 6 1 S o o k e R o a d • L o c a l l y O w n e d • L o c a l l y O p e r a t e d •

B.C. Transit Bus Passes, Lottery Centre, Gift Certificates and Canada Postage Stamps • We reserve the right to limit quantities • Proud member of Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce

Naturally Smoked

Maple Ham....................................

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Valley Farms

FrenchFries1kg..........

2/$300

Dairyland

CottageCheese500g...............

$249

So Nice

SoyaBeverage1.89L............

2/$700

Made in Store

MultigrainBread 454g...........

$239

Mexican

Asparagus $3.70kg....

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Coca-Cola12 Pack.........

2/$800

Bick’s Premium Pickles1L...................

$299

Kellogg’s

Mini WheatsCereal850g................

$499

Realemon

Lemon Juice 945ml...............

$199

White Swan

Paper Towels2 Roll................99¢

Unico Canned

Tomatoes796ml.............

3/$400

Tribal Java Premium

Coffee

454g.................$899

Saffl o

Sunfl owerOil 1L........

$399

Kraft

B.B.Q.Sauce455ml...........

2/$400

Dole 100%

Juice1L................

2/$300

Kraft

Salad Dressings475ml...............

$279

Unico Marinated

Artichokes 170ml.................99¢

V-H Rib or Dipping

Sauce341-455ml......

2/$500

Hershey Semi Sweet

ChocolateChips300g.............

2/$500

Fancy Feast Canned

Cat Food85g...............

3/$200

Montreal

Beef.............................................$169

Pizza Salami or

Pepperoni...............................$109

McCain International

Pizzas 482g...........2/$1000

Swanson

Meat Pies 200g.........99¢

Dairyland Organic

Milk 2L......................... $449

Philadelphia

Dips 227g....................2/$500

Mara Natha Natural

Almond Butter 737g.. $599

Pacifi c Foods Organic

Broths 1L.................. 2/$500

Old South

Juice Blends 330ml 2/$300

McCain Deep & Delicious

Cakes 510-538g............. $399

Eating Right

Margarine 907g.......... $299

Kraft Shredded

Cheese 380g.................$599

Enviro Kids Crispy

Rice Bars 168g.......... $299

Town Square Gluten Free

Crackers 100g....... 2/$300

Chocolate Chip

Muffi ns 6 Pack...................................$449

Cinnamon

Scones 6 Pack.................................. $349

Honey Garlic or Reg.

Pepperoni Sticks ........$139

7 Layer

Dip...................................................$119

Deli Made

Pizza..............................................$899

Cinnamon

Buns 6 pk..........................................$349

Crumpets 6 Pack............................$229

California

Strawberries 454g........

2/$500

Mexican X-large

Green Peppers $1.94/kg 88¢

Mexican Hass

Avocadoes...............98¢

Organic baby Peeled

Carrots 1lb bag............... 2/$300

Premium Large Chilean Seedless

Red FlameGrapes$3.70/kg........

$168

Mexican XXLarge Beef Steak

Tomatoes $1.94/kg..........88¢

Mexican Green

Onions................... 2/$98¢

River Ranch

Garden Salad 454g 2/$300

Previously Frozen

Black Tiger Prawns................

$165

Organic

Almonds $249

Natural Filberts

Hazel Nuts $279

Frozen Wild Pink

Salmon Fillets 99¢

Golden Dipt Hot or Original

Cocktail Sauce 237ml $229

Dried White Apple

Rings......$135

Bulk Goji

Berries...$199

Milk Chocolate Covered

Banana Chips $119

Raisin Almond Cluster

Granola 59¢

All Varieties

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/100g/100g

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/100g/100g /100g/100g

/100g/100g/100g/100g

3 Varieties

Value Pack

Fresh

Fresh

Fresh

eaeaeaea

ea

ChickenDrumettes $7.69/kg.........

$349

Glenwood Frozen Lean

Burger Patties 5 lb Package$1199

Grimm’s Pillow Pack European Wieners or

Smokies 375-450g........$499

Grimm’s

Garlic Sausage 300g $369

Extra Lean

Ground Beef$6.59/kg..........

$299

Canadian Pork

Back Ribs $8.80/kg....$399

Grimm’s Bavarian, Beef or Cheese Sizzlin

Smokies 450g.............. $499

Grimm’s

Pepperoni Sticks 450g $549

Alberta Beef AA or Better Striploin

Grilling Steak $15.41/kg

$699

/lb ea

ea

ea

/lb

/lb

ea

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/lb

/100g

/100g Two Varieties

Page 5: Sooke News M irror

Bringing farming back to kids

Christine VopelSooke News Mirror

The squawking of chickens and the bleat-

ing of sheep wake Deb-bie Cooper each morn-ing and she would not trade this for the world. The self-proclaimed animal lover and man-ager of 4-H enjoys rais-ing sheep, chickens and a horse on her hobby farm and, in turn, shar-ing that knowledge with children of all ages.

“It’s bringing farming back to the kids. I don’t want farming and rais-ing kids to be a thing of the past,” she said.

Cooper grew up in Esquimalt, located far from the sounds of live-stock and the colour-ful culture of farmland. Years later she and her husband settled in Metchosin finding it an ideal place to raise children. They wanted their kids to experience childhood in the coun-try with all the joys of playing in the creek and gathering eggs from the chickens.

The husband and wife team currently operate a hobby farm with 50 chickens, three sheep: Tulip, Rose and Diego, a miniature horse: Little Joe, honey bees, and several blue-berry plants.

In 2011 Cooper opened up the first ever Metchosin/Sooke/West Shore chapter of 4- H.

“My eight-year-old daughter, Julia, got me into it. I was a city girl.

I thought you had to have your own animals to join but you don’t. I began looking at start-ing my own club in Metchosin.”

From there things moved quickly. The first hurdle included a panel interview, refer-ence checks, a criminal record check. Soon the 4-H club was up and running with a total of 15 kids.

It’s never easy to run a hobby farm, be a full time mother and run a 4-H club all on your own but as Cooper said, “it’s so important to me that I just make it work. I am totally hyped about 4-H and I am so proud to be a part of such a won-derful organization.”

The first year proved to be a real ‘learning experience’ with the second year running a lot smoother. “It’s get-ting easier. 2012 has just begun and already 17 kids have signed

up,” said Cooper. In Clover Buds; an

entry-level 4-H pro-gram, kids are taught about honey bees, sheep, poultry, horti-culture and outdoor living. When the kids enter high school some of their 4-H projects can be used as credits in high school. There are also bursaries and scholarships available to the kids, explains Cooper.

During the first meet-ing, kids play a game known as an Icebreaker. They sit in a circle, shake each other’s hands and introduce them-selves to their neigh-bour. They have to find three things they have in common with each other before switching to the next person. “We want to boost confi-dence, self esteem and public speaking skills,” she said.

4-H now welcomes older kids. “Any kid

between the ages of 9 and 20 is welcome,” she said.

Local farmers have granted 4-H permis-sion to visit Perry Bay Farm and learn about their sheep. “Many retired farmers have called and wanted to help. It’s a great year so far. The interest has been incredible,” Coo-per said.

One of Cooper’s goals is to give the children skills that will help them throughout their lives. She wants to see them leave 4-H with knowledge and

confidence. “In the future I hope

to see kids raising their own animals and show-ing them at the local fairs. “

The program runs from January to Octo-ber and costs $140 a year. For more informa-tion on 4-H you can call Debbie Cooper at 250-478-4677.

She leaves with a quote.

“We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.”

Franklin D. Roosevelt

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com COMMUNITY • 5

4-H welcomes kids from all over

Submitted photo

Debbie Cooper talks to a group of 4-H kids at her hobby farm in Metchosin.

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Page 6: Sooke News M irror

6 • COMMUNITY www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

OAPO speaks out for seniorsPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

Eighty years ago Gandhi was arrested, Aldous Huxley pub-lished A Brave New World, the Lindburgh baby was kidnapped and it was the demise of the Dominion of Newfoundland. In 1932, the non-partisan, non-sectarian B.C. Old Age Pensioners Org. was born. It was the middle of the Great Depression and battles were being waged by the Old Age Pensionsers Organiza-tion against all levels of government opposing unjust action of the pen-sion board. The OAPO offered to take up “all causes of members who have been unjustly treated.” This is still the purpose today.

“A lot of people don’t know who we are and what we do,” says Shir-ley Lowe, Regional Director South Island O.A.P.O. “Since it is the anniversary we want to let people know what we stand for.”

The OAPO is an advo-cate for seniors. The local Branch #88 has much to be proud of in their 48 years. They purchased the property on which Ayre Manor Lodge now stands and set up the first Seniors’ Drop-In Centre. Branch

#88 has also crafted resolutions on seniors’ issues for presentation to the provincial and federal governments.

“We get ideas from each community on issues and present them to the federal gov-ernment, and we keep abreast with what’s going on with seniors,” said Lowe.

The branch survives on membership fees, which are $12/year, with $6 going towards the B.C. OAPO board to finance yearly conven-tions, board meetings and other expenses. There is also a scholar-ship fund for students majoring in geriatric care.

Their meetings are held at the Seniors’

Drop-In Centre now located in the fire-fighters lounge at the municipal hall. The drop-in centre pro-vides a social atmo-sphere with lunches, bingo, cards and Scrab-ble. It’s a place where seniors can go to meet with others, go on the seniors’ bus on outings and shopping trips.

The Sooke Elderly Community Housing Society monitors and oversees Ayre Manor Assisted Living and Complex Care.

What the seniors would like though is a place to call their own. They appreciate the space they use at the municipal hall, but like many groups a single-use building geared for

seniors would be ideal.“There are many vol-

unteers who keep these organizations available to provide the services for our senior popula-tion. All require more members and more volunteers. New com-ers and new members are invited to join the local branch.

“The social aspect of getting together, offer-ing our experience, knowledge and wisdom will better our commu-nity and other commu-nities,” said Lowe.

Branch #88 will be holding their next meeting on Wednesday, Feb.1 at 1 p.m. upstairs in the firefighters lounge on Otter Point Road. Lunch is served at noon.

Bring some ideas and join us to continue the tradition of speaking for seniors.

“Old age is not conta-gious,” said Lowe.

Pirjo Raits photo

Seniors gather in the firefighters lounge to play bingo and to socialize.

SOOKE BAPTIST CHURCH7110 West Coast Road | 250-642-3424

SUNDAY SERVICE

10:00 am Children, youth & adult ministriesPastor Dwight Geiger

Email [email protected]

ST. ROSE OF LIMA Roman Catholic Parish

6221 Sooke Rd. | 250-642-3945 | Fax: 778-425-3945Saturday Mass 5pm | Sunday Mass, 10 am

Thursday Mass 10:30 amChildren’s Religious Ed: Sat. 3:45pm

Offi ce Hours: Tue-Wed 10-2, Thurs 2pm-4pm Rev. Fr. Michael Favero

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH2110 Church Rd | 250-642-4124

SUNDAY SERVICE

10:15 am Pre-Service Singing10:30 am Family worship

Rev. Dr Gordon KouwenbergParents Room and well equipped Nursery

HOLY TRINITY Anglican Church

1962 Murray Road | 250-642-3172HOLY COMMUNION SERVICES

Sunday & Wednesday 10amSaturday 5pm

Revs Dr. Alex and Nancy Nagywww.holytrinitysookebc.org

CHRISTIAN LIFE ASSEMBLYSOOKE HARBOUR

6851 West Coast RoadPastor Eduardo Aristizabal

SUNDAY SERVICE 10:00am250.642.4822

Lend a Hand

A SCHOOL TEACHER asked her rst graders to draw a picture of something they were thankful for. She thought of how

little these children from poor neighborhoods actually had to be thankful for. She reasoned that most of them would no doubt draw pictures of turkeys on tables with lots of other food.

She was surprised with the picture that Douglas handed in. It was the picture of a human hand, poorly drawn. But whose hand? The other children tried to guess. One said it was the hand of God because He brings the food to us. Another said it was the hand of a farmer because he raises and grows the food.

Finally, when the others were back at their work, the teacher bent over Douglas’ desk and asked whose hand it was. "Why, it’s your hand, teacher," he mumbled. Then she recalled that frequently at recess she had taken Douglas, a scrubby, forlorn child, by the

hand. She did it with many of the children and never thought much about it. But Douglas did. You see, she refreshed his spirit and he never forgot it.

“A generous person will prosper;

whoever refreshes others will be refreshed.“

Proverbs 11:25 TNIV

The he Pastor's astor's PenenTThe he PPastor's astor's PPenen

Pastor Dwight Geiger

Check out the Goldstream News Gazette and the Sooke News Mirror each Wednesday for our weekly fl ier.

Clearance prices up to 70% off on selected merchandise throughout the store

to make way for exciting new products.

Proud sponsors of the local SPCA and Victoria’s Transition House.

Pet friendly store too!

We’re openDuring our store improvements

50% more retail space!Come see what’s new!

LANGFORDWest Shore Town Centre

Page 7: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS • 7

LOOKING BACKA look through the

Sooke News Mirror archives:

Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010

Sooke to promote region during the Olympic games

If one were to take all the visual images of the Sooke region and com-press them into a 20X40 space, chances are it would look just like the BC street display. Volunteers are busy preparing the Sooke to Port Renfrew dis-play to be showcased at O zone in Richmond for the duration of the Olympic games.

The entire back drop of the display is over 52’ long and will have a huge picture of Sooke Harbour emblazoned on it. The fire depart-ment has built a replica of the harbour board-walk, while others built a small version of the Sheringham Light-house. The display will have water, rocks, trees and ceramic starfish. A fibreglass Orca will leap out of the water and the actual $100,000 winning salmon taken at the Salmon Classic Fishing Derby will be on hand for visitors to take their photos with it. It is hoped that the T’Sou-Ke Nation will be able to contribute an aspect of their culture

to the display.

Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2008

Care givers looking for solution

Uncertainty contin-ues to dog resident’s (and their families) of Eagle’s Bluff Lodge — a senior citizen’s facil-ity on McMillan Road in Sooke.

In the past couple of weeks it has been announced that the lodge would close and residents would need to vacate by as soon as February 29.

Staff had apparently voted to unionize, a decision not favourable with Ming Yang, owner of the lodge. Attempts to reach Yang for com-ment, incidentally were unsuccessful.

Subsequent informa-tion revealed 12 months notice was required (even though the lodge is a privately run opera-tion) under Vancouver Island Health Authority licensing regulations.

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2006

Sooke teen rocks Victoria idol

Edward Milne Com-munity School’s Car-men Nelson missed out on the prizes at the Vic-toria Idol finals on Sat-urday, but her great big cheering section still

rocked the house. Nelson’s rendition of

“When You’re Good to Mama” was a big crowd pleaser.

The 17-year-old has made a name for her-self at the series of Idol elimination rounds by bringing an enthusi-astic cheering section from Sooke with her.

Thirteen-year-old Parksville singer Alex-andria Maillot was named Victoria Idol. People packed the Vic-toria’s Conservatory of Music’s Alix Golden Hall to hear the 10 Idol finalists perform their songs before a panel of five judges.

Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2001

Why aren’t more bums in seats?

Sooke Community Theatre is having its worst year ever. Why aren’t more people coming out to see the top notch shows?

Despite a lively and entertaining perfor-mance by dance the-atre group Motus O last weekend, only about 100 people filled the 350-seat Sooke Com-munity Theatre, many of whom were students with complimentary tickets.

The low attendance is nothing new — this season has been the worst year ever in

terms of the theatre’s attendance, said com-munity school co-ordi-nator Lori Messer.

Sooke is now on the edge of potentially losing future perfor-mances, according to Messer.

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 1984

Salmon fishery fac-ing “Crisis”

Serious impact on sports fishery here

The salmon sports fishery is facing a crisis that, unless resolved satisfactorily, could have a serious effect on the economy of Sooke and other sports fish-ing communities in the province, says Marc van Hasselt, owner of Sooke Harbour Marina.

He said the federal government is propos-ing regulations that would cut the sports fishing limit and impose winter and summer sport fishing closures that could virtually strangle the salmon sports fishing in the province.

Those present at the meeting expressed great fears that federal moves to limit sport fishing as a conserva-tion measure would have a serious eco-nomic impact on the province.

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Page 8: Sooke News M irror

8 • EDITORIAL www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

EDITORIALRod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorChristine Vopel Reporter

The Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 112--6660 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

It appears as though a few peo-ple have taken exception to my suggestion that we abandon talk

of legalizing marijuana and dedicate ourselves to the development of our community’s kids so that they can go on and fulfill their potential. It’s a shame that a such a small mino-rity (albeit very vocal minority) of our population are pouring so much energy into pushing for the legaliza-tion of this harmful substance.

We know that the overwhelming majority of people in Sooke do not use marijuana. We know that most families don’t sit around the dinner table chasing their pork roast with a joint. We know that they don’t pass a bong around Ayre Manor, nor do they encourage kids to smoke marijuana at any of our great lear-ning institutions in Sooke. This is a community that has invested in protecting the future of our youth by encouraging them to make smart, healthy choices, and we are better as a result.

Yes, there is a small percentage of the population who have been diagnosed with such terrible debili-tating ailments that physicians have seen fit to prescribe marijuana to help battle pain or stimulate appe-tite. My heart bleeds for these folks, that their quality of life has deteriora-ted to the point where the use of this substance is necessary, but when I’ve had discussions with some of them, even they have said that they do not wish for marijuana to be legal

for any other non-medicinal reason. Everyone is entitled to their own

opinion, but everyone is not entit-led to their own facts. Marijuana has been proven to have over 400 che-micals, negatively effect the immune system, the respiratory system, and impair judgement and coordina-tion (http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/evidence99/marijuana/Health_1.html). Studies are now linking mari-juana use to a variety of mental dis-orders including acute toxic psycho-sis, delusions, panic attacks, deper-sonalization and paranoia... which may help to explain the accusation that marijuana prohibition is a giant police-led government conspiracy to keep us employed. Anybody who has ever had intimate knowledge of what a front line police officer does would never say such a thing.

I would love to subscribe to the notion that organized crime could be eliminated simply by legalizing marijuana, but the truth is that it wouldn’t matter. A great deal of the trafficking done by the organized crime element takes place with inter-national partners, and would conti-nue to thrive regardless of the legal status of marijuana here at home. And they don’t stop with mariju-ana. Ecstasy, cocaine, heroin, meth, and whatever drug is waiting to be invented in the future. They would get it to our kids without blinking a self conscious eye, unless our kids were supported in making smart decisions. The answer is not found

in legalizing everything. I visited the “LEAP” (Law Enforce-

ment Against Prohibition) website, and one of the first things that you read is that they believe that ALL drugs should be legalized. “Educa-tors for Sensible Drug Policy” feel the same way. I understand that this is a tiny group of law enforcement officials and educators who feel bea-ten down by the horrors they’ve seen as a result of drug use. I have felt that way at times myself. After 26 years of policing, my head is full of horrific memories relating to drug abuse (marijuana included) that could have been avoided with smart decision making. But the answer is not to give up. If we all devoted our energy to helping our kids make healthy choices, then our world would be a better place.

We’re fortunate here in Sooke, because so many are already wor-king on this, and I give my heartfelt thanks to the countless men, women and families who continue to do this. I would also like to thank the many who have e-mailed me with their support ([email protected]) and I welcome contact from anyone who would like to discuss other opportunities to help our kids thrive.

Cpl. Scott HilderleyRCMP Drugs and Organized

Crime Awareness Service

Legalization of marijuana not the answer

The sky is falling...

OUR VIEW

Some may think it is a signal that it is the beginning of the end, others have more sinister thoughts about the mysterious rumblings going on in and around Sooke.

The more unplausible explanations are that it has something to do with the end of time, as in the end of the Mayan calendar as someone prophesied. It is set to be 12, 21, 2012. Some sources predict a series of cataclysmic events such as solar flares, earthquakes and general disintegration of the Earth. Perhaps we are too

cynical here but we predict this is total bunk.

Other whispered explanations include aliens and UFOs. While it is not too far out to consider other life forms in the universe, this explanation is also listed in the ridiculous column.

So what else? Earthquakes have been ruled out. Solar flares? Well, some folks are saying they haven’t been sleeping well ever since the announcement of solar flare activity. Maybe people aren’t sleeping because they are worried about the end of the world?

The most likely explanation is either some sort of nefarious military or air traffic activity high in the atmosphere. If the U.S. military is conducting some sort of testing on the Strait of Juan de Fuca they are not going to let us know about it.

Or it could be some sort of strange phenomenon in the atmosphere, energy of some sort being knocked about by thunder storms. Maybe it’s blasting sounds gone awry.

Whatever it is, it is causing a lot of amusing conversation and it has the doom sayers ducking for cover and the skeptics chuckling.

... it has the doom sayers ducking for cover...

How to reach us:

Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

Rod Sluggett [email protected]

Harla Eve [email protected]

Pirjo Raits [email protected]

Christine Vopel [email protected]

Rod Sluggett, Joan Gamache [email protected]

Joan Gamache [email protected]

Steve Arnett [email protected]

Frank Kaufman [email protected]

Harla Eve, [email protected] Sluggett

General:

Publisher:

Office Manager:

Reporter:

Advertising:

Circulation:

Production Manager:

Creative Services:

Classifieds:

Editor:

Agreement #40110541

2010 WINNER

OTHER VIEWS

ANOTHER VIEW

Page 9: Sooke News M irror

Clarifying volunteer centre

Thank you so much for the article on the Sooke Family Resource Society (SFRS) laun-dromat survey and the volunteer centre com-mittee progress (Jan. 18/12). This is just one paragraph which we feel needs clarification.

Sooke Region CHI partnered with CASA to obtain the grant for hire a coordinator. The umbrella concept is to provide support, training and network-ing opportunities for the over 160 non-profit organizations and societies in the Sooke region.

Additionally, it will support volunteers and assist making connec-tions between volun-teers and groups who need volunteers. How-ever, the VC will not be managing or coordinat-ing volunteers within each organization. That will still be the responsibility within each organization.

Marlene Barry & Jodie McDonald

Sooke Region Vol-unteer Centre Co-

Chairs

Speed killsI have not contrib-

uted to letters in the Sooke newspaper for quite some time but I feel moved to say something about the situation of the local wildlife population and the increasing amount of children in the areas of Townsend Road.

I live on Townsend Road and when I bought my house it was a dead-

end road. Then the last mayor and council released the Acreman properties for develop-ment and now we have a huge amount of hous-ing on that property.

The main issue was that Sooke mayor and council, at that time, allowed Townsend Road to be pushed through to meet up with Rhodi-nite which resulted in everyone who used to use Otter Point Road or Church Road now are using Townsend Road as a thoroughfare.

The speeds at which these drivers go are astonishing consider-ing that there is on Townsend Road CASA which took away half of the home of the resi-

dent deer and intro-duced a great number of parents coming and going (on foot) with small children. I agree CASA is important and have no problem with it but now the Catho-lic Church, which owns the property, is build-ing their new church on the other half of the property. Again, I have no problem with a church being built, but its development has again taken away the habitat of the deer population.

I guess my only recourse of argument is that there should be speed bumps on at least two spots on Townsend Road — to stop the speeding drivers as

well as sidewalks all the way up and down the road. These speeding drivers have already killed numerous house-hold pets, deer, squir-rels and I suppose noth-ing will be done until a child is killed.

Please write your local mayor, RCMP, MLA, etc. in an attempt to address this problem.

Right now I am watch-ing a fawn out my win-dow. A very small fawn eating some leftover birdseed in my yard. Her mother was killed by one of the thought-less Sooke speeders. Hope you speeders all get to your destinations in time.

Jeanne EvansSooke

Fishery could be lost

In an interview with CBC Radio, “On the Island,” the mayor of Ucluelet had every rea-son to be alarmed, and hopefully we will hear more concerned voices about this grave situa-tion.

Buying back fishing licences is definitely not about conservation of fish stock, but Depart-ment of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) policy. It led to the total destruc-tion of the traditional fishery, as we know it, on the East Coast in the 90’s and now they are doing the same here.

Why would DFO spend millions of dol-lars to lure small fish-ermen into handing back their licences for an attractive lump sum of money? It looks so harmless in the begin-ning, but the ultimate goal is to eliminate the hundreds of small fishermen in favour of big commercial fleets, which for DFO trans-lates into less adminis-tration costs.

The consequences are disastrous: big

Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail editor@sooke newsmirror.com.

Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

Letters

LETTERS

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LETTERS • 9

We asked: Do you think you are being gouged at the gas pump?

I drive a diesel, it’s a bit much but it goes a long

way. They can raise prices because everyone will pay

for it, everybody has to drive.

Drea Gibson

It is a lot of money.

Ben Caspersen

Why in Langford can I fill up for $1,15, yet out here

is is $1.22? It’s just not fair.

Astrid Koenig

It’s been pretty bad.

Taylor Morgan

Cont’d on page 11

Bringing in the haggis

Pirjo Raits photo

The venerable haggis was brought into the Robbie Burns dinner on Sunday, Jan. 29 with pomp and ceremony by Sooke Pipes and drummers; James McNab, right, Ted Leaker with the haggis, and Dave Green with a wee bit o’ scotch.

Feature Article

SELLING SOOKE SINCE 1985

Last year nearly a thousand homes were Listed on the MLS in Sooke. 258 have Sold or are Pending. 500 are no longer on the Market and 213 remain unsold. If you are thinking of Listing your home and wish to make certain it does sell for the best price, and in a timely fashion, call Michael today. See how his 25 years experience can help you obtain the results you and your family need.

Page 10: Sooke News M irror

Heather asked ~ “What is the best way to remove stamps from envelopes to get maxi-mum value for the stamps?”

Not sure how steam might work on the newer stamps but basically you remove the envelope from the stamp, not the other way around.

You’ll tear the stamp if you try to remove it from the envelope, but

by carefully peeling the envelope away from the stamp, you can get it off in good shape, but it takes patience.

“Capt Ralph” ~ Ralph Hull

The SPCA in Victoria collects used stamps. It’s best to leave at least 1/4” around the stamp.

I take stamps into them when I’m in town and would be happy to do so. If arrangements could be made to drop

them off at the Sooke News Mirror office I’d pick them up and take

them in. Marie Mills

We can never go back.

Life will never be as it was when most of us were grow-ing up here in North America because, despite what we were told by clever adver-tising, our lifestyle has always been unsustain-able as a way of being on the Earth. The pressing question is: do we use our energy to desperately hang on (and prop up) an out-dated way of life, or do we focus on creating a more sustainable, fair and harmonious one?

Here are some of the ideas that AFN movie-goers put forward for promoting change in our lives:

Stop accumulating stuff.

• Don’t buy anything that you can’t reuse.

• Buy locally pro-duced and grown prod-ucts and use local ser-vices

• Avoid buying cor-porate products and services. Buy Fair Trade products when you can. Examine attempts by corporations and busi-nesses to “greenwash” (make it sound like they are creating caring, sus-tainable and healthy products and working conditions when they may not be at all).

• Avoid buying things that come on styrofoam trays or are packaged in plastic. Ask busi-

nesses to give you the item unpackaged.

• Repair things instead of buying new, even if it costs the same. This keeps repair persons in a job and makes less landfill (plus, often older items are more sturdily made than new ones).

• Don’t use bottled water. Refill your own bottle and remember to take it with you.

• Buy used items rather than new ones whenever possible. And recycle your usable but no longer needed items.

• Learn how to grow and produce your own: food, personal care and cleaning products and vitamins (by juicing fresh vegetables and fruit).

• Avoid trying to change the way you look by artificial means. Accept your body.

• Establish local coop-erative enterprises in the agricultural, retail, grocery, health food, tourist, restaurant sec-tors and in producing value-added products and services to provide stable livelihoods and profit-sharing based on economic participa-tion and to build a more resilient, unified com-munity.

• Use the public library. We are fortu-nate to have such a wonderful service.

Work with the natu-

ral ecological cycles.• Find and implement

ways to change waste to energy.

• Use grey water for irrigation.

• Advocate for a com-posting depot in Sooke

• Support local farms and join and advocate for community gardens.

Connect to commu-nity.

• Trade goods and services and/or use a local currency more and participate in the money system less.

• Connect with com-munity websites, news-papers and bulletin boards to promote and find out what is hap-pening in your area (e.g. “Transition Cafes” on the first Sunday of every month at 3 p.m. at the Reading Room to discuss ideas for making Sooke a more sustainable, less fossil-fuel dependent community).

• Vote.• Write letters, give

input to decision-mak-ers, join committees, advocate for sustain-ability wherever you can.

• Approach town council about establish-ing bylaws that promote sustainable building (and demolition) prac-tices.

• Advocate for tax breaks and support for people who create or invest in alternate sources of power gen-eration.

• Explore ride sharing locally and for regular commuting.

• Bank with credit unions rather than large profit-making banks; invest in the real, local economy rather than in stock market, hedge funds etc.

Be conscious.• Educate children

for emotional intelli-gence (less screens/more participatory life; be involved in what is happening in your child’s school).

• Eat real, fresh, living food. Avoid processed, chemical-laden foods that fog up the brain, dampen the spirit and clog up the heart, all of which are needed in order to be present, res-ponsible and connec-ted with life.

• Avoid cell phones, mobile phones, and other wi-fi and slee-ping close to electro-nic appliances as these can interfere with your natural energy fields making you less able to focus and can also be harmful to your health.

• Commune with nature as often as you can (leave your machi-nes and technology at home).

• Slow down and pro-ceed with care (be min-dful); be grateful; listen; smile; be good to each other and remember that we are all in this together.

• Take responsibility;

speak out; be resilient; be strong.

• Listen to your inner knowing; try to work with anyone who sets him/herself up as an authority over you and help that person to ins-tead work with you and listen to you, or else remove yourself from the situation.

• Involve as many people in the commu-nity as possible in all of these initiatives - a few of us individually will make a little diffe-rence, all of us working together can change the world. We are the 99 per cent.

10 • LIFESTYLES www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Awareness film promotes ideas for change

Answers to last week’s How do I...?

We offer the following Prenatal Services:

Group Classes for the expectant mother and her partner that cover everything you need to know to prepare for labour, childbirth and your new baby. New classes starting February and May 2012.

Additional support services offering one-to-one appointments, free prenatal vitamins, food vouchers, and bus tickets. Ongoing registration.

This program is supported by United Way, Victoria Foundation and Success by Six

Member of BC Association

of Pregnancy Outreach Programs

Please call Sooke Family Resource Society

250-642-5152 Or visit 2145 Townsend Rd, Sooke

PREGNANT? LIVE IN THE SOOKE AREA?

Senior’s DayFirst Tuesday of Every Month

your purchasefor citizens 55 +

(upon presentation of an ID card.)

10%off

DIRECTPAYMENT

The AIR MILES® program, another great reason to shop at RONA!

Off er valid fi rst Tuesday of every month at Rona in Victoria Langford only. Off er valid upon presentation of an ID card. Applicable on single transaction purchases only. Only “cash and carry” purchases paid by cash, debit or major credit cards are eligible. Off er not applicable to the purchase of gift cards and may not be combined with a no fee, no interest fi nancing off er or any other off er. Not available for in-house accounts and clients with contractual agreements. Details in store. ®™Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by Loyalty Management Group Canada Inc. and RONA inc. *VISA Int./Fédération des caisses Desjardins du Québec (FCDQ) and RONA, authorized users.

Off er valid at this store only:

Langford850 Langford Parkway,Victoria, BC250 478-6680

Plus, earn3x the AIR MILES™reward miles with a purchase of $60 or more(before taxes)

RONA_J_SeniorsDay_4,33x7_Langford_Ad.indd 1 11-08-26 10:47 AM

FREE4" potted Rose

First 100 customers

THANK YOU SOOKEFOR VOTING FOR OUR NEW NAME

453 VOTES....AND THE WINNER IS....

WITH 57%

CHECK OUT OUR BRITISH CHOCOLATE RANGE

AND OUR NEW FRESH BURGER AND SOFT ICE CREAM MENU

GRAND OPENING SPECIALFEBRUARY 4 AND 5 ONLY

SOFT VANILLA ICE CREAM CONEFOR ONLY $1 (plus tax)

(50 cents of every purchase going toSooke Soccer Artifi cial Turf Fund)

www.sookeriverstoreandgrill.ca or 250-642-0733

Take-Out Restaurante

250-642-0733

S.T.E. RENTALSSooke Tools & Equipment Rentals6228 Sooke Rd @ Butler Bros Complex

250-642-0337

NEED IT?RENT IT!From From BOBCATSBOBCATS to to CARPET CLEANERSCARPET CLEANERS

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKDELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

U Haul Trucks, Moving Supplies, & boxes.U Haul Trucks, Moving Supplies, & boxes.

....and everything in Between!....and everything in Between!

Songs by Jean-Baptist Lully,

harpsichord solos & instrumental works

NANCY WASHEIM, soprano, MARY BROWN,

harpsichord, SUE INNES, violin

WARREN MOORE & CUYLER PAGE, recorders

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 7:30 p.m.

HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH

1962 MURRAY RD, SOOKE

ADMISSION: $7.00

Call 250-646-2532 for info.

HARPSICHORD IN

FRENCH STYLE

PLAIN DELIGHT: MUSIC WITH THE

Page 11: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LETTERS • 11

trawlers with their destructive trawling equipment scraping the sea floor and haul-ing every living sea creature in with their huge nets, is akin to clear cutting in the for-est. It destroys the food supply chain of marine life and the ecosystem as a whole.

Furthermore, by tak-ing the livelihood away from families, the young ones leave to find jobs in other places, where the money is, and within a short period of time whole villages are abandoned. We had first hand experience of this happening in New-foundland and Labra-dor.

I would urge every-one interested in pre-serving our precious West Coast fish stocks together with a con-servation-conscious traditional fishery, its spectacular marine life and resulting tourism, to take a public stand opposing DFO policies before it is too late.

Gisela KumarSooke

DFO and the dam

I thought Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) was here to pro-tect salmon and habi-tat. With the removal of the Bill James Dam on DeMamiel Creek it will destroy and remove vital salmon and trout habitat. Coho adults in the fall like to travel to the upmost reaches of the creeks they inhabit. This will void fish life and kill fry in the sum-mer months, which will reduce the salmon pop-ulation on DeMamiel Creek.

In 1998-2000, the Sooke Salmon Enhance-ment Society, Pacific Salmon Foundation, volunteers and DFO spent over $250,000 on rebuilding this dam and making it structur-ally sound. The dam stores water in the win-ter and this enables a release of water in the dry, summer months. It is controlled by a release valve operated by volunteers. With this flow in the summer months, salmon fry

are able to survive the dry months. Coho live in the creek for over a year prior to going out into the ocean. It is important that the creek does not dry up in the summer in the upper reaches where these fry are living.

If this dam is removed, what a waste of money and destruc-tion of a valuable fish habitat and it makes me feel like not donat-ing money to salmon enhancement projects where and when DFO is involved. I feel the com-munity-based groups know more about the watersheds in their area than DFO with their budget and liabil-ity cutting mentality.

This dam is operated by the SSES volunteers and there is no cost to DFO to operate and maintain it.

Please write to stop this ludicrous idea of DFO.

Rather than send-ing it in the mail, let-ters addressed to the Regional Water Man-ager may be e-mailed to [email protected]. They should be cc’d to Richard Powley

(dfo) [email protected]

Glen Varney Sooke

This has got to be a joke

Please tell me that the letter from Amanda Mariner in the Jan. 25 issue was a joke.

Anyone who states that a ‘green car wash’ is a car wash using ‘organically certified pure spring water’ must be joking.

For the record, a ‘green car wash’ is one that removes all con-taminants from the water used in washing the car before send-ing it down a drain or sewer. While I am not an expert in how Cali-fornians wash their cars, using ‘organically certified pure spring water’, i.e. pure drink-ing water, is just plain wasteful. Using sea water as the writer sug-gests would probably result in rusty cars.

P.L. VoganSooke

Cont’d from page 9

LETTERS 2012 Visitors Guide2012 Visitors Guide

Sooke to Port RenfrewSooke to Port RenfrewON SALE NOW!ON SALE NOW!

Ad Deadline February 17, 2012Ad Deadline February 17, 2012Publication Date April 2012Publication Date April 2012

Printedon 70lb

Glossy Paper

Contact Joan or Rodat 250-642-5752

[email protected]@sookenewsmirror.com

published bypublished by

‘Your community at your doorstep‘Your community at your doorstep’

Design &Construction

of Healthy Homes from All Natural

Materials

Keary Conwright250-642-0535

www.kcnaturalhomes.comwww.kcnaturalhomes.com

K C Natural Homes

EVERGREEN CENTREEVERGREEN CENTRE

250-642-5229250-642-5229OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Except Holidays

Here’s my Card!Separate these business cards and keepthem on fi le for reference.

To haveyour cardsdistributedcontact:

112-6660 Sooke Road

Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 250 642-5752

[email protected]

Page 12: Sooke News M irror

12 •ARTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Peace Out: Filmmakers to attend viewingIn the Peace River

Region of B.C. an energy bonanza of unimaginable size is unfolding — far from the eyes of the world. The mega-projects include a major new dam, tens of thousands of hydro-fracked shale gas wells, a nuclear power plant and more tar sands.

On Wednesday, Feb. 8, Awareness Film Night will present the film Peace Out, an exploration of these plans to industrialize this ecologically significant and vital part of our province and our world. Voted the Most Popular Canadian Documentary at the 2011 Vancouver International Film Festival in November, this is a beautifully made, visually dynamic film with

a great score and evoca-tive unexpected images of the planet’s energy econ-omy. Peace Out is a gen-erously inquisitive film, made with an open mind and a fierce sense of com-mitment. It’s these two qualities that combine to make its conclusion so powerfully convinc-ing. Energy costs. Let’s

talk about how much.The film will be attended

by one of the filmmakers, Fabio Wilkinson, and Ben Parfitt, an award-winning investigative journalist and analyst for the Cana-dian Centre For Policy Alternatives who has spent the past two years researching and writing about energy develop-

ments in the Peace and by local MLA John Horgan.

Wilkinson and Parfitt will be able to answer ques-tions from moviegoers and update us on issues cov-ered in the film. Parfitt will speak on the explosion of natural gas developments in the Peace and its impact on the environment.

The film night will begin at 7 p.m. and go until 9:30.

Admission is by dona-tion and all proceeds will go to the Peace Valley Envi-ronment Association. This film will not be available to rent from the Awareness Film Night library at Video To Go after the screening, so come out and see it on the big screen, chat with the speakers and support this special evening.

Pirjo Raits photo

Literacy Week

Sooke News Mirror publisher Rod

Sluggett went back to school on Jan. 26. He read to the Grade 4-5 students in Mme. Ridewood’s class at

Ecole Poirier.

Canadian images

Q: What do I do when my mortgage is renewing?

A: When you receive your mortgage renewal in the

mail, don’t just sign the form and send it back to the

lender. Over 70% of mortgage holders do just that, and

the usual result is a higher mortgage rate and a product

that might not be best suited to your needs. It is best to

consult with a mortgage broker who can make sure that

you are getting the best rate and product to suit your

needs and, as always, there is no fee for the service.

If your mortgage is renewing soon, call us for a free

consultation.

Q. My child can read, but I wory about her math skills. How

can I help her.

A. While it’s natural for children to prefer certain subjects,

numeracy and math are essential skills for life. Often, the math

children learn in school feels disconnected from the math they

need in “real life.” When your daughter buys things, makes

change, bakes cookies, or attempts a simple sewing project, she’s

engaging in math. Ask for her help with tasks like measuring

for new fl ooring, hanging photos or fi guring out the tip at a

restaurant. And don’t forget MATH MANIA, a fun evening of

math games for kids, happening in Sooke at EMCS, January

19th from 6:30pm to 8:00pm.

Jodie McDonald 250-580-2252

Literacy Outreach CoordinatorSooke Region, Vancouver Island

[email protected]

Questions and Answers from Sooke

P R O F E S S I O N A L SQ. Do you carry insurance and are you bonded?

A. Not too often do we get asked this question. This is us…..In-

sured, Bonded, Work Safe BC ‘in good standing’, Accredited Busi-

ness with the Better Business Bureau, members of the Sooke Region

Chamber of Commerce, Certifi ed Plumbers, Gas Fitting, Hydronic

Heating, In Floor Heating, Fireplace/Boiler/Furnace Sales and Ser-

vice, InterMunicipal Business License, and over 39 years in the in-

dustry, 12 in Sooke. You should ask this honest question of everyone

who intends to works for you. Protect yourself, ask questions!

Lost? Look for the Northern Star for direction.

We specialize in ‘Peace of Mind’

CAR CARE “MUSTS” YOU DON’T WANT TO SKIP (BRAKE FLUID)

WHY: The fl uid in your car’s brake hydraulic system transfers your foot pressure at the brake pedal into stopping power at the wheels. An adequate supply of clean brake fl uid is absolutely essential for safe vehicle operation. Old, moisture-contaminated brake fl uid, or a low fl uid level that allows air to enter the system, can lead to brake fade or a complete loss of braking power.

WHEN: Inspect the brake fl uid level at every oil change. If the level has fallen below the “low” mark on the fl uid reservoir, it usually indicates major brake wear or a leak somewhere in the system; have the brakes inspected as soon as possible. Most vehicle manufacturers recommend that the brake fl uid be replaced periodically to fl ush moisture and contaminants from the system. Every two years is a common interval; check your vehicle owner’s manual for specifi c recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE: Old brake fl uid or fl uid at low levels can result in your brakes fading or completely failing. Plus, a leak in the brake line can cause a vehicle fi re if the fl uid drips onto a heated surface such as a catalytic converter.

250-642-4499

Presented by the Kidneyfoundation of Canada

Tickets available athttp://auditorium.uvic.ca

Susan Jacks& Friends

in concert

Saturday,March 10, 2012

7 p.m.

University of Victoria

FarquharAuditorium

Page 13: Sooke News M irror

Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

When she answers thephone, it

seems like a huge effort and one gets the sense that Bobbie-Jo Peterson is pulling herself up out of a deep sleep tryingto grapple with what is being asked of her.

“It’s been rough,” is the only way Bobbie-JoPeterson can describe how she feels about herillness. Peterson suffers from sarcoidosis, anauto immune disease, where an abnormalcollection of chronic inflammatory cellsform nodules in mul-tiple organs. It’s a sys-temic disease with no cure and no real known cause.

“I’ve been dealing with bad health issues for 20-30 years,” saidPeterson. “It’s been hard to pin point... I was diagnosed with this four years ago.”

As if ill health isn’t bad enough, Peter-son has also been set back financially. Her subsidized rent went from $194 to $475 with only two weeks notice because of some sort of administrative deci-sion.

“My rent went from affordable to not afford-able,” said Peterson who lives on a very small CPP disability cheque. “There’s noth-ing I can do about it. It has set me way back and the stress doesn’t help (her health).”

Peterson said she is “literally scraping by,” doing whatever she has to do to keep going. She is allowed to supplement her disabil-ity cheque but because of her disease she can’t do a thing right now.

“I have good days and bad days but this has put me in a tail spin,” said Peterson.

Peterson has been a strong force with the Sooke Harbour Play-ers, as a president, producer, director and back stage working with make up and cos-tumes. She is also the marketing coordinator for her son’s football team. Most recently she has been volun-teering and teaching Belmont students in the cosmetology class a little bit about stage make up in the theatre

group’s Youth Mentor-ing Program. She gives generously of her timeeven though it is not easy with a disease thatflares up unexpectedly.

“It’s great,” she said

of the mentoring, “I willbe going back... I love it.”

Now the arts commu-nity is rallying behindher and some of her friends have organized

a benefit on Saturday, Feb. 4.

Dave Gallant, whohas known Bobbie-Jo for some time, coordi-nates the monthly con-cert series for the folk

society, and decidedthat he wanted to help by organizing a benefit.

“I’ve lived in Sooke for 30 years, almost half mylife. We have a strong and caring community

here, that steps up tothe plate when friends are in need. I wouldn’twant to live anywhere else. When I learnedabout Bobbie-Jo’s situ-ation, I knew I had to dosomething and putting on this benefit concert is something I know how to do. I purposelycalled on Sooke-based artists to be a part of this, because I wanted to keep it “community.” I know our community will come out and sup-port Bobbie-Jo in her time of need.”

Gallant called Gord Phillips, whose bluesinfused folk rock style is a big hit with islandaudiences. Once Phil-lips heard the story

he was immediatelyinspired to help out.

Thom Southwood,known in town for writing the local hitHowl The Musical, has worked with Bobbie-Joon theatre projects for Sooke Harbour Players in the past, and was also keen to help out.

All three performers will be doing a set oftheir own music, and finishing the evening off playing together with the band.

“I’m feeling very blessed and grateful,”said Peterson.

Come on out andsupport this worthy cause and enjoy whatpromises to be an eve-ning of first class enter-tainment.

Concert details:

Where: Holy TrinityAnglican Church, 1962Murray Road, Sooke

When: Saturday, Feb. 4, doors open at 7:30p.m.

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com ARTS • 13

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTARTS & ENTERTAINMENTMusicians get together to play for Bobbie-Jo

Submitted photo

Local musicians, left to right, Dave Gallant, Thom Southwood and Gord Phillips will be playing a benefit concert for Bobbie-Jo Peterson on February 4. On the right, Bobbie-Jo Peterson.

Attention All Preschoolers And Their Families!

Bring your 3 & 4 year olds to come play and learn about getting ready for Kindergarten!

For more information, email [email protected]

Open House Tourshappening at all SD62 Elementary Schools

on Mon. & Tues. Feb. 27 & 289am - 2pm

SD62 invites you to come explore!

Mon. Feb. 13 1-3 pm John MuirWed. Feb. 15 1-3 pm ColwoodThurs. Feb. 16 1-3 pm Ruth KingTues. Feb 21 5-7 pm MillstreamThurs. Feb. 23 1-3 pm Hans Helgesen

Drop by for snacks, songs, crafts and important information to make the transition into Kindergarten smooth and fun!

All events located in the StrongStart rooms.

2012 KICK OFF MEETING

Potlatch Room, Sooke Harbour House

to volunteer. Many kinds of skills needed. Bring a great attitude and come have fun with us!

Join Sooke Fine Art Society and receive 10% off all items in the Gallery Shop.

Something excit ing around every corner !

Page 14: Sooke News M irror

14 • www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

M EAT & PO U LTRY | F I S H & S EAFO O D Check Out This Week’s MONEY S*

www.fairwaymarkets.comPhotos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

ORGANICORGANIC

946 mL Carton

GranolaBarsNature’s Path

175-210 Gram Box

Head & Shoulders

400-420 mL Bottle

12 x 355 mL Tin + Dep

CerealMuslixKellogg’sAssorted

450 Gram Box

570-650 Gram Loaf

10 Kg Bag

ChickenBreastsFresh LilydaleZam ZamBonelessSkinless

15.41 Kg

OrganicBeverageVitasoy

284 mL Tin

MushroomsMoney’sPieces and StemsSalted

Rock FishBC WatersWeather PermittingFresh Whole

3.13 Lb

for

WholePinkSalmonBC Waters FrozenHead Off Wild

2.18 Lb

Soft Drinks 12 x 500 mL Btl

6 x 591 mL Btl

12 x 355 mL Tin

for

699Lb

Hot CrossBunsFresh Baked

6’s

425 Gram Tin

ChiliStagg Assorted

10 x 180 mL Carton + Dep

BeverageKool-Aid JammersAssorted

FlourAll PurposeWhiteGreat Plains

8.80 Kg

PorkTenderloinCanadian PremiumGrain Fed Fresh BonelessTwin Pack

Pork Sirloin

Canadian PremiumGrain FedFresh Boneless

5.93 Kg

269Lb

399Lb

HabitantAssorted

CookiesDareUltimate Assorted

MayonnaiseHellmann’sAssorted

796 mL Tin 325-350 Gram Bag 750-890 mL Jar/Bottle

ChickenBreastsFresh FryingBC GrownAll SizePackages

6.57 Kg

600-700 Gram Box

Rice Brown

GrainMinute Rice

Your Choice

CheeziesHawkins

210 Gram Bag

Smart Bread

Grain WheatDempster’sAssorted

Garlic CoilSchneiders

Per 100 Gram

89¢

BathroomTissue

Royale

Non-AlchoholicBeverageMolsonExel Beer

298Lb

349

Cooked

Lay’s Assorted

599 199

2/$4for

349

48¢Per 100 G

FreshMusselsPrince Edward

Island

In the Shell

199

buyBC™4.37 Kg

Pork Sirloin RoastCanadian Premium

Grain Fed

Family Pack

Fresh Boneless

198Lb

Grilling SteakT-Bone or Porterhouse

Canada Grade AA

or Higher

Family Pack

15.17 Kg

688Lb

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Look for the football f

Your SUPER SNACK Headquarters!

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McCainAssorted

3 Grand Prize Winners Contest Clos

Enter to Win “McCaiSliced BaconFletcher’s Dry CuredFarmer Cut 500 Gram Package

Marinated PorkProductsRocky Mountain AssortedFrozen 600-650 Gram Box

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Diamond Willow FrozenOrganic Beef568 Gram Box

Luncheon MeatBuddig Assorted55-65 Gram Package

Turkey SausageLilydale Daystarters375 Gram Package

Sliced Turkey 499

329

Ea

89¢Ea

Ea

Lilydale DaystartersBacon Flavoured375 Gram PackageORGANIC

69¢Per 100 G

98¢Per 100 Gram

for2/$5for2/$6for

599

fofofofofofofofofofofofofofofofoforrrrrrrrrrf99¢ 459

2/$5for

399

2/$4for

buyBC™

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Page 15: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com • 15

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Nanaimo North Town Centre4750 Rutherford Rd., Nanaimo Port Alberni Plaza3737–10th Ave., Port Alberni

STORE HOURSAll Locations: 8am–10pm except Sidney-By-The-Sea: 8am–9pm

1 2 3 4 5 6WE D TH U R FR I SAT S U N M O NF E B R U A R Y

2 0 12FR E S H FAR M & O R GAN I C PR O D U C E

1.5 Kg Package

640 mL Bottle 200 Gram Package

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PotatoHashbrowns

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3 Cheese BeefLasagnaBassili’s BestFrozen

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BeansBush’s BestAssorted

398 mL Tin

295 mL Tin

OrangeJuiceMinute MaidAssortedFrozen

100-454 Gram Package

Snacks

Christie

725 mL Bottle

FishSauceGolden Boy

414-475 mL Bottle

SaladDressingKraftAssorted

Lb

YogurtVanilla PlusIsland Farms

CannedVegetablesDel MonteSelected

650 Gram Tub 341-398 mL Tin

1 Litre Bottle

PicklesBick’sRegularSelected

Cocktail

Mott’s

1.89 Litre Bottle + Dep

199

GlutinousRice BallsWith Sesame FillingSpring Home Frozen

for

Ham

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Per 100 Gram 600-700 Gram Package

Cheese

Kraft

Your Choice + Dep

BroccoliCrownsCalifornia No. 1FreshTop Only

Lb

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TomatoesUS No. 1Florida GrownLarge Size

MediumGrainRiceRhee Chun

40 Lb Bag 400 Gram Package

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AvocadosImportedHass

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2.18 Kg

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Carrots US No. 1 Peeled Green Giant 2 Lb Bag

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for

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ses February 6, 2012 465-900 Gram Pkg

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Page 16: Sooke News M irror

16 • www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 8.99 EACH

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LIMIT 6, AFTER LIMIT 10.69 EACH

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 8.47 EACH LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 7.99 EACH

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 12.97 EACH

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (fl avour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2011 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

Prices are in effect until Thursday, February 2, 2012 or while stock lasts.

$25 GIFT CARD

FREE*

*With this coupon and a purchase of at least $250 before applicable taxes

at Real Canadian Superstore locations (excludes purchase of tobacco,

alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets,

all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and

any other products which are provincially regulated) we will give you a

$25 President’s Choice® gift card. Limit one coupon per family and/or

customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented

to the cashier at time of purchase. $25 President’s Choice® gift card will

be cancelled if product is returned at a later date and the total value of

product(s) returned reduces the purchase amount below the $250

threshold (before applicable taxes). Valid from Friday, January 27th, until

closing Thursday, February 2nd, 2012. Cannot be combined with any

other coupons or promotional offers.

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GREAT BRANDS

atGREAT PRICES!

with $250 purchase

At participating Real Canadian Superstore®. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at the time of purchase.

Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges.

100

699

2/400

499

299

340 mL

selected varieties, 675-750 mL

selected sizes & varieties

selected varieties, 60-240 tablets

selected varieties, 725 mL

Softsoap liquid hand soap

Pantene haircare shampoo or conditioner

Mennen or Lady Speed Stick

Jamieson vitamin C or D

exact™ body lotion

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each

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each

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product of Guatemala, Honduras or Costa Rica

condensed, selected varieties, case of 12 X 284 mL675 g, Just Right, 475 g, Corn Flakes,

750 g or Vector, 400 g

regular or diet, selected varieties, 24 X 355 mL

club size, cut from Canada AA beef or higher

product of Canada, Canada fancy grade

12’s

selected varieties, not from concentrate, refrigerated, 3.78 L

selected varieties, 2.95 L, 64 washloads

PC® chicken wings

fresh cantaloupe

Campbell’s soupKellogg’s Two Scoops raisin bran cereal

Coca Cola soft drinks

T-bone steak

fresh Gala or Granny Smith apples

Valuplus hot dog buns or hamburger buns

Tropicana orange juice

Sunlight liquid laundry detergent

each

each

eacheach

each

/lb 13.18/kg

each

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919776 236700

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equal to .75 /lb

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Page 17: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LIFESTYLES • 17

Jade Lothrop photo

Reader’s Photo of the Week

Fifteen-year-old Jade Lothrop was down at the Rotary Pier where she caught these gulls in her camera lens. Reader’s Photo of the Week is sponsored by Ellen Bergerud. Send your good quality jpegs to: editor@sookenewsmirror .com and we will publish them as space permits.

Protect yourself while using social mediaDid you know that

nearly half of those who use social media don’t enhance the default privacy settings on their user profiles? The first step in using social media in a pri-vacy enhancing way is learning how to protect your personal informa-tion online.

In recognition of International Data Pri-vacy Day, the Govern-ment of British Colum-bia encourages citi-zens, private organiza-tions and public bodies to learn some simple tips on how to pro-tect personal informa-tion online, and be pri-vacy aware while using social media. Changing your privacy settings on social media sites is one of many ways you can take control over what information

remains private and what is accessible to others.

Quick tips for using social media:

• Do not provide any more information than is necessary or asked for. When registering for a service, the nec-essary fields are often marked with an (*) asterisk. Only fill out these fields.

• Be aware of who is collecting, using or dis-closing your informa-tion - just because you are on one site, doesn’t mean your personal information will be restricted to that site.

• Personal boundar-ies are just that - per-sonal. Protect the per-sonal privacy of others by not posting their information, including their name, address, photo, phone number

or anything else about them.

• Think of your pass-word-recovery ques-tions. Information com-monly used to recover a password should be kept private. This includes your mother’s maiden name, your pet’s name, your favou-rite books and movies or the street you grew up on.

• Personal details are not necessary to communicate personal experience. Be general when appropriate (in a forum) and detailed when necessary (in a private message).

• Carefully go through your privacy settings and adjust the settings to protect your per-sonal information. Social media sites often update privacy settings so make it a habit to regularly

review your profile. British Columbia was

the first province to introduce social media guidelines for public service employees. In addition to being a national leader among provincial govern-ments, B.C. is also well ahead of much of the private sector, where many companies have yet to take this step.

Resources: For more information

about how citizens, organizations and pub-lic bodies can protect information and data security, please visit the Office of the Chief Information Officer: www.cio.gov.bc.ca/cio/priv_leg/index.page

A guide for public bodies using social media: www.cio.gov.bc.ca/local/cio/priv_leg/documents/foippa/

FOIPPA_GuidePublic-BodiesSocialMedia.pdf

By phone, people can access more infor-mation by calling B.C.’s Privacy and Access Hel-pline at 250 356-1851 in Victoria or toll free at 1 800 663-7867.

B.C. Government Social Media Guide-lines: http://www.gov.bc.ca/citz/citizens_engagement/some_guidelines_master.pdf

Carefree One level living with a bonus basement area partially fi nished and ideal for a hobby or workshop along with an over sized garage with 220 wiring and plumbing all on a third of an acre. $399,900

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Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30am - 9:00 pm Sat. 9:30 am - 5:30 pm Sun. 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

VICTORIA

NEW LOCATION: 3170 TILLICUM RD. LOWER LEVEL OUTSIDE OF TILLICUM CENTRE

250-642-6112info@sookereg ionchamber. com

Thursday March 1, 2012

Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce Awards of

Excellence andMini Trade Show

7:00 - 9:00 @ Prestige Hotel

Tickets $25

available at the Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce offi ce

250-642-6112

****

Save the date!

Brendan Herlihy Time for a move?

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Quality built 2008 custom home situated on private

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features open concept kitchen/dining area with

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Page 18: Sooke News M irror

18 • NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRRORChristine Vopel photos

Recycling and

reusingOn a sunny afternoon in Sooke Ben Caspersen was spotted melting lead for weights to hold down his crab pots.

We’re extending the Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit and increasing the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit. And that helps small business grow. To learn more about the BC Jobs Plan, or to share your ideas, visit BCJobsPlan.ca

Encourageinvestment.

Growsmall business,

right hereat home.

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Trains, Model Boats, Victoria Military Modellers, Cats, Let’s Talk Science , Victoria Bug Zoo and more!

Hobby Show Feb 3 – 5

Page 19: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com LIFESTYLES • 19

Learning how to dance in the rainTough economy separates local families Christine VopleSooke News Mirror

When economic mar-kets around the world collapsed in 2008 spi-ralling a large percent-age of the working class into financial chaos—more and more fam-ily men felt drawn to move from small towns to large construction camps tucked away in the boonies of Alberta.

Lured by the promise of a great starting wage, they accepted tempo-rary contracts hoping to secure full time work that would pay enough to support their grow-ing families back home.

Travis Dezall is one of these men. He joined an Alberta-based com-pany offering a compet-itive salary and excel-lent benefits in May 2011. Dezall has been able to pay his monthly mortgage payments and make ends meet by accepting eight-month

construction contracts. His temporary new home is a 2,500-person camp hidden in the bush 65 kms north of Fort McMurray. The temperature can drop to – 30 but luckily Travis is renovating a kitchen indoors. He is on night-shift, working 12-hours at a time, two weeks on, one week off.

In the camps one day

melts into the next and most men start a count down upon arrival. Their first day consists of being herded single file into a 2,500 person-size locker room to retrieve their meagre possessions that will provide them minimal comforts for the next two weeks. Meals con-sist of bland cafeteria food, cooked to serve

hundreds, where quan-tity weighs more than quality.

Dezall spends his days reframing walls and putting down dry-wall; monotonous and time-consuming work. When he has put down their tools after a 12-hour day, he and two B.C. friends, often watch a hockey game and drink a few beers but things aren’t always peaceful. On Christmas day, six alcohol-fuelled fights broke out, which led to a series of four suspensions or site bans, which meant the workers in ques-tion were instructed to leave the camp and for-bidden to return.

“I would guess the camps are very similar to living in prison,” said Dezall who chooses to mingle only with those he works with. The camps have a zero tolerance drug policy and they have unannounced drug raids with sniffer dogs.

The majority of the workers come from small B.C. towns — they make up an interesting mix of carpenters, elec-tricians and plumbers.

“Most guys here worked for large B.C. construction compa-nies. Around May 2011 they got laid off and came up here,” said Dezall.

Women exist in the camps but they act as housekeepers and human resources mak-ing up the remaining five per cent of the camp population. The money holds them all captive.

“You can’t get paid near what you can here anywhere else in B.C.,” said Dezall. The start-ing wage for a carpen-ter is between $31 and $36/ hour with electri-cians receiving $48.

Dezall regularly flies home to Sooke to be with his wife, Petrina Dezall and their two boys. One week, how-ever, is often not long enough.

“It’s tough to go home and be with my boys and then have to leave,” he said.

To come home every night to his fam-ily, Dezall would need a working relationship

Christine Vopel photo

Petrina Dezall with Madae, left, and Venice.

Cont’d on page 20

WINNER OF VOTING CONTEST IS

LILLY WASSCOME IN AND COLLECT YOUR

$75 GIFT CERTIFICATE

GRAND OPENING SPECIALFEBRUARY 4 AND 5 ONLY

SOFT VANILLA ICE CREAM CONEFOR ONLY $1 (plus tax)

(50 cents of every purchase going toSooke Soccer Artifi cial Turf Fund)

www.sookeriverstoreandgrill.ca or 250-642-0733

All Community events which purchase a display ad will now appear in our current community event calendar at no charge. All FREE EVENTS will be listed at no charge. Space permitting.

What’s Up in SookeWhat’s Up in Sooke This WeekThis Week

COMMUNITY CALENDAR DEADLINE: THURSDAY @ 3PMItems for Community Calendar must be non-commercial

and free to the public. Please limit to 25 words.

SHOPPERSDRUG MART 250-642-5229

Wed.Wed.Feb 1.Feb 1.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Drop-in ladies darts - 1 Drop-in ladies darts - 1 p.m. Shuffl eboard - 6:30 p.m. Shuffl eboard - 6:30 p.m.p.m.SOOKE SOOKE TOASTMASTERS CLUTOASTMASTERS CLUBBMeets at Village Foods Meets at Village Foods Meeting Room Every Meeting Room Every Wed at 7:00 p.m. Wed at 7:00 p.m. Everyone welcome. Everyone welcome. Contact Allan Eastguard Contact Allan Eastguard at 250-642-7520.at 250-642-7520.

Thurs.Thurs. Feb. 2Feb. 2UNDER THE “I”UNDER THE “I”

Regular bingo games Regular bingo games are scheduled in the are scheduled in the fi remen’s lounge at the fi remen’s lounge at the municipal hall today from municipal hall today from 12:45 to 3 p.m. 12:45 to 3 p.m. ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGION Cribbage - 7 p.m. Cribbage - 7 p.m. PRESCHOOL PRESCHOOL

STORYTIME STORYTIME

THURSDAYS: 10:30-THURSDAYS: 10:30-

11:00 A.M.11:00 A.M.

Join us for stories, songs, Join us for stories, songs, rhymes, fi ngerplays, rhymes, fi ngerplays, puppet shows and more. puppet shows and more. Ages 3-5. To register call Ages 3-5. To register call 250-642-3022.250-642-3022.

Sat.Sat.Feb 4.Feb 4.ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION EVERY LEGION EVERY SATURDAYSATURDAY

MMeat draweat draw 3:00 PM3:00 PM

Mon.Mon.Jan. 30Jan. 30ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGION Euchre - 7 p.m. Darts - 7:30.Euchre - 7 p.m. Darts - 7:30.

Sun.Sun.Feb 5.Feb 5.

Tues.Tues.January 31January 31YOUTH CLINICYOUTH CLINICHarbour Family Medical Harbour Family Medical Clinic 6625 Sooke Rd. Clinic 6625 Sooke Rd. Tuesdays 4-7 p.m. Tuesdays 4-7 p.m. 642-4233.642-4233. FIRST FOODSFIRST FOODSTuesdays, 10:00-11:30 a.m.Tuesdays, 10:00-11:30 a.m.at the Sooke Child, Youth and at the Sooke Child, Youth and Family Centre (CASA building)Family Centre (CASA building)2145 Townsend Road 2145 Townsend Road Contact 250.642.5464 for more Contact 250.642.5464 for more information.information.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Texas Hold’em - 6 p.m., Texas Hold’em - 6 p.m., darts - 7:30darts - 7:30

Fri.Fri. Feb 3. Feb 3. VITAL VITTLES FREE VITAL VITTLES FREE LUNCHLUNCH

Every Friday. 11:30-1:00 Every Friday. 11:30-1:00 p.m. Holy Trinity Church p.m. Holy Trinity Church on Murray Rd. Everyone on Murray Rd. Everyone welcome.welcome.

ROYAL CANADIAN ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONLEGIONDrop-in darts - 8 p.m. Drop-in darts - 8 p.m. Steak Night 6:00-7:30 Steak Night 6:00-7:30 pm. Only $11.00.pm. Only $11.00.FAMILY LITERACY DAYFAMILY LITERACY DAY Join us for family story Join us for family story time from 11:00 a.m. to time from 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Everyone 11:30 a.m. Everyone welcome; for more welcome; for more information or to register information or to register call 250-642-3022.call 250-642-3022.BABYTIME FRIDAYS: BABYTIME FRIDAYS:

10:30-11:00 A.M.10:30-11:00 A.M.

Babytime is a fun-based Babytime is a fun-based program for babies aged program for babies aged 0-18 months. To register 0-18 months. To register call 250-642-3022.call 250-642-3022.

SUPERBOWL 46starts

3:30 p.m.

Page 20: Sooke News M irror

with a busy local con-tractor in order to earn more as a self-employed carpenter.

“You work a lot harder when you work for yourself but you get to go home at the end of the day,” he said. Unfortunately the way the economy is going he can’t see it improv-ing any time soon.

“I’m afraid it’s going to get worse, there’s no good work on the Island,” said Travis.

Dezall’s wife, Petrina, is a mom, surfer and businesswoman raising two boys, Madae and Venice, aged one and-a-half and and three-and-a-half. She juggles motherhood, her own make up studio and contracts in Victoria.

“I don’t get over-whelmed easily but when you’re running your own business and have two children it gets tough,” she said.

In the summer of 2010 she began work-ing for a television pro-duction and short film company. She loves working from contract to contract because, “It allows me to be with my kids.”

Unfortunately, those contracts often start very early and run on weekends, which cre-ate a conflict.

“No government child care program that we’ve found supports week-end schedules. The hardest thing is finding a 5:15 a.m. sitter for me to get to Victoria by six a.m.,” said Petrina.

She feels Sooke needs to have more family-oriented restau-rants as well as more child care amenities.

Although raising chil-dren in Sooke has its advantages.

“Sooke is great because we live close to the beach and can go out on our boat. My kids are more in tune with the cycles of nature having grown up here,” said Petrina. Her baby Madae’s first word was ‘Tree.’ Unfor-tunately, nature is not always enough.

“We were naïve in thinking it’d be easy to find full-time work here in Sooke,” Petrina said.

She believes, “all job postings should go through the communi-ties first,” which would allow family men first bid at carpentry jobs rather than having out-side contractors com-muting daily and scoop-ing up all the work.

Even with Travis liv-ing part-time in Alberta, Petrina is not forced to raise her kids com-pletely alone.

“We have a strong community of friends, which really helps. They come to me for the most part,” said Petrina. Living as a single person, “You’re used to predictabil-ity but with children you can’t ever predict what’s going to hap-pen next. You’ve got to learn how to dance in the rain.”

Camp life allows little time for families and relationships can suffer. Travis regularly sched-ules a time to speak to the family but says, “It’s hard to parent over the phone.”

“The kids text and call dad all the time, thank god for iPhones,” said Petrina. Her hus-band agrees. “When

they come home from the beach and tell me all about it, it makes me smile,” he said.

When Travis set off on his first contract Petrina had no doubt it was the right thing to do.

Most family men at the camps experience relationship stress due to a combination of dis-tance, money issues and living in two increas-ingly different worlds from their partner.

“It can become dif-ficult to relate to one another,” he said.

At the end of two weeks it’s time to go home and then Travis begins to relax.

“I feel free when I’m leaving the camp,” he

said. The first thing he

notices about home in Sooke? The colours. “It’s real green and that first surf feels refresh-ing,” Travis said.

Is he going to continue working construction in Alberta? Probably he said, as long as the money is this good, and the bills are being paid. Petrina agrees, “We’re growing together and we’re going to make the best of what we have,” she said.

Would the Dezalls recommend this to other young families?

Definitely. “I wouldn’t want to do this forever but so far it’s worth it,” said Travis.

20 • LIFESTYLES www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Cont’d from page 19

Heather Williamson photo

Run to liveOn Jan. 16, Port Renfrew welcomed Scott Cannata, fifth from left, and his entourage into the community. Cannata embarked on an incredible journey from St. John’s Newfoundland on May 1, 2011 running 42 km/day, across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He ended his run on the beach in Port Renfrew in a snow storm, running into the Pacific Ocean with his grandmother, second on right, at his side. For more information go to Scott’s web site @ www.theruntolive.com.

Offer valid Saturday and Sunday, February 4 and 5, 2012, before noon, at all participating RONA stores. Get 15% cash back of your purchase in RONA gift cards with any purchase of $35 or more before taxes. The 15% cash back in RONA gift cards is calculated on the total purchase amount, before taxes. Applicable on merchandise purchased in store and in one transaction. Only cash and carry purchases paid by cash, debit or major credit cards are eligible. This promotion includes install labour as long as the labour is paid in full during the promotion dates. Offer not applicable to gift card purchases. Cannot be combined with any other offer, but applies to products already on sale in the flyer (except for ‘’Steal of a deal’’ offers and category rebates). Not available for in-store accounts or clients with contractual agreements. The amount received in a RONA gift card is applicable on your next purchase only and the use of this gift card shall mean the acceptance of the terms and conditions written on the back of the card. The card will expire 12 months after the activation date. Certain conditions apply. Details in store.

IN RONA GIFT CARDS*

ON YOUR PURCHASE

SATURDAY AND SUNDAYFEBRUARY 4 AND 5BEFORE NOON

ONLY

CASH BACK

*Minimum purchase of $35 before taxes

RONA Home & Garden Langford Only

RONA Langford850 Langford Parkway

Victoria250.478.6680

Capital Regional District

Date: Wednesday, February 8, 2012Time: 4:00 - 8:00pmPlace: Otter Point Fire Hall 3727 Otter Point Road, Sooke

The Capital Regional District, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations’ Fish and Wildlife Branch and the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation are collaborating on a project to improve the Milligan Road foreshore access to Kemp Lake in support of recreational sport fishing and other recreational activities. The project is to be funded through grants and donations.

Please attend to find out more about this exciting initiative and provide your comments, or alternatively, you can review the proposal and questionnaire on the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area website at http://www.crd.bc.ca/jdf and return comments to the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area office by mail to PO Box 283, Sooke, BC V9Z 0S9, by fax to 250.642.5274, or by email to [email protected] no later than March 2nd, 2012.

Notice of Open HouseKemp Lake Angling Infrastructure Improvement Proposal

Page 21: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com CLASSIFIEDS • 21

STUDY.WORK.S U . OS U .D.

www.sprottshaw.com

JOIN US ON:Sprott-ShhawCOMMUNITY COLLEGES i n c e 1 9 0 3

THE

GIFT OF EDUCATIONRegister for any Sprott-Shaw Community College program between Dec. 1, 2011 - Feb. 29, 2012 and receive up to $1000* towards tuition.Learn more at sprottshaw.com/gift*Some conditions apply

250.384.8121

TRAIN TO BE A PRACTICAL NURSEIN VICTORIATODAY!With the aging population, Healthcare & Healthcare providers are some of the hottest career opportunities available. Practical Nursing is one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare. Train locally for the skills necessary in this career eld.

CALL VICTORIA:

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

DEATHS

NELSON, JAMES (JIMMY)Mar. 4, 1943 - Jan. 20 2012

After a long battle with can-cer Jimmy passed away peacefully with his caregiver Dannette by his side. He is predeceased by his father Leonard, mother Esther and brother Bill. Survived by brothers Bob, Dave (Joan), and sister Mary.Children Doug, FranGrandchildren Gerald and JulieFamily and friends are invit-ed to pay their respects at Sooke Legion, on Sun., Feb. 5, from 1-3 pm

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Juan de Fuca Salmon Restoration Society

Tuesday March 6, 2012, 7pm

Charters River Salmon Centre

2895 Sooke River RoadAll Welcome

Info: 250-642-4200

BINGOBonanzas, Cracker

Jack, Regular games

Every Tuesday & Thursday

12:45 - 3:00 pm

Drop-In Centreacross from Petrocan

on Sooke Rd in downtown Sooke

Reasonably priced lunch available

Must be 19 yrs 250-642-6898

for more info

CALL FOR ENTRIES10TH ANNUAL

Kitty Coleman WoodlandArt & Bloom Festival.

Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show.

Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21

Applications for Artisans are available at

woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

INFORMATION.

CONTACT LOAN Cupboard call 250-389-4607. Need a ride? Call 250-389-4661.

JUAN DE FUCA Emergency Program Offi ce: 250-642-2266 Co-ordinators Homes: 250- 642-3772. Cellular: 250-883-0607. Email: [email protected]. Provincial Contact: 1-800-663-3456

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INFORMATION

SOOKE CRISIS & Referral Centre, 2043 Church Rd. Open 10am-1pm, Mon.-Fri. 250-642-0215.

SOOKE MEALS on Wheels, Box 109, Sooke, BC V9Z 0E5. Alma Anslow 250-642-2184.

PERSONALS

DATING SERVICE. Long-term/short-term relationships, free to try!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

TRAVEL

GETAWAYS

LONG BEACH - Ucluelet - Deluxe waterfront cabin,

sleeps 6, BBQ.Storm watchers 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299.Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

LONG BEACH - Ucluelet - Deluxe waterfront cabin,

sleeps 6, BBQ.Storm watchers 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299.Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop mort-gage & maintenance pay-ments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free Consul-tation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL

BRING THE family! Sizzling specials at Florida’s best beach! New Smyrna Beach, Florida. See it all at: www.nsbfl a.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166

HAWAII ON the Mainland, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica “the most friendly coun-try on earth”! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNI-CIANS Salmon Arm GM on Shuswap Lake in beautiful British Columbia requires full-time journeyman automotive technicians. Email: [email protected] fax: 250-832-5314.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 cop-ies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition!

Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335

or [email protected]

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Be Your Own Boss! Attention Locals! People req. to work

from home online. Earn $500-$4500+ P/T or F/T. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess.

EARN EXTRA cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings for men & women. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No exp. needed. www.HWC-BC.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

AUTOMATED TANK Manu-facturing Inc. requires a Spray Foam & Paint Applicator. Must have min. 2 yrs exp., and must be in good physical health. Great wages, benefi ts, full in-surance package 100% paid by company, savings plan for retirement, profi t sharing bo-nus, long term employment. Wages $33-$35/hr. Join a win-ning team. Call 780-846-2231 for appointment or send re-sume to: Fax 780-846-2241 or email Blaine Ross at [email protected] or Basil Inder at [email protected].

EXPERIENCED DRILLERS,derrickhands, motorhands and fl oorhands. Seeking full rig crews. Paying higher than in-dustry rates and winter bonus. Send resume c/w valid tick-ets. Fax 780-955-2008; i n fo@tempcod r i l l i ng . com. Phone 780-955-5537.

EXPERIENCED PARTS per-son required for progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wag-es, full benefi ts and RRSP bo-nuses plus moving allowanc-es. Our 26,000ft2 Store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Ed-monton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRe-gion.com. Send Resumes to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: [email protected].

MEDICAL TRAINEES needed now! Hospitals & Doctors need well trained staff. No experi-ence needed! Local training & job placement available. Call for more info! 1-888-748-4126.

CHILDCARE

SUNRIVER CHILDCARECentre has openings for ages 2 1/2 - 5. Open to all Sooke residents. 250-642-0608

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Main-tenance Career. FAA ap-proved program. Financial aid if qualifi ed- Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Main-tenance (877)818-0783.

Become a Psychiatric Nurse- train locally via distance edu-cation, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month pro-gram is recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t funding may be available.

Toll-free 1-87-STENBERGwww.stenbergcollege.com

COASTAL LOGSCALING COURSE

Nanaimo Based LogScaling Co. is seeking

motivated students.Course to Start in March

(5 days/week.)Government Exam in June.

E-mail for further [email protected]

Looking for a NEW career?www.bcjobnetwork.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

TRAIN TO be an Apart-ment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of gradu-ates working. 31 years of suc-cess! Government certifi ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

HELP WANTED

An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty mechanic for fi eld and shop work. We require Cat Doz-er/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780-723-5051

THE LEMARE GROUP is seeking a Machinist. Full-time union wages. Please send resumes by fax to (250)956-4888 or by email to offi [email protected].

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HELP WANTED

DELIVERY PERSONS

TELUSYELLOW PAGES

Mature persons with car or truck to deliver Telus Yellow Pages in Victoria, Langford, Sidney, and Sooke areas.

Opportunity also exists for:

FUNDRAISERClubs, Charitable Organiza-tions, Schools / Church Groups, Sport Teams or Individuals!

EARN MONEY delivering the Telus Yellow Pages in the Victoria, Langford, Sid-ney and Sooke areas. No selling involved. Call, fax or visit online for more info.

PDC LogisticsTel: 1-800-663-4383 Mon.- Fri. 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Fax: 1-604-420-4958 orVisit: www.pdclogistics.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HELP WANTED

THE LEMARE GROUP is seeking Forestry Engineers to assist in road and cut-back design. For those that display the qualities we de-sire we will provide remu-neration that is above indus-try standard. Send resumes to the Planning Manager at (250)956-4888 or email [email protected].

THE SOOKE NEWS Mirror cautions readers about send-ing money to obtain informa-tion about any employmentopportunities

RESIDENT MANAGERReq’d for 28 unit building,some exp. an asset. Fax re-sume to 604-669-1801

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Looking for a NEW job?www.bcjobnetwork.com

Call us for Complimentary

GIFT BASKET

Newcomers to Sooke

& Surrounding Area:

Judy 250-642-2268

New Moms:

Sonia 250-642-2120

Bonanzas, Cracker Jack, Regular gamesEvery Tuesday & Thursday12:45 - 3:00 p.m.NEW LOCATIONNEW LOCATION

SENIORSDROP-IN CENTRE

Fireman’s LoungeSooke Municipal Hall2205 Otter Point Rd.

Reasonably pricedLunch available

Must be 19 years

250-642-6898for more info

Page 22: Sooke News M irror

22 • CLASSIFIEDS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Volunteer OpportunityThe Capital Regional District(CRD) is looking for a local coordinator for the CRD’s Juan de Fuca Emer-gency Program, which includes the communities of Malahat, Willis Point/Durance, East Sooke, Otter Point, Shirley, Jordan River and Port Renfrew. This opportunity requires a dedicated leader to work with our many volunteers throughout the communities in preparing for emergencies or disasters.

This is largely a volunteer based position, with a monthly stipend paid to recognise the time and effort the role requires.

The successful applicant will have good communi-cations, team building, presentation and emergency management skills. An established background in Emergency Management as a volunteer or career is essential, and recognised training in same would be an asset.

A full position description and application details are available by contacting;

Ian Elliott, Manager, Electoral Area Emergency Pro-grams, CRD

[email protected]

EVENT COORDINATOR

Sooke Harbour Resort & Marina is currently seeking an individual to fi ll the role of Event Coordinator for the 2012 Salmon Classic Fishing Derby. This position requires a highly organized individual with the following skills and experience:

Familiarity with salmon fi shing Profi cient use of Word, Excel, Outlook and other software

applications

Excellent communication skills (written, oral and telephone)

Strong planning & execution skills Individuals with previous experience in event management, charter fi shing and project management will be given preference.

The successful applicant must have their own transportation, valid drivers’ licence, cellular telephone and computer. Travel and personal expenses will be reimbursed.

This part time term position is available immediately. Part time employment (or contract) will be from January through September.

Sooke Harbour Resort & Marina is offering a competitive wage and benefi t package for this position.

Please forward your cover letter and resume to Michael Anderson by email to: [email protected] .

Seeking experiencedPROCESSOR OPERATOR

for falling & processing work on Vancouver Island.

Full time & year round employment. Excellent

wage & benefi t package. Possibility of relocation cost coverage for the

right applicant.TEL: 250-286-1148FAX: 250-286-3546 [email protected]

TRADES, TECHNICAL

MILLWRIGHT JOURNEY-MAN BCTQ certifi cation man-datory. Fulltime opening @ West Coast Reduction Ltd in Vancouver. Competitive wage and benefi ts. Email resumes to [email protected].

OINCOME PPORTUNITYHOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

HELP WANTED

MEDICAL/DENTAL

RN’s

Bayshore Home HealthIs currently seeking Regis-terd Nurses in the Sooke and Victoria areas to work with children with complex care needs. If you are an RN and love working with children, we would love to hear from you. Pediatric experience and TPN and central line skills are an asset, however, we do offer client specifi c training. Please send your resume and cover letter to our Burnaby location:

[email protected] or

fax to 1-866-686-7435

CLARK’S HOME RENOVATIONS(Family Owned & Operated Business)

Offi ce: 250-642-5598 Cell: 250-361-8136

• B.C. Business Licence • City Licence • WCB • Liability InsuranceFall Arrest Training & Equipment

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Service InstallationTubs, Surround, Sinks,

Taps, Vanity, Drains,

Hot Water Tanks

RenovationsRoofi ng, Framing, Drywall,

Bathroom, Kitchen, Laminate,

Decks, Fence, Painting

www.clarkshomerenovations.ca www.victoriahomerenos.ca

HELP WANTED

LEMARE GROUP in Port McNeill is seeking an Ac-counts Payable Clerk to join our team. Your skill set should include strong or-ganization skills, effective time management, attention to details, excellent commu-nication skills, computer liter-ate and accounting knowl-edge. Fax resume to 250-956-4888 or email [email protected]

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HELP WANTED

VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEERS

PERSONAL SERVICES

HEALTH PRODUCTS

$10 CASH back for every pound you lose. Herbal Magic. Lose Weight Guaranteed! Call Herbal Magic now at 1-800-827-8975 for more informa-tion. Limited time offer.

ESTHETIC SERVICES

CARRIE’SGel Nails

“BOOK NOW”FOR

VALENTINE’S DAY250-664-6236250-893-5419

Check out my nail pics onFacebook at

“Gel Nails by Carrie”GIFT CERTIFICATES

AVAILABLE

INSURANCE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DROWNING IN debts? Help-ing Canadians 25 years. Low-er payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid Bankruptcy! Free con-sultation.www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420.

www.pioneerwest.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PERSONAL SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certifi -cation, adoption property ren-tal opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CRIMINAL RECORD?Guaranteed Record Removal

since 1989. Confi dential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating

assures EMPLOYMENT &TRAVEL FREEDOM.

Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON(1-866-972-7366)

RemoveYourRecord.com

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

BUSINESS SERVICES

DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefi ts? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

SOOKE FAXCOPY CENTRE

Sooke’s Full service Copy Center!

Thermal Credit/Debitpaper rolls

2 1/4” x 75’ or 3” x 225’

Cash register andCalculator rolls

2 1/4” x 125’

1-6649 Sooke Road (across from Evergreen Mall)

Tel:250-642-3231 Fax: 250-642-7155www.sookecopycentre.comEmail:[email protected]

COMPUTER SERVICES

DRYWALL

GARDENING

JAY’SComplete Yard Maintenance

& landscaping Lawn & Garden ServiceNew Home Installation

Hedges* Gutters*HaulingPower Washing

Jason Wiley 250-514-1558

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

WE’RE ON THE WEB

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HAULING AND SALVAGE

ED’S HAULINGCheap disposal of

furniture, appliances, junk and what have you?

U&I type moving with covered pick-up truck.

Ed & Faye250-642-2398

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

ADDITION

MAGICIAN

* Decks* Siding

* Fencing* Bathrooms

* Kitchen Renovations* Building Maintenance

250-642-5882250-812-0968

& MOVING STORAGE

SOOKE MOVING ANDSTORAGE

Heated indoor storage, self contained, various sizes, 24 hr. security. outdoor storage available. Public access 9-5pm. Mon.- Sat. 2018 Idle-more Rd. 250- 642-6577www.sookemovingandstorage.com

PAINTING

JN PAINTING

“WCB Insured”

Reliable/References

Interior/Exterior

“Free Estimates”

20 Years Experience

250-812-8781

PLASTERING

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fi re-places. Bob, 250-642-5178.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

AFFORDABLE ROOFING

*new construction*re roofs *repairs

Call Deano

250-642-4075

STUCCO/SIDING

PATCHES, ADDITIONS, re-stucco, renos, chimney, water-proofi ng. Bob, 250-642-5178.

WELDING

DRIVER ENT.

LTD.

WELDINGMobile Units +++ Steel

Sales

250-642-0666

PETS

PETS

Registered Belgian Shepherd Tervuren. Import lines. 1-250-392-5531 [email protected]

WESTERN LABRADORS Perfect Yellow Pups CKC reg. Champ. Bloodlines. $1200. www.wes te r n lab rado rs . ca Wes 250-337-1814

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FUEL/FIREWOOD

TRUE CORDS4X4x8, $200Douglas Fir

250-642-2743

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FUEL/FIREWOOD

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest fi re-wood producer offers fi rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

CAN’T GET up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help! No obligation consultation. Com-prehensive warranty. Can be installed in less than 1 hour. Call now 1-866-981-6591.

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-981-5991

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

4 BOLT MAGS off Honda, Pocket Bike, smaller 8Ft Camper. Offers on all. 250-642-4075

STEEL BUILDINGS for all us-es! Beat the 2012 steel in-crease. Make an offer on sell-off models at factory and save thousands now! Call for free Brochure. 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170.

STEEL BUILDINGS steel of a deal - building sale! 20X24 $4798. 25X30 $5998. 30X42 $8458. 32X58 $12,960. 40X60 $15,915. 47X80 $20,645. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

COAL HARBOUR- Ocean-side retreat on N. Vancouver Island. 1750 sq. ft. 2 bdrm, 2 full bath, fi nished basement, deck, sauna, hot tub and new roof in 2011. Pad rent $300/mnth. All Major appli-ances incl. Auto/boat shed/ Fishing, boating, crabbing at your doorstep. $44,500. Call 250-949-6643.

HOUSES FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSESDamaged House?

Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale?

We will Buy your HouseQuick Cash & Private.Mortgage Too High and

House won’t sell?Can’t make payments?

We will Lease Your House,Make your Payments

and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053www.webuyhomesbc.com

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

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Stes avail. - Some Immed.1 Bdrm $860; 2 Bdrms $1120; 2 Bdrm & den $1125. Amenities incl’s indoor pool, fi tness facilities, above grnd and parkade pkg, on site laundry. Onsite staff avail.

Please call Sue or Elena250-380-6566

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PARK WEST APTS55 Bay Street

Stes avail. - some immed. 1 Bdrms from $875; 2 bdrms from $1125. Close to Vic-toria downtown, Save-On, Starbucks & transportation.

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WETHERBY APTSFOR SENIORS ONLY 55+

Spacious stes Avail. - some immed. Bach $750; 1 bdrm $890; 2 bdrms $1075 & up. Close to buses, Hillside Mall, doctors, dentists all within walking distance. Seniors lifestyle of convenience & comfort. On site laundry, so-cial room. Staff available.

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SEAGATE APTS 707 Esquimalt Road

Stes avail. - some immed. 1 bdrm $875 & up; 2 bdrms $1010 & up. Indoor pool, exercise rm and many other fi tness amenities. Full view of Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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Page 23: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com CLASSIFIEDS • 23

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A MUST see! 1 bdrm lakefront basement suite, sep ent. new home. Perfect for working couple. $1,200 a mth. N/S. Will take a pet into considera-tion, deposit required. Available Feb. 1. Please reply to [email protected] 250-642-5800, 250-896-0955

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QUIET, OPEN concept, 1 bed-room and den ground level suite. Located in Saseenos area of Sooke; overlooking the ocean. 827 sq.ft., newly paint-ed, separate entrance, small patio, all appliances, shared laundry, N/S, pets welcome, close to bus and Galloping Goose. $850-includes: hydro, water, internet and garbage pick-up. 250-818-4497

RENTALS

SUITES, LOWER

SOOKE- MAIN level, new small 1 bdrm, sep entrance, full bath, sep. W/D. NS/NP. $600+utils. Call 250-415-7991.

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1 BR ste. w/d, Feb 15, $750. Bach ste, $475. 250-642-2527

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AUTO FINANCING

FREE CASH back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery.

WANT A vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in February, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations ac-cepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

CARS

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 fi rm. 250-755-5191.

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted!We BUY Scrap Batteries

from Cars, Trucks etc.$4.00/ea. & up! Free pick-up

Island Wide. Min. 10(1)604.866.9004 Ask for Brad

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

To the community of Sooke,On behalf of Sarah Nickerson’s family,

we would like to extend our heartfelt

gratitude to all her friends for their

loving support and care over the years.

Being at the church service and reception

afterwards made us realize how many in

the community were watching over her.

We were not able to speak with everyone

personally - there were so many - but to

all of you please accept our appreciation

for your kindness.

The Nickerson Family

Sooke Says Just For You

www.sookenewsmirror.com

Read The Mirror

On-LineCOVER-TO-COVER

Now available in an easy to read downloadable and printable format.

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Page 24: Sooke News M irror

24 • SPORTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

Men’s basketball league to start this March

SPORTS

Christine VopelSooke News Mirror

Ever miss those high school basketball days? Tired of feeling like you’re too old to join a team or wish you could just shoot a few hoops and raise funds for high school teams at the same time? Then come join the Celtics — a first of its kind men’s basketball league tak-ing place on March 7.

The plan remains in the early stages with much still to be decided.

“I’m hoping to get four or more teams together to fund-raise money for the high school team,” said Peter McKay, a well-known basketball player and graduate of Edward Milne Commu-nity School who now possesses a teaching

degree from Vancou-ver Island University. “I grew up in Sooke and played basketball here but there was nowhere to go after high school. Not everyone has the time or money to drive to Langford to play basketball. There was a need for it for sure. Somewhere to play in Sooke,” he said.

Mckay estimates there will be two to three games running from 7-10 p.m. every Wednesday night at the high school until the middle of May. Ages 18 and up are accepted. After the first week in March the league would run for 10 weeks with three weeks of playoffs.

“Things like this have a tendency to get com-petitive on their own but I’m hoping people will just have fun, first

year is always the hard-est,” he said.

Trevor Bligh, an EMCS basketball coach of 17 years and main organizer of the men’s league supports Mck-ay’s initiative. “He’s fol-lowing a model shown to him by the Cowichan Secondary. It’s great exercise and you’re helping out a team. It also gives guys a place to play when it’s wet outside,” said Bligh. He estimates the league will be able to raise $850 a year for the high school team.

The costs are $100 a player, which includes a jersey. Those inter-ested in joining the men’s basketball league starting on March 7 can register with Trevor Bligh at 250-882-5279 or by e-mail: the [email protected]

Christine Vopel

Coach Trevor Bligh addresses his team: the Wolverines at EMCS.

Christine Vopel photo

He shoots, he scores.Jimmy Nex of U15 boys goes to kick the soccer ball at a tournament on Saturday at Fred Milne Park.

Christine Vopel photo

Jacob Gallant collides with opponent as he chases the ball at Saturday’s tournament.

SEAPARC STAR SEAPARC STAR of theof the WEEK WEEK✪✪The fi rst star of February is fi ve year old Isabelle Ouellette. She is a Kindergarten student

at Ecole Poirier where her favourite thing to do is play fl oor hockey in gym class. She likes

to help her friends with French because she already knows a lot of French words (thanks

to her Daddy). Isabelle is going into Level 2 in swimming lessons here at SEAPARC and

is learning how to skate so she can play hockey someday. She likes playing soccer and is

in her fi rst year of Ballet with Carole Cave Dance Studios. This artistic young lady enjoys

colouring, crafting, making her own jewellery (like her Mom), beading and painting!

She loves to draw princesses, castles, rainbows and anything else that has to do with

Fairy Tales! She is extremely excited about their upcoming family vacation to Disney

World in Florida. While she is there, she will go to a special Princess Day where she will

dress up, have a makeover and then have tea with the Disney Princesses in a Castle. She

is very good with electronics, computers and reading (she can read Snow White all by

herself)! Isabelle helps out at home by cleaning her room and taking care of their many

animals that include 2 dogs (Oscar Murrito and Jax), a fi sh named Sebastien and Daisy

the Cat who allows the dogs to drag her around the house by the ears! She loves camping

(especially roasting marshmallows) and she likes to collect sea shells when she goes to

the beach. Isabelle told us that she can hardly wait until summer because that’s when her

Grandparents come to visit from New Brunswick. She says she misses them so much and

wishes they lived close to her so she could see them all the time. Isabelle is a delightful

little girl with a huge sense of humour. She has contemplated becoming a Doctor when

she grows up; but at this time, her sights are set on being a police offi cer! What a great

career choice Isabelle, you would make an amazing police offi cer. Thank you for being

our SEAPARC Star of the Week Isabelle, have a great trip to Disney World

ISABELLE OUELLETTE

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Page 25: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com SPORTS • 25

Christine Vopel

The Initiation level hockey team played against Kerry Park on Sunday at SEAPARC.

TSN back to film the “Pro Chase”; Subaru Sooke Triathlon fea-tured in Triathlon Maga-zine Canada.

TSN will be return-ing again this year to film the “Pro Chase” at the Subaru Sooke Tri-athlon. The event will be nationally televised later in the year and will include more stun-ning shots of beautiful Sooke, B.C., plus foot-age of the Age Group races.

Some more exciting

news for Sooke this year: The Olympic Distance event at the Subaru Sooke Triathlon will bea Canadian Age Group Team qualifier for the 2013 World Champion-ships in London.

In the news: This month’s issue of Tri-athlon Magazine Can-ada profiled the “West Coast Spectacular” Subaru Sooke Triath-lon. Missed it in print? You can read the whole article online at: http://trialthlon magazine.ca

TSN to return to Sooke

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Page 26: Sooke News M irror

Atom C1

Dale’s Electric Sooke Thunderbirds Atom C1 beat the Victoria Rac-quet Club Kings 7-1 on Sunday. Sooke effi-ciently killed two penal-ties in the first period. Although the Thunder-birds were out shot eight to five, the first period ended without score.

Half way through the second period, stellar play by Jai Govender and Matthew Lyons put Sooke on the board with a power play goal.

The Kings tied the game soon after. In the third period, tenac-ity along the boards and aggressive fore checking combined with some fine passing brought Sooke’s offence to life. Braydon Blythe scored two and John Richardson, Dahlan Murphy Finley Arthurs and Blake Reymerink each added a goal.

Ryder Norman led Sooke’s defence by breaking up the offence of the Kings and smoothly moving the puck out their own end. Contributed by Michael Arthurs.

Bantam C Boys

Although missing their captain, Dryden

Alexander, as a result of a recently sustained lower body injury, the WES Ltd. (Wittich Envi-ronmental Services) Bantam “C” Boys rose to the challenge and provided a confident win on Saturday against the visiting Juan de Fuca C6 team.

Working on a hat trick, forward Brad Angus settled for two goals and an assist on a strong line which posted another goal and an assist from cen-tre Dominic Lacroix.

Additional goals by Chadwick Mason and alternate cap-tain, Ayden Ostropolski, with assists from Marco Carello, as well as Jared Purdy on defence, dem-onstrated the boys’ ability to work well as a team.

Strong fore-checking by Alec Scott also pro-vided opportunities to score by making it hard for the Grizzlies to clear their zone.

Taylor Haisell posted his third league shut out, with solid help from his defence-men who dominated the blue line and created a zone which made it difficult for the visiting team to set up plays and cycle the puck.

Assisted, as well, with good hustle from

Marco Carello to strip the puck on a break-away when the Grizzlies did manage to poke the puck through.

With two games left in the season, the boys seem to be enjoy-ing themselves and certainly make it fun hockey to watch from the bleachers.

Pee-Wee Girls

Marcotte’s Market-ing Pee-Wee girls team were ready for their home game on Sunday, Jan. 29.

In the first period, 2 great goals from Alyssa Lloyd and one from Rory Woods, give the girls a great advance.

In the second period a strong slap shot from Jennifer Simonis from the blue line gave another goal to the Sooke team.

And then, Kaitlin Mckelvey added one more goal on the board at the end of the sec-ond period bringing the score to 5-1 for the Sooke Pee-wee team.

Finally in the 3rd period, 2 goals from Morgan Couture, one more for Rory Woods, Kaitlin Mckelvey and Hailey Olejnik (first goal) closed the game with a huge score of 10-1.

A great performance from the 2 call-up from the Atom girls team, Zoe Tremblay (2 assists)and Maggie Mackinnon (1 assist and “A” on her jersey).

It’s always nice to see young players like Zoe and Maggie join our team, they are great assets to us, coach Steve says.

“Also, players like Emma Frish and Celina Palko who played very offensive, and aggres-sive today, it’s very nice to see how their hard work paid off!” he added.

Good job girls! Contributed by

Melanie Dube

Sooke Novice 3

After a loss the pre-vious week to the Vic-toria Icehawks Novice 4 team, your Sooke Novice 3 Thunderbirds stormed back in a big win against the Kerry Park Islanders C+ last Sunday at Seaparc.

The boys outpaced the visiting team scor-ing as much as the Islanders shot in a con-vincing 11 – 1 win.

Connor North was solid in the net mak-ing the key saves when needed as the defen-sive corp of Ethan Schwartz, Beau Hicks, Owen Phipps and Taio Croden minimized the opponents chances during the entire game.

Leading the team with a hat trick, Grant Gilbertson opened the scoring early propelling the boys to a 5 – 0 lead after the first period.

Luke Arden along with Jack Price and Kobe Knowles each scored twice keeping the pressure on the Islanders consistently in their end.

If not for the efforts of the Islanders goalie, who played very well, the final score would have been much higher.

Rounding out the scoring for your Thun-derbirds were Alex Kozinka and Nemo Anderson as the team skated to an effective win against a game Kerry Park team.

The boys have proven they are a fierce competitor and are looking forward to the

upcoming spring tour-nament.

The team would like to thank everyone who contributed dur-ing the last bottle drive especially the Prestige Hotel.

They promise to con-tinue to play hard and have fun as they repre-sent Sooke through out the region.

CENTRE ICE26 • SPORTS www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

The Royal Canadian LegionBr. #54 Phone: 250-642-5913

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WEDNESDAY’S Darts League 12:00 noon

Shuffl e Board 6:30 pm

MONDAY’S Short Mat Bowling 1-3 pm

Euchre 7 pm - Pool

Short Mat Bowling 1-3 pmDrop in Darts 8:00 pm

TUESDAY’S Texas Hold’em 6:45 pm - Pool

SATURDAY

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2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

Fax: 250-642-0541email: [email protected]

website: www.sooke.ca

BUSINESS LICENCES REQUIRED

JANUARY 2012

If you have not already done so -- be sure to renew or apply for your 2012 business licence. The Business Licence Bylaw

requires that all businesses operating in the District of Sooke be in possession of a valid Business Licence or a valid Inter-ministerial

Business Licence. (application online at www.sooke.ca).

Do you want to know if the contractor you have hired has a valid Business Licence? Just call the municipal offi ce and our friendly

staff will advise if the business is currently licenced.

UPCOMING PUBLIC MEETINGS

Finance and Administration Committee

Monday, February 6, 2012 at 7:00 pm

This schedule is subject to change. Please call 250-642-1634 to confi rm meetings.

Council meeting agendas may be viewed at www.sooke.ca

AGENDACAPITAL REGIONAL DISTRICTSOOKE & ELECTORAL AREA PARKS AND RECREATION

COMMISSIONBoardroom, SEAPARC Leisure

ComplexWednesday, February 1, 2012

at 6:30 p.m.

Public Welcome to AttendFor meeting confi rmation or for

further information, please contact the SEAPARC Leisure Complex at 642-8000

For meeting agendas and minutes, visit http://www.crd.

bc.ca/agendas

• Staff Reports

• Staff News

• Chair’s Report

Page 27: Sooke News M irror

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 www.sookenewsmirror.com SPORTS • 27

While the avid triath-lon crowd in Victoria take the spectacularscenery and conditions almost for granted, therest of the Canadian tri-athlon community nowhas a great excuse to see what we’re miss-ing.

Designed to take fulladvantage of the west-coast beauty of theSooke area - last year more than 500 athletesfrom around the world enjoyed the Subaru Sooke Triathlon.

The race is part ofthe Subaru Western Tri-athlon Series.

Included in the day of racing are a sprint,Olympic and half-Iron events.

The Olympic-dis-tance was showcased on TSN last year. The event featured a $15,000 prize purse and an exciting “chase” formatwhere the pro women were given a head start on the men.

Brent McMahon over-came the 15-minute def-icit to beat Amanda Ste-vens to the line, while Jeff Symonds rounded out the top three.

The Sooke area is just outside of Victoria and features lush evergreen forests, rainforest, pic-turesque coastal scen-ery, rugged cliffs and sandy beaches.

It is a haven for both leisurely and extreme activities including

year-round charterfishing, scuba diving, windsurfing, hiking, zip-lining and surfing.

The race-coursedesign manages to incorporate some ofthe spectacular scen-ery.

The closed bike course heads up thescenic Pacific Marine Circle Route with itsunique coastal commu-nities and ocean views.

In addition to the spectacular scenicPacific Ocean vistas, the course also includesa run on to Whiffin Spit - a narrow one kmtrail where the Pacific Ocean surrounds theathletes on both sides as they run towards a lighthouse.

“This is one of the most beautiful places, and races, on the planet and we want the rest of Canada to see it,” saysLifeSport’s Lance Wat-son.

In addition to all the racing action, the eventalso features a two-day sport and lifestyleexpo, which is held at the official race hotel, the Prestige Oceanfront Resort and Conference Centre.

Information on the Subaru Sooke Triath-lon and Subaru West-ern Triathlon Series is available at www.tri-series.ca

Sooke scenery impresses athletes

Christine Vopel photo

WinnersThe U15 boys soccer team enjoyed a winagainst Peninsula 4-0 on Saturday.U15 soccer players with coach Bob Nex during a break at Saturday’s game atFred Milne Park.

Sooke Subaru Triathlon

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Page 28: Sooke News M irror

28 • FISHING www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

How’sHow’sFishing?Fishing? It’s that time of year

again — Super Bowl Sunday and what bet-ter way than to have a get together with friends and enjoy some fresh seafood and a few cool ones. How about a winter chinook on the BBQ with crabs and prawns?

Fishing can be hit and miss these days but if you can get out on the water there have been some nice catches in the 10-pound range. Working the trailer park near Otter Point in 100 feet of water seems to be working. It’s too bad one can’t go halibut fishing which, in the past, opened on Febru-ary 1. Anglers are hope-ful it will open on March 1 like it did last year.

More and more anglers are giving hali-

but a try and why not the catch is worth it. There is only a few tick-ets left for the upcom-ing halibut seminar to be held on Feb. 18 at Four Points Sheraton in Langford next to Costco. If you are inter-ested in catching a hali-but this seminar should be good for that. There are some good prizes to be had headlined by a raffle for two new high speed Scotty downrig-gers.

All the proceeds for this event are going to the Charters River Interpretive Centre and Hatchery.

Tickets can be pur-chased at Eagle-Eye Outfitters in Sooke.Until next time.

Keep your rod tip up!Kiwi Magic

photo contributed

Hopefully anglers will be able to head out and catch some halibut on March 1, 2012 like this fellow did fishing with Natural High Charters did last March 1 opening day. Traditionally halibut opened on February 1 and closed December 31. How times are changing. Now anglers don’t really know when it’s going to open and when it’s going to close, last year it closed on September 5. Every year the window gets a little smaller.

Halibut closure

Sooke

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Feb 12, 2012

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