post-1995-april Summerville Post - April, 1995

Download post-1995-april Summerville Post - April, 1995

Post on 07-Mar-2016

220 views

Category:

Documents

4 download

DESCRIPTION

Neighborhood news & events

TRANSCRIPT

  • SPRING GENERAL MEETING

    THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995

    7:00 PM

    SANCTUARY, GOOD SHEPHERD CHURCH

    John Sandeford, AIA, will speak on Lynn Drummond Ross Snellings, Chairman of the Augusta HistoricPreservation Commission, will answer questions on

    Summervilles Historic Ordinance

    Volume 19, No. 1 April 1995

    summerville post

    Remember to Pay Your 1995 DuesMembership Form on Inside Back Cover

  • Presidents Report

    The 1994 Tour of Homes was a booming success, and many thanks go toBeverly Howard, Chairperson. The success of our annual Tour of Homes canonly be measured by the involvement of so many volunteers from ourneighborhood association and their obvious willingness to work. Unfortunately,it is not physically possible to list the names of all those who gave so much oftheir time and effort to this event. However, many thanks likewise go to all ofthose who worked so hard.

    The Board for the calendar year 1995 is off and running, and our thanksgo to Robin Krauss, the past President, for her untold hours of hard work andcommitment to our organization. Robins leadership has been exemplary, andthe overall condition of the association is reflected by her efforts.

    On December 19, 1994, the Augusta City Council passed an ordinancedeclaring the Summerville Neighborhood as a historic district. A committee isnow seeking information necessary for SNA to submit guidelines to the HistoricPreservation Commission which would apply to our neighborhood.

    As a matter of general information, there are eight standing committeesas follows: Finance; Neighborhood Enhancement; Education/Outreach;Neighborhood Safety; Land Use/Historic Preservation; Membership; TourAdvisory; and 1995 Tour of Homes. The names of Board members andcommittee members are listed in the Post., An invitation is hereby extendedto any and all members of the Association to serve on the committeeof your choice. The goal of the Board is for these committees to function andoperate through membership involvement.

    The association will celebrate its 20th anniversary in the year 1996, anda committee is being formed for that purpose. We would like for thiscelebration to be as successful as any prior event sponsored by our association.Please contact Karen Klacsmann, Chairperson, to express willingness to servein any capacity.

    The next general meeting is scheduled for 7:00 p.m., April 20, 1995, atthe Church of the Good Shepherd, and all are invited to attend. There will bea slide presentation of architectural features found in our neighborhood and abrief explanation of the effect of the Historic Preservation Ordinance. Theparticipation of all of our neighborhood members is invited.

    Richard Dunstan

  • 1995 BOARD OFFICERS

    J. RICHARD DUNSTAN, President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860-9983NANCY BOWERS,Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-5878TOM SUTHERLAND, Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-3885JIM NORD, Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-8020, 738-3386

    1995 BOARD MEMBERS

    REMER BRINSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860-1110JIM GARVEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-6665MARY HILL GARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 828-8372LINDA JARVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-1850KATHY KING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-4989, 823-6950SUSAN KAUFMANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-0808BARBARA MERIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-4846CHARLES ROWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-8872EILEEN STULB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724-8512ROBIN KRAUSS, Ex Officio Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-8528

    Standing Committee

    Summerville Neighborhood Association

    FINANCE

    Purpose: To oversee the financial responsibilities of theorganization

    CHARLES ROWELL, CHAIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . 650-8872

    JOE POLLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-8234BILLY THOMPSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-0533DAVID BEES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-7363PHIL WAHL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1389TOM SUTHERLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-3885

    EDUCATION/OUTREACH

    Purpose: To educate both the SNA membership and othergroups and organizations about projects, goals, andobjectives.

    JIM GARVEY, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-6665KATHY KING, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . 737-4989, 823-6950BEV FORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-7674MS. SUTHERLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-3885RICK DAVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-6341FREDDIE FLYNT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-1839

    LAND USE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION

    Purpose: To support the majority of the neighbors in mattersof zoning. To act as a liaison with the Planning andZoning Commission. To continually update and revisethe neighborhood plan.

    GRETCHEN SAUNDERS, CHAIR . . . . . . . . . 736-6692REMER BRINSON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860-1110LINDA JARVIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-1850BILL HAMILTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-2602BILL & BARBARA STENSTROM . . . . . . . . . 738-6772ROBIN KRAUSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-8528JEWELL CHILDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-0973MARY LOU GARREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-3692

    1995 TOURTHERESA HOEHN, CHAIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-5001

    MEMBERSHIP

    TRICIA ORUCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1144

    NEIGHBORHOOD ENHANCEMENT

    Purpose: To serve as a liaison, i.e. to report to SummervilleNeighborhood Association Board concerns ofSummerville citizens regarding neighborhoodenhancement. To look for projects that wouldenhance the Summerville Neighborhood, to presentsuch projects to the Board for review. To continue tofollow up on community projects started by the Boardin the past. To insure the maintenance of suchprojects is carried out. To serve as daily eyes and earsfor the Board regarding the neighborhood i.e. forgarbage, zoning, or any other violations, etc.

    BARBARA MERIN, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . 733-4846EILEEN STULB, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724-8512TAMMY BALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-2320JULIA BARRETT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-5577JEAN GARDNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-0351MELANIE LARSON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . work 868-2446KATHY MILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667-8057MARY HUNT MURRAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-1512JAN HUDSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-2140

    NEIGHBORHOOD SAFETY

    Purpose: To monitor pertinent safety issues. To maintainNeighborhood Watch program.

    MARY HILL GARY, CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-5377KAREN BRUKER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-7955JOHN HAYNIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737-8600KAREN KLACSMANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-0677RICK PINNELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 736-9896TRICIE SCHOLER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733-5311

    TOUR ADVISORYLINDA JARVIS, CO-CHAIR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738-1850MARY HILL GARY, CO-CHAIR . . . . . . . . . . . 828-8372

  • Congratulations to Summerville for becoming theCitys third designated historic district, joiningBethlehem and Downtown. Neighbors CARLDRENNAN, PAUL GONZALEZ, and BRYANHALTERMANN serve on the Augusta HistoricPreservation Commission.

    I know we do a lot of complaining about our weirdweather, but where else can we enjoy JapaneseMagnolias in full bloom on Groundhog Day? Besides,our wacky weather fuels zillions of social conversations,thereby coming to the rescue of the tongue-tied. Andwho says we dont get any snow? I pass softly driftedmounds of the pale stuff every day on the way toschool. It covers the clay property along Milledge forweeks just dont inhale too deeply it has a ratherpungent aroma. Were also fortunate that the mildwinter allows a multitude of different blooms to beenjoyed together. Camellia blossoms and nandinaberries are still in place when daffodils, snowdrops,tulips, and hyacinths pop up and plump pansy throwpillows are scattered all over the place. Then thecherries, quinces and redbuds add early color. We makeYankee friends and family quite jealous.

    Be prepared to be impressed big time! Theaccomplishments of neighbors of all ages have been inthe news lately. Lets start with the youngsters this time.MAGGIE BADGER served as a page in the GA Houseand CARL TYSONs design will be the logo for the newRiverwalk Marina. JULIE HANCOCK (Westminster)and JEREMY CRANFORD (Aquinas) are AP Scholarsand AMANDA WILLIAMS earned 2nd place in theRichmond County Math Contest. RACHEL VEAZEYreceived a Students Who Care Scholarship forcommunity service and SUSAN SANDERS and SALLIESHUFORD hold endowed scholarships at Wofford.JULIE MILLER has earned a spot on the UGAPresidential Scholar list. Various deans listsacknowledge our outstanding students, too, includingKATHY KITCHENS (Washington & Lee),SHOSHANNA RABIN (UGA), SUSIE MCCORD(UGA), NORRIS BOARDMAN (UGA), AMYHANCOCK (Vandy), DAY DUNSTAN (Mercer),SCOTT NESBIT (Wake), APRIL MELTON (MCG),SALLIE SHUFORD (Wofford), DAVID OVERSTREET(Wofford), and JOHN CLARK BROWN (Wofford). Wealso have a crop of outstanding athletes. ADAMCRANFORD was a leader at the Kiawah Classic GolfTournament and BLAIR SCURLOCK has earned a golf

    scholarship to the University of Memphis. He wasinstrumental in ARCs Class AAA state championshiplast year. CHARLES DUNSTAN had a great footballseason at Aquinas, JOHN SAVAGE starred in soccerfor Westminster, rower, JENNIFER PULLING qualifiedfor the U.S. Junior World Championship Team, andCLAIRE SERVY played terrific basketball for AC.Photogenic faces showed ISAAC RABIN enjoying thelast game at the old Heaton Stadium, ANSLEY BELL atthe Mardi Gras Ball, CAROLYN USRYs grandsonsJOSH MCRAE and HAVIRD USRY with an 8 pointbuck hunting trophy, and NANCY CAMPBELL as afinalist to become Honorary Cadet Colonel for ARC.TRAVERS PAINE was interviewed about ARCs dresscode (with WILL BADGER and ANDY ALLEN inphoto, too). ELIZABETH GOLDBERG attended ayearbook workshop at Auburn and LAURA LOFTISand CONNOR BLALOCK competed for Aquinas at theregional cheerleading competition. MICHAEL SMITHsphoto appeared in Augusta Magazine as a member ofthe 50th graduating kindergarten class at EDS.

    How can we top that, you ask? Well, the adults (Ididnt want to say oldsters, youll notice) are achieversas well. LISA KRISHER was nominated for judge ofSuperior Court, RICK ALLEN was nominated for 1994Small Business Person of the Year (and is just aboutfinished building the new baseball stadium), andMARGARET DUNSTAN became DevelopmentDirector for Aquinas. JACK CONNELL served aschairman of our Legislative Delegation, JENNIFERGARVEY BERGER was named STAR teacher at DFA,and NANCY MILLS (a Best of AGS recipient) nowdirects St. Pauls Center for Christian Spirituality (Shewas also mentioned as an eminent artist in AugustaMagazine.) CHARLES CALHOUN was elected to theExchange Club board, JOEL SOBEL was asked to serveon the board of Historic Hotels of America and talkedto the Chronicle about a turn-of-the-century keyrecently returned to the hotel), and BILL STENSTROMreceived the Lifetime Achievement Award from theAssociation of Medical Illustrators. Drs. JAMESBENNETT and JOE GREEN shared honors as co-recipients of Pediatrician of the Year Award and Dr.BENNETT was also featured in an article about MCGsmentor program. JULIA FOLEY MORGAN, who grewup on Henry Street, starred in The Nutcracker andACs JIM KELSON was named Coach of the Year.Summerville has worked with JIM BLOUNT through

    Neighborly News

  • the City Trees and Parks Department. He was namedOutstanding Individual in Georgia for promoting urbanforestry. He and BARRY SMITH (CONs brother)deserve a lot of credit for the many new plantings andmaintenance of neighborhood trees. VENDIE HOOKSand WHATLEY BUSH (ELISE and BILL WESTONsson-in-law) are involved as civilians. RODDYKITCHENS participated in the Heart Ball whichhonored his partner, Dr. ZUMBRO. SHEILA STAHLwas profiled as an Unsung Hero as Victims AssistanceProgram coordinator and LINDA CARPENTER washighlighted in the RC Chronicle. Dr. CAROL PRYORwas quoted in an article about AAUWs 75thAnniversary and NANCY BOWERS has been involvedwith the assessment of Main Street Augusta. (Werenow a Main Street Georgia city.) PAUL GONZALEZhosted the state convention of the American ArchitectsInstitute and his wife CAROLINE DI DONATO -GONZALEZ worked on the Jr. League Attic Sale (Hersmiling face was shot for the Chronicle.) FRANNBENNETT and BILL TOOLE were praised In theSpotlight of Sacred Heartsounds. WALTALEXANDERSON received a similar honor in theSymphony newsletter, then smiled for the Spirit andappeared on TV12 with an Eagle Scout he sponsored.JAN STUNTZ described Christmas decorations for theChronicle, MONTY OSTEEN unveiled AGSTomorrows vision of downtown and became a sponsorfor the Golf Hall of Fame, TODD SCHULTZ presenteda Benchmarking speech and workshops, and GARYSTROEBEL made a presentation in CT. ANDYJORDAN helped HELEN HENDEE distributeChristmas bikes through DFACS. MIKE GARRETT wasprofiled as an outstanding defense lawyer and FRANTEDESCO described MCGs progress. RABBI andMRS. MAYNARD HYMAN were interviewed aboutRosh Hashana, Hanukkah, and bar Mitzvahs. MIKESHLAER was informative about PHOs. BRYANHALTERMANN and ED RICE (Best of AGSrecipient) talked about local art collections, CHRISBOWLES discussed our housing market, and KEITHCLAUSSEN continued to be instrumental in guiding theMorris Museum (which received the 1994 -95 RegionalDesignation Award in the Humanities part of theCultural Olympiad). RANDY SMITH contributed hisplastic surgery expertise to a young Salvadoran burnvictim. Another good Samaritan, MARGARETLOFVING found a lost wallet while on her daily walkand tracked down the Ft. Gordon owner. PHILIPGOLDBERG is designing a drainage system for theHyde Park Neighborhood and provides numerous

    recycling opportunities. Artists SUSAN JOHNSTONand DONNA WHALEY produced an art exhibition withLALA MULHERN STREET at La Maison. The studiosof RANDY LAMBETH and BRIAN RUST (whosesculptures are becoming well known) were open for the95 GAAC Artist Studio Tour. The local real estatemarket really benefits from the expertise of awardwinners GWEN FULCHER YOUNG, TONYMULHERIN, DAVID MORETZ, CARRIE GARRETT,JANA CHILDS, LINDA JARVIS, JULIE BLALOCK,MARIE NEEL, LEE NEEL (who also appears frequentlyin photos and interviews regarding the RC Commissionand is a Best of Augusta recipient) GAIL STEVES,and ANN MARIE MCMANUS (her dad, NOELSCWEERS received recognition for 40 years of realestate service). Caught saying cheese for various newscameras were SUSAN SHAVER and her pig,PETUNIA, EVELYN LEONARD, CARRIE AMACHER,ELISE WESTON, NANCY THOMPSON, MARSHADOHRMAN, DEL SMITH, KATHY KING, DONNAWHALEY, THERESA HOEHN, LUTHER MILLS,CAROLYN USRY, CAROLYN and RUSTY BAILIE(then and now), SENATOR CHARLES WALKER(soon to be a Monte Sano neighbor), DUDLEYBOWEN, Smoaks STEVE and MARGARET PIERCE,ACs HENRY THOMAS, DONN DUTEAU, BOBYOUNG (a best of AGS recipient), Dr. BENNETT(with his orchids this time), art collectors FREDDIEFLYNT and MIKE, MARSHA, and TESS SHLAER,ROBIN ZETTERBURG, FRAN TEDESCO, FRED FOYSTRANG (Reid Memorial), GLORIA NORWOOD (ParkAvenue Fabrics and Rep. Charlies wife), ROBERTFAIN and DAN BROWN (showing Good Shepherdspartnership with Elim Baptist Church), PETE KNOXsdad PETE, JOE NEALs son JOE (who was lostovernight in Colorado), ED CASHIN (BOBs historyexpert brother and Best of AGS recipient), JANICEWILLIAMS (AC art professor who directed the mural onFifth Street and is a Best of Augusta recipient), andTrinitys CINDY WILKERSON (an Unsung Hero alsofeatured in Sacred Heartsounds). The most visible publicservants were ACs president BILL BLOODWORTH(riding a hot air balloon on A Day for AugustaCollege, discussing restoration of the guardhouse withSNA, suggesting reading matter, planning to attend the58th Joint Civilian Orientation Conference to tourbases from each branch of the military, and beingFocussed on the Future of AC), MAYOR CHARLESDEVANEY (a Best of Augusta recipient, delegate tothe first White House Conference on Travel andTourism, and working toward the canal as a heritage

  • corridor), and TOM ROBERTSON (chairman of theCanal Authority, working to establish the CanalNational Heritage Corridor, nominated to the board ofthe National Coalition for Heritage Areas, and programpresenter at the winter meeting of the GA HistoricalSociety.

    Many Best of Augusta designations were earnedby Summerville people, places, and businesses. A fewhave already been mentioned in this column, but hereare the rest of the Best: GABBY BOARDMAN,TRAV PAINE, BILL TEMPLETON, HUDSONTEMPLETON, PARTRIDGE INN, VILLAGE DELI,BASKIN-ROBBINS, DQ, PIZZA HUT, SMOAKS,MAGNOLIA BOOKSHOP (reprinted the 1894Artwork of Augusta) READY TO WEAR AGAIN,BAILIES, DANIEL VILLAGE BARBERSHOP,DURDENS BARBERSHOP, FAT MANs, VERA &CO., ALL THAT JAZZ (at P.I.), Walton Way, and HenryStreet. Bravo!

    Kudos go to other well known businesses either inSummerville, or owned by Summervillians (not villains!)or their families and featured in AGS Magazine theChronicle and Spirit: LAURIE MCRAE INTERIORS,DORIS DIAMONDS, SUMMERVILLE RAGS, DOTHOLLANDS PERSNICKETY, MICHAEL OBYRNEPHOTOGRAPHY, PARK AVENUE FABRICS,BOWLES CONSTRUCTION, BRETTS TRANSFER,TIM CONWAY PHOTOGRAPHY, LE CAF DUTEAU, THE SPOTTED COW, KINGS WAYGALLERY, THE FRAME SHOPPE, AGS ART GLASSAND KITCHEN TUNE-UP (DEREK SNEAD).PHILIPPEs helps the Soup Kitchen by participating inthe Taste of the Harvest, employees at JONESINTERCABLE help local charities, and SQUEAKYshas an on-going spring fund-raiser to help fulfill thewishes of terminally ill children and teens.

    WEATHERs FLORIST is celebrating its 35thanniversary, ROBIN KRAUSS GARDEN MAGICmoved to Surrey and DRAKE WHITE AND CHRISHOWERDD started PHORUM, a marketing firm.PAULS PLACE (FAULKNER WARLICKs restaurantand the PI (CHEF JEFF JACOBSEN) received ratingsamong the highest determined by the RC HealthDepartment. GREEN THUMB CENTRAL, GARDENMAGIC, FAT MANS, WEATHERS and BILLTEMPLETON participated in the beautiful 1995 SacredHeart Garden and Flower Show.

    Eight of our fabulous houses have been featuredrecently in Todays Home. Included as finished (or as

    finished as our homes ever get) were those of SARAHDIENST, KAREN, MARK, SLOAN, and ALLISONCLEARY (now theyre looking around to start over what gluttons for punishment!), GWEN and BOBYOUNG, LARRY and MARY HUNT MURRAY (Thekitchen was also in AGS Magazine as a gatheringplace), FRANCES and DONNA WHALEY (built by hergrandfather in 1929), and STEVE and MARYXENAKIS who have been restationed here so newlypromoted Brigadier General STEVE can direct theTricare Program at Eisenhower. Homes highlighted asseeing the light at the end of a tunnel projectsincluded those of ALAN and TINA WHITEHOUSE andCARLISLE, SHARA, BAKER, and JIM OVERSTREET(built by Joseph Cumming in 1922.) RODGER GILESsolarium was spotlighted in jobs well done, folks.

    AGS Magazines Places in the Sun article (Just asmall world Note Rodge, Walt, and I were neighborsin Valley Park 26 years ago.)

    A new baby boom is in progress, especially onMcDowell. STEPHANIE, WILL, and TREVORHUGGINS welcomed HAILIE MARYANNA, RICK andCATHERINE RYAN are busy with twins KATHERINEVERDERY and HANNAH MIKELL (proudgrandparents are PETE and CORNELIA VERDERY);MARCI and GLENN CANNON are enjoying daughterANSLEE BROOK; and COREY PULLIAM has a newsister, ELYSE FRANCES, born to RUTH and ODONWILSON. There are two more babies due by mid -summer! Elsewhere in the vicinity, ANN, JIM, andSIENNA NEELY have baby RAVEN to play with andANN MARIE, GENE, MAUREEN, and MACMCMANUS are delighted with baby CAROLINE. Thestork has made Summerville a regular stop on his route.CARRIE LEE KINLAW and TODD SCHULTZ have hadtheir own personal population explosion by adoptingdaughters, TERI, APRIL and HOPE. Congratulations toall!

    Besides babies and other children, newcomers arearriving continuously. Welcome to LISA ATKINS(Central), LIBBY CANADA (Milledge), BOB and KIMBOGART (Wrightsboro), THERESA SHIRLEY (Heard),CLAUDIA GAUGHF and JAY COCHRAN (McDowell),SUSAN and JANE HOUSTON (Meigs), the JONESfamily, POPE, GAIL, WILEY, JOHN POPE and ABBY(Kings Way) and MICKEY, NANCY and BILLCAMPBELL (Bellvue). Within the neighborhood, JOHNand ANN OVERSTREET will relocate from MagnoliaVilla to Montrose Court and the BILLY LYNN familywill move from Hickman to Gardner. Were expecting

  • some new arrivals in the near future as construction andrenovation projects move forward: the GREAR family,JESSE, DEBRA, MELISA, CHARLIE, STEPHANIEand JEFFREY, will head for Gardner, LINDA andSTEVE BRETT are moving; the GIBBS family, BILL,MILLA, DAVID and JACK, will move into ALLEN andKEN ROPERs former Anthony Road home; theLONGs, JACK, BENITA, JACK and SALLIE, areworking on the Pickens Road home recently sold byCHRIS ELMS; Senator and Mrs. CHARLES WALKERand Dr. and Mrs. HATNEY will reside in new homes onMonte Sano.

    Well bid fond farewells to the LOFTIS family,(Gardner), the WALKERS, CHRISTIE, BRITT, andHARRISON, (on Walton Way); MARY SVEDRES(Central); SCOTT ALLEN (Milledge), the RIVERSfamily, GARY; JOHN SCHAEFFER (Walton Way) andthe POWELLS (Monte Sano).

    A FEW NOTES OF GENERAL INTEREST

    The GA Historical Societys winter meeting includeda tour of Summerville

    There have been some robberies of front porchfurniture

    ARCs JROTC program was named an Honor Unitwith Distinction (which places it among the top 10%nationally).

    Keep an eye on the property on Highland betweenCentral and McDowell. Demolition permits havealready been issued.

    If you would like information about Collage: CreativeArts Camp, sponsored by the Friends of theSymphony, for elementary age children (July 10 -21), call me (738-7527).

    Sue

    1996 marks the 20th year of theSummerville Neighborhood Association

    We are in the planning stages of making 1996 a year-longcelebration of our neighborhood. We need your input and ideas.

    If you are a long-time resident of Summerville, wed like to hearabout past traditions, see any old photos, record your reminiscing.

    If youre new to our neighborhood, wed like your ideas onevents that can be enjoyed by all of us.

    Please call Karen Klacsmann, 736-0677with your suggestions and ideas.

    The Neighborhood Safety Committee

    The neighborhood Safety Committees goals for this year include increasing the coverage of theNeighborhood Watch, building a closer relationship with the police department and alerting themembers about pertinent safety issues in the neighborhood. (We are looking for watch block captains.Call if you are interested.) We want to hear from you about any safety concerns in the neighborhood.Please let us know when something is happening (vandalism, burglary or nuisances) on your street. Wewant to help by supporting you.

  • As I understand it, the history of the AugustaCollege campus begins with peaches.

    It was peaches that impressed Captain MatthewPayne, U.S. Army, in the fall of 1820 as herecuperated from the ravages of a fever that hadkilled all 30 enlisted men at the Augusta Arsenal onthe Savannah River. Payne, commander of thearsenal, was nursed back to health at Bellevue, thefamily home of Freeman Walker, up in the SandHills some 300 feet above and several milessouthwest of the river valley where the arsenal hadbegun its operations the year before. Payne wasdelighted by the taste of peaches grown on theWalker property and also by its dry air and goodwater.

    In fact, Payne told his Army superiors that theBellevue land was a far better place than the riverfor an arsenal, and he recommended that thegovernment buy a 72-acre section from the Walkerfamily to establish the arsenal there, adjacent to theVillage of Summerville. In 1826 an Act ofCongress authorized the purchase.

    Learning that the Federal government plannedto build a new arsenal off the Walker land, 38residents of Summerville signed a petitionopposing the plan. An arsenal, they claimed, woulddisturb the privacy, security and tranquility oftheir village. Moreover, they claimed that theywould be more or less menaced by theneighborhood of soldiers, however strict theirdiscipline.

    The residents of Summerville did not prevail,however, and the new arsenal was established onthe plank road eventually known as Walton Way.Buildings a the old arsenal site on the river weredismantled and moved to the Walker tract. Thenew site was cooler, dryer and less susceptible todisease. These were the same reasons people hadchosen to buy land and build homes inSummerville. For the government, the AugustaArsenal in Summerville was an especially goodplace, far superior to Charleston, for the storage ofpowder and munitions.

    The original fears of the residents wereoccasionally justified in the years that followed. In1838, for instance, the commander of the arsenalnoted the prevalent and beastly state ofintoxication among enlisted men and found it

    necessary to confine those found drunk anddisorderly in a windowless dungeon beneath whatis now Payne Hall at Augusta College.

    As the years passed, however, the arsenal and itscivilian neighbors generally found themselves in astate of peaceful coexistence. The dungeonprobably helped. According to Helen CallahansSummerville: A Pictorial History, manyneighbors handed down pleasant memories ofsocial events and military ceremonies at thearsenal.

    Memory often softens the past. Certainly theproducts of the arsenal were incongruous withSummerville. Ruby Mabry McCrary Pfadenhauer,official historian of the Augusta Arsenal (and still aSummerville resident), has noted that the earlyyears of the arsenal produced such material ascannons, caissons, powder boxes, ammunition forsmall arms, horse shoes, fuses, and artilleryprojectiles. At one point, 12,000 pounds ofpowder were in storage where peaches once grew.Later, using a foundry, a large machine shop, anickel plating plant, and quantities of explosives,the arsenal manufactured large projectiles andother arms of war. During World War II it repairedmachine guns on tanks, coated small arms withgrease for shipment to the front lines, and providedother ordinance work in various technical shops. Asignificant part of the industrial effort that led tovictory in 1945 took place on Walton Way.

    In 1955 the arsenal was closed, having served itsnation (two nations, actually, since it wassurrendered to the Confederate States in 1861)from the Seminole War of 1835 to Korea. But itsclosing as a military post only opened the way fora long-cherished dream of a four-year college inAugusta. With the arsenal gone, Summervillebecame the field of that dream.

    In 1957 most of the arsenal property wastransferred to the Richmond County Board ofEducation for use by the Junior College of Augusta,which has until that time been housed in RichmondAcademy. More of the property followed. A monthafter the initial acquisition of arsenal land, StateSenator Carl Sanders said, We are going to havea four-year college in Augusta as a matter of time.In 1958 the Junior College of Augusta, with anenrollment of 431 students, was accepted into the

    From Peaches to ProfessorsWilliam Bloodworth

    PresidentAugusta College

  • University System of Georgia, at which point itbecame Augusta College. Five years later, with CarlSanders now Governor, it was made a four-yearcollege. In 1967 its first baccalaureate degreeswere granted to 181 men and women.

    TODAY the property that once grew FreemanWalkers peaches, stored Uncle Sams powder, andproduced guns to fight Hitler serves as the maincampus of a college with almost 6,000 studentsper term.

    For almost thirty-eight years now, the FreemanWalker tract at 2500 Walton Way has beendevoted to the shaping of human talent. From leadand brass and explosives, it has turned toknowledge, art, and human values. It is a place ofclasses, workshops, exhibits, performances, andstudy. It is a place in partial fulfillment, it wouldseem, of Isaiahs prophecy: Nation shall not lift upsword against nation, neither shall they learn warany more.

    There are soldiers again on the property becausethe college maintains an Army ROTC program.But it is primarily a place of students. Formerpresident George A. Christenberry tells me thatAugusta College students have on occasionbehaved as college students are want to do withthe streaking craze of the 1970s most vividly inmind, I suppose. For the most part, however, ourstudents today are serious, diverse, and interestedprimarily in their education.

    There are, of course, a lot of them. In a yearstime we serve over 8,000 individual students. Andwe have a least that many registrations for non-credit continuing education course. Our studentscome primarily from the Augusta metropolitanarea, although 35 states and 23 countries nowcontribute to the student body. Sixty-three percentof our students are women. Over eighteen percentare African Americans. The average age of anAugusta c college undergraduate is 26, the median22. They pursue over 50 programs of study at theassociate, baccalaureate, masters, and educationspecialist levels.

    But the geography they occupy on Walton Wayis virtually the same size it was in 1829 when a fewdozen soldiers of Company C of the SecondArtillery first occupies the new arsenal. For thisreason, the most notable trait of Augusta Collegestudents (especially from a neighborhoodperspective) is that none of them live on campus.

    Yet they are still influenced by the neighborhood.One of the distinctive features of the college is itslocation: in historic buildings dating from the

    beginning of the Augusta Arsenal, and in aresidential neighborhood. The character ofSummerville, including its respect for the materialcreations of the past and for neighbors, adds to thecharacter of the college. I like to speak of AugustaCollege as Augustas college to emphasize its tiesto the larger community. But I know that it is alsoAugustas college in Summerville.

    IN THE RECENT PAST I know that theResidents of Summerville have been concernedabout certain developments at the college. Youhave a right, as neighbors, to be concerned, as didthose residents in 1826 who believed the arsenalwould threaten their privacy, security andtranquility. In 1980 you raised a cry of alarmwhen the college sought to remove the 1890sguardhouse at the corner of Walton Way andKatherine Street. In 1990 and 1991, I know, manyof you expressed displeasure over a campus masterplan that called for eventually housing twothousand students on the campus. In the past yearI have heard personally from several of you ion thetopics of parking and landscape. In the future Ihope that I or whoever serves the college as itspresident will continue to hear, and heed, theconcerns of neighbors.

    Today Augusta College is seeking to become thebest possible college of its kind. Of its kind meansmetropolitan-based, community-oriented, andcommuter-served. We are a non-residential college.Our master plan for facilities, updated last May, nolong includes dormitories to house students oncampus. We will continue, of course, to serve awide variety of students who choose to move toAugusta, but we now have no plans to built oroperate student residences on Walton Way. )Andyou should know that the College Stationapartments on Wrightsboro Road are neitherowned nor operated by the college or itsfoundation.)

    But we do plan to grow. This means planning forgrowth. Last May when we updated the masterplan, we also considered where to put our newscience building. A dozen possible locations wereevaluated. We were assisted in this work by thepresence and useful opinions of the president ofthe Summerville Neighborhood Association. Thefinal selection of site for the building took intoconsideration a variety of factors, includingparking, pedestrian movement on campus, and theappearance of the back side of the campusfacing McDowell Street.

    As now planned, the science building to be thelargest building on campus will be constructed in

  • Calendar of EventsNEXT BOARD MEETING April 20, 1995

    GENERAL MEETINGS

    April 20, 1995July 20, 1995

    October 19, 1995

    SUMMERVILLE PICNIC July 20, 1995 6:00 p.m.

    1995 SUMMERVILLE TOUR OF HOMES

    October 13, 14, and 15, 1995

    ALSO, REMEMBER!

    THE COTTON BALL MAY 13, 1995

    WALKING TOUR OF SUMMERVILLE(Register with Augusta College Continuing Education)

    MAY 14, 1995

    the area between the swimming pool and the watertower. It will close off access to Monte Sano andallow us to develop the central part of campus as apedestrian-only green space. As needed, we willdevelop additional ground parking around our oldbaseball field, which will remain as a grass for atleast the next several years. And we will continueto explore all possible means for accommodating alarge and growing institution of higher educationon 78 acres of Summerville property.

    The science building is close to approval by thestate legislature. Other plans are further fromrealization. We hope someday to replace ourconverted ware houses (our six academic buildings)with new multi-story structures designed for theclassroom and office uses to which they will be put,at a considerable savings in ground space. Ourstudent government leaders are now consideringthe possibility of a special fee to fund a studentactivity center. We would like to build a newcontinuing education center at an off-campus site,again at a savings in ground area on the FreemanWalker tract.

    In all of this and in other planning efforts, wewould enjoy and benefit from the advice andassistance of our Summerville neighbors. We need,in particular, to plan carefully for parking, drainage,trees, and landscape. I am eager to develop plans

    to improve and extend the park-like perimeters ofthe campus even though I know that this kind ofplanning requires special expertise andconsiderable expense.

    Since the college has a large proportion ofhistoric buildings, our operations must also includehistoric preservation. This fact is a constantchallenge because historic preservation has littlerole in the distribution of state funds to the college.

    ON NOVEMBER 11 of next year, theSummerville Neighborhood Association willcelebrate its twenty-fifth anniversary. At that timeAugusta College will have been a Summervilleinstitution for slightly more than thirty-nine years(following, of,course, the long history of the arsenalin Summerville). As president of the college, I hopethat the Associations birthday will be an occasiononce again to celebrate our relationship asneighbors together. We do this well and brightly,of course, at our joint lighting of the holiday tree oncampus every December. From my perspective, aneven brighter relationship would includecooperative planning for an ever more attractivecampus, continually good communications, and possibly even a Summerville museum somewhereon the old Freeman Walker tract.

    Too bad we cant have peaches, too.

  • Summerville Neighborhood Association

    1995 MEMBERSHIP/DUES FORM

    Dues Paid: _____Individual $5.00Family $10.00Senior Citizen $3.00

    SNA dues payments are a tax deductible contribution.Membership Year runs January 1 - December 31

    Last Name (or Organization): ____________________________________________

    Member(s) First Names: ____________________________________________

    _______________________________________________________________

    Please make checks payable toThe Summerville Neighborhood Association

    I want to volunteer for

    Tour ______________________________________________________________

    Committee__________________________________________________________

    Phone Tree ________________________________________________________

    Other ______________________________________________________________

    For New Members of to Update Information

    House # ______ Street Name ________________________ Apt./Box # ______

    City, State, Zip ________________________________________________________

    Home Phone ________________________ Work Phone _____________________

    Please give form and payment to a SNA board member or mail to

    Summerville Neighborhood Association P.O. Box 12212 Augusta, GA 30904

  • Non-ProfitOrganizationU.S. Postage

    PAIDAugusta, GA

    Bulk Permit #111

    Summerville Neighborhood AssociationP.O. Box 12212Augusta, GA 30904

    We Want You!to submit your great ideas for

    the Gala 20th Year Anniversary Celebration ofthe Summerville Neighborhood Association.Categories include, but are not limited to

    ideas for families, children, art, athletics, academics,history, schools, house and garden, and of course a theme.

    Prizes will be given.Winners will be announced in

    the Fall, 1995 issue of the Summerville Post.Ideas must be submitted in writing by May 15, 1995. Mail to:

    The Summerville Neighborhood AssociationBox 12212, Augusta, Georgia 30904

    or Fax to: 733-7461