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GUIDE TO STUDIO ACCESSORIES HOW TO TURN EVERY ENQUIRY INTO A SALE WACOM INTUOS5 TABLET ON TEST WHY CAPTURING EXPRESSIONS IS A WEDDING GOLD MINE WHY ONE HEAD IS BETTER THAN TWO Location lighting made surprisingly easy ISSUE 80 £4.50 www.photopromagazine.com Follower of fashion Enjoy the outrageous Photoshop-fuelled world of John Farrar PRO PORTFOLIO Unmissable tips for getting your images in print HOW TO GET PUBLISHED THE PERFECT BACK-UP CAMERA? Low price, high spec Nikon D7100 tested Expert advice to help you print and sell your finest work FINE ART MAKE MORE MONEY FROM BRILLIANT SENNHEISER ACCESSORIES WORTH £500! WIN

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Issue 80 of Photo Professional Magazine

TRANSCRIPT

  • guide to studio accessories

    how to turn every enquiry into a sale

    wacom intuos5 tablet on test

    guide to studio

    why capturing expressions is a wedding gold mine

    why one head is better than two Location lighting made surprisingly easy

    issue 80 4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

    Follower of fashionEnjoy the outrageous Photoshop-fuelled world of John Farrar

    Follower pro portfolio

    Unmissable tips for getting your images in printUnmissable tips for getting

    How to get publisHed

    the perfect back-up camera?Low price, high spec Nikon D7100 tested

    expert advice to help you print and sell your finest work expert advice to help you print and sell your finest work FiNe ARtFiNe ARt ARt ARMAKe MoRe MoNeY FRoM

    the perfect back-up camera?Low price, high spec Nikon D7100 tested

    brilliant sennheiser accessories worth 500!win

  • 004 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    CONTENTSISSUE 80

    Business MattersPro Academy Gear

    Regulars

    032 SElliNg SmilES Forced smiles and clichd poses dont sell photos. Genuine emotions and real expressions do, so master the art of capturing them to guarantee good sales.

    038 TravElliNg lighT COVER Damien Lovegrove explains how he packs all his kit into hand luggage and demonstrates his one-head approach to lighting fashion portraits on location.

    044 fiNE arT fiNESSE Youre making the move into selling your images to collectors, but are your prints making the right impression? Choose the best media for your images and youll soon be producing prints with impact.

    082 NikON d7100 COVER If you think this latest launch sounds like a minor upgrade to the companys D7000, think again. Its actually Nikons flagship DX DSLR, but does it wow our reviewer?

    090 waCOm iNTuOS 5COVER If you eschew the modest mouse and take fine control of your editing with a pen and tablet, you might want to try this pro level but well-priced offering from Wacom.

    092 buyErS guidE COVER Studio accessories they can make or break a shoot, so make sure the ones you invest in add value.

    055 buSiNESS maTTErSHot tips and expert advice to help you position, market and run your business so it stays in the black.

    058 iTS a TEam gamE Dont fly solo. Collaborating with other professionals will improve your shoot and leave your portfolio bulging.

    064 SigNEd & SEalEd COVER Getting a prospective client to sign on the dotted line is key to making the sale. So how do you do it?

    068 makiNg iT pay COVER Theres probably no tougher market than fine art. Six photographers tell us how they turn a profit from it.

    006 iNbOX Light up your photography life with news of the latest product launches, winners (there are no losers) and competitions.

    016 pOrTfOliO: JOhN farrarCOVER Believing in the one killer shot, John Farrar strives for absolute perfection all the time. He hits that mark with every one of his striking beauty images.

    016

    SUBSCRIBE & SAVE 50% 13 ISSUES FOR JUST 29 - see p78 for our special offer

    Discover powerful but portable alternatives to a speedlight when on location

    038

    022 prOJECT: dOiNg TimE COVER Commercial photographer Adam Hinton doesnt often get nervous, but he does admit to an anxious moment when shooting in a gang-run El Salvadorian jail.

    022

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 005

    Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge, CB22 3HJ.

    No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

    Cant find a copy? Finding your nearest Photo Professional magazine stockist couldnt be easier. Simply contact: COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QE Alternatively call 01895 433600.

    When you have finished with this magazine, please recycle it

    Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ Telephone 01223 499450 [email protected] www.photopromagazine.comeditorialEditor Terry Hope 01959 563007 [email protected] Writer Ian Fyfe 01223 499456 [email protected] Editors Lisa Clatworthy 01223 499450 Hannah Bealey 01223 499450Editorial Director Roger Payne 01223 499460 [email protected] Director Dean UsherDesign & Production Manager Grant GillardadvertisingSales Director Matt Snow 01223 499453 [email protected] Accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 [email protected] Elliott 01223 499458 [email protected] Development Director Dave Stone 01223 499462 [email protected] advertising copy to: [email protected] Directors Andy Brogden & Matt PluckHead of Circulation Chris Haslum

    068

    Cover image John Farrar

    SUBSCRIBE & SAVE 50% 13 ISSUES FOR JUST 29 - see p78 for our special offer

    082

  • PORTFOLIO | JOHN FARRAR

    016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the approach of others and made sure he did

    something completely different. The result is a highly original style of photography where

    nothing is quite what it seemsWORDS EMMA MESTON PICTURES JOHN FARRAR

    KeepQui

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the

    QuiJohn Farrar took a long hard look at the

    eepQui

    eeprky

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the

    kyJohn Farrar took a long hard look at the

    eepky

    eeprkyr it

  • PORTFOLIO | JOHN FARRAR

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 017

  • PP80.indd 1 19/4/13 11:29:17

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 031

    038 travelling lightExpert advice from Damien Lovegrove on lighting location fashion with one head.

    pro academyProviding you with the essential skills, techniques and ideas you need to make it as a successful professional photographer

    EssEntial pro sEcrEts

    rEvEalEd

    032 selling smiles Top tips and helpful hints to capture the genuine happiness on the big day that

    will guarantee you good sales.

    044 prints with impactFind out what media is available and how to create fine art prints that sell.

  • pro academy

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    pro academy

    ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    P O S I N G W E D D I N G S

    Genuine, happy expressions are what sell wedding pictures and yet its so easy to come away with results that look stiff and staged. Margaret

    Soraya reveals how she achieves a more natural approachWORDS & PICTURES MARGARET SORAYA

    eXpreSSIoNall IN the

    hen I look at any image, what makes it come alive for me is just one thing: expression. It appears that others agree, because most of the couples who book me to photograph their

    wedding say that the main reason they chose me is the natural and unposed feel of my work.

    Real expressions, eyes that light up with smiles, genuine moments between couples, funny moments with children

    these are the things that produce reactions within us. Have you noticed how when looking at some images, you find yourself smiling without thinking? Its simply a natural and emotional response. Heres a look at some of the ways I manage to achieve this style throughout my work.

    WMAIN IMAGE

    Reportage-style photography is becoming ever

    more popular and the key to this is staging

    your subjects in a natural manner.

    Candid style Laughter I never relax at a wedding. Often people come up and talk to me during the downtime at weddings, which is lovely, but one half of me is talking while the other half is constantly listening out for the sound of laughter. If you hear laughter, you usually have a great image just waiting to be shot. You have to be fast, find the laughter, lift the camera and shoot before the moment is gone. A longer lens is usually what you need for a scenario of this kind.

    Bridesmaids together before the wedding can be a source of laughter and fun, while speeches are another time to capture some fantastic and natural expressions.

    MomentsMoments happen at weddings everywhere, and usually discreetly. Ever known a bride and her dad to stop and pose for the camera whilst having a genuine and affectionate moment? You need to be aware of these things and to be prepared for when they might happen. Things to look out for include dad seeing his daughter ready to be married, line-ups, the groom seeing his bride for the first time and couples as theyre walking down the aisle, happy and relieved that theyre together.

    Children At weddings, I usually take the approach of playing with children, setting up games of hide and seek behind my camera, throwing balloons and asking them to twirl. Their natural smiles will appear and, with a bit of effort, so will some lovely images. Candid styles work well with children as well. Watch them, follow them and shoot a lot because children move fast!

    more INformatIoNwww.sorayaphoto.com

  • PP80.indd 1 19/4/13 12:01:38

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 055

    n my albeit fairly biased opinion, copyright law should be essential training for everyone involved in creative industries, not just

    photographers. I came across a case in point just this month.

    One of my clients is a tattoo artist who occasionally applies his inky talents to celebrity skin. He recently tattooed a member of an internationally successful boy band (sorry for being vague but the case hasnt been settled yet and names cant be revealed in case a confidentiality agreement is required). Spotting this as a promotional opportunity my client took a photo of the clean-cut young singer showing off his body art. The tattooist then added a large watermark across the image before uploading it to his social media accounts. Within days the picture had appeared all over the place without any permission or payment.

    My clients photo appears to have been lifted by various different sources, one of whom crudely cloned out the watermark. This has effectively degraded the quality of the tattoo making it look smudged. As a result my client has lost business and I am helping him to settle his claims.

    In the UK the law automatically protects the rights of photographers as authors of original works. However, enforcing these rights is left to the author. So, over the next three columns, I am going to explain how to protect image rights and exploit them for commercial gain.

    So, what rights are protected? If you take a photograph, the basic principle is that you are the author of that image and the copyright rests with you. This means that others are

    prevented from doing all manner of things, including copying the image, issuing copies of it, circulating it, adapting it, and using it without your permission.

    Ive lost track of the number of people Ive met who think that because an image is on the Internet they can use it for free, even for commercial gain. Even if people know its illegal, theres no moral stigma attached to nicking an image online. There is a flipside to this widespread copyright theft if you catch someone stealing your image the law is entirely on your side.

    If you find that someones used your image without permission, the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 means you may be entitled to damages in the form of a cash settlement, or you could be entitled to any profit the thief made from your work. You may also be granted an injunction to stop them using your image again, or they may have to return all your images if they have printed them up, or used them in products, such as T-shirts for example. You do not need to register your copyright to have the benefit of these rights; they are available to you immediately, simply by virtue of being the person who pressed the shutter.

    Next month Ill run through steps to take to prevent people from stealing your images and then follow up with how to exploit your rights for financial gain.

    n Scott Gair is an intellectual property lawyer at Mayo Wynne Baxter and a professional photographer. Send your questions for this column to [email protected]

    earch engine optimisation (SEO) is something many professional photographers assume is too difficult or technical to do for

    themselves, but the simple truth is anyone can do enough SEO to make a big difference to their business. Before you actually begin the task of finding the right keywords to help your clients find a photographer, you should seriously consider the SEO strategies you plan to use and have some idea of what your SEO plan should achieve for you.

    With your goals in mind, you can now get more specific with your photography keywords choice. The more targeted you can make this, the better things will be in the long

    BUSINESS MATTERS

    058 BEcoME A TEAM plAyERCollaborate to boost your business

    064 cloSINg ThE wEddINg dEAlTurn prospects into firm bookings

    ScoTT gAIR, INTEllEcTUAl pRopERTy lAwyERTattoos, boy bands and image rights

    NIgEl MERRIck, phoTogRAphER ANd BUSINESS wRITERStay on top of SEO

    056 why yoUR BUSINESS NAME IS IMpoRTANT068 SpEcIAl REpoRT: how To MAkE fINE ART pAy

    If you take a photo, you are the author of that image and the copyright rests with you

    I

    S

  • business matters

    068 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    Financial security and fine art dont always go together but can you stick to your principles and still generate additional or even primary income? We talk to a selection of photographers who have managed exactly that

    Fine artthe Finances oFP R O F I T A B L E F I N E A R T

    WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES VARIOUS

    ine art is one of those areas that can keep hard-working, commercially-minded photographers sane. Its a chance to forget the day job for a

    few blissful hours and to remind yourself why you picked up the camera in the first place. You can chase your dreams and set out to create beautiful images whose main purpose in life is to satisfy your artistic expression and to speak to the souls of those who encounter them.

    Many people who make their living from photography came into the business in the first place because they had a natural talent for seeing the image and capturing something special that so many others miss. They were tempted to see if they could turn that skill into a profession and then reality kicked in, as all the dreary paperwork-related trappings of running a small business followed and an urgent requirement arose to monetise what was once just a carefree hobby.

    Odd moments shooting pictures for yourself are a reminder that photography is still one of the most enjoyable pastimes in the world, but are these private shots necessarily destined for no more than your personal collection? Its tantalising to realise that some photographers have mastered the art of marketing their fine art images, either as a profitable sideline alongside their regular work or as their main source of income. Furthermore, as photography has finally shaken off its shackles as the perceived poorer relation of traditional art, serious collectors and influential galleries have started to take photo-based fine art more seriously. Its now possible to realise very decent sums of money for beautifully thought through and professionally presented works.

    Those who want to move into the world of fine art have to do it in the right way, however. It helps to have a theme to tie the work together, and a clearly considered approach and artistic viewpoint: simply lumping a selection of individual and disparate images together wont impress the serious collector. An artists

    statement is expected; it should consist of a brief biography plus an outline of what you are trying to achieve in your work. Go online and study the statements of other photographic artists to get an idea of whats required.

    You also need to be able to guarantee the archival nature of your work, and it is now possible to offer certificates or an embossment from printer and media companies such as Epson (Digigraphie) to assure potential

    F

    buyers that your work really will last a lifetime. Presentation is also key. A good-quality mount and frame, or a modern presentation technique, such as sealing the print in acetate, can add the final touch, ensuring the image looks as though its worth every penny of its asking price.

    Here then are the experiences of a selection of photographers who have ventured into fine art photography in some way. Maybe their stories can inspire you to do the same thing.

    ABOVE Turning fine art into a sales opportunity can be daunting but there are a range of approaches.

    Ian

    Bram

    ham

  • business matters

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 069

    You wouldnt think it to look at his beautifully crafted images, but Ian Bramham is not a full-time professional photographer. His day job as an architect delivers the bulk of his income; he loves his career and isnt about to step out of it. However, he is earning a steady extra income from fine art photography, and his work is increasingly attracting the attention of those who are prepared to pay 100 or more for a beautifully crafted piece of art.

    For me fine art photography is not a full-time career, but rather its something that I discovered by accident, says Ian. About six years ago I needed to replace our familys compact film camera and, after some research on the web, I bought a digital Fujifilm F31. It was around this time that I discovered many amateur photographers who were publishing beautiful photos online using the same digital compact camera. That photography could be art was a complete revelation to me and I decided to give it a try.

    From the outset it was black & white that captured Ians imagination, and hes applied the approach to a wide range of subjects to give his a work a distinctive and cohesive look. Im interested in photographing the natural beauty and visual drama of our urban and rural environment, he says. I try and emphasise this by finding great subjects and light and by keeping the composition as simple and direct as possible.

    Up to now Ian has marketed himself and his work through a comprehensive website and well-followed blog and, although representation through a gallery is something he might explore in the future, at the moment hes happy to grow organically and to generate his own publicity. Its helped me that my work has been shortlisted or has won in regional and national photographic competitions, he says, and Ive also had some of my photos featured in professionally curated exhibitions at prestigious spaces, including the Cube Gallery in Manchester, the Getty Images Gallery and the National Theatre in London. Im also holding my first solo exhibition later this year, which will be in a commercial art gallery in Cheshire.

    The requests for prints and commercial licensing of his work started to arrive after Ian began posting his images online, and it led him to think of ways in which he could develop this interest. As a result of these enquiries I set up my own photography website which offers signed prints for sale, he says. I used Clikpic for my website since it has an easy-to-use online admin system and doesnt require HTML expertise. Ive found it very cost-effective and Im pleased with it.

    I also have some photos marketed through Getty Images. Although none of my images are really typical of stock photography they sell very well and bring in a regular monthly income. Prints on Ians website are on sale in three sizes, which vary in price from

    Im interested in photographing the natural beauty and visual drama of our urban and rural environment by finding great subjects

    75 to 125. He also offers a signed limited edition book of his images that sells online for 156, and included in the price is a signed limited edition print of one of the photos from the book. Commercial licensing (for non-Getty images) is negotiated on a case-by-case basis, and Ians most recent large value licence was to a Danish retailer who wanted to license a number of his photos for sale in its stores as framed art.

    Prints sold via my website are signed and unframed, says Ian. I use a local commercial photo lab: prints less than 18x12ins are digital C-type on Fujifilm DP11 pro lustre paper, while larger prints are produced on an Epson Stylus Pro printer in tandem with pigment-based Ultrachrome K3 inks. At my solo exhibition I will be offering my framed prints in signed limited editions.

    more inFormationwww.ianbramham.com

    IMAGES Ian dropped into fine art photography almost by accident; after replacing the familys compact film camera he realised just what he could achieve with a digital model and discovered a love for black & white imagery.

    case stuDY 1:on the sidelines: Ian BramhamAn architect, Ian Bramham is also gaining a steady income via his fine art photography online, concentrating on his favoured black & white style.

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    13 IssuEsFoR just

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  • PP80.indd 1 19/4/13 12:01:54

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 081

    GEARAll the vital gear youll needto be a successful professional photographer

    082 nikons nEw dx kinGThe new D7100 from Nikon takes crop sensor DSLRs to a new level.

    092 BUYERs GUidE: sTUdio ACCEssoRiEsWe take a look at the wide selection of studio accessories available for the working photographer.All the vital gear youll need

    to be a successful professional photographer

    EssEntial pro gEar

    rEvEalEd

    090 TEsTEd: wAComs nEw pRo lEvEl TABlETWe test out the new Intuos 5 tablet from Wacom and see what devices of this kind can offer the professional .

  • GEAR

    082 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    NIKON D7100

    Just as you thought Nikon had forgotten about its DX DSLR range, along comes a new flagship product, the D7100. Adam Duckworth sees what it has to offer the professionalWORDS & PICTURES ADAM DUCKWORTH

    Nikons new DX flagship

    ikons new D7100 might sound like a minor upgrade to the D7000, but in fact its the firms new flagship DX cropped-sensor camera. Its

    actually an all-new sensor that gets pretty close to the performance of full-frame cameras but at a fraction of the cost.

    The D7000 was rightly a huge success, with its pro-like spec: 16.2-megapixel sensor, 14-bit processing, twin memory card slots, full 1080p HD movies, 100 per cent viewfinder and wide ISO range. The D7100 adds a new 24.1-megapixel sensor without the low-pass filter for super sharp images, bigger LCD screen, advanced autofocus using technology borrowed from the flagship D4, improved ergonomics, upgraded HD video and it even weighs slightly less. And with a current body-only street price of about 1000, it costs roughly the same as the D7000 when it was launched a little over two years ago. Having said that, of course, the D7000 is now available for about 350 less.

    For the moment, the D7000 stays in Nikons range as a lower-spec DX camera. The D7100 sits higher than the ageing D300s, which was previously lauded as the range-topping semi-pro DX machine. The D7100s waterproofing matches that of the D300s, which was previously the old cameras trump card.

    Brand new sensorWhat all of Nikons older DX models lack is what is at the heart of the new D7100: the all-new 24-megapixel sensor. True, youll find 24-megapixel DX sensors in the D5200 and D3200, but the D7100s version surpasses these by not having an anti-aliasing or low-pass filter the first Nikon to do away with it.

    In every other Nikon DX or Canon cropped-sensor camera, the low-pass filter slightly blurs the image at the taking stage, and its then sharpened by software after capture. This may seem like a strange thing to do, but without this filter you would often get false colours and moir patterning on certain subjects, usually objects such as fine fabrics or buildings that feature repeating patterns. This is troublesome, if not impossible, to remove successfully in post-processing.

    N

    A handful of cameras mainly medium-format models and the Leica M9 and M8 rangefinders that use CCD sensors rather than the more usual CMOS, plus the Ricoh GXR and Fujifilms X100 likewise dont have this filter, but none are conventional DSLRs. Then, last year Nikon threw the cat among the pigeons with its D800E. A variant of the mighty 36-megapixel D800, the D800E has had the anti-aliasing effects of its low-pass filter removed, rather than leaving the filter out completely.

    ISO cOmpARISON: HOW DOES THE D7100 pERFORm?Up to ISO 1600, the D7100 performs well, but after that noise starts to creep in, and by the extended setting of 12,800 it's obtrusive and unuseable.

    ISO 100 ISO 800 ISO 1600 ISO 3200 ISO 6400 ISO 12,800

  • GEAR

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 083

    ABOVE With its 1.5 crop sensor the D7100 might be ideal for wildlife and sports but it's also a very capable studio camera.

    This ISO 100 shot , lit by just two HMI continuous lights, shows a good range of tones and control of noise in the shadow areas.

  • GEAR

    092 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    To produce studio shots that make your work stand out, your camera and lights arent enough. High-quality studio accessories will not only add something extra to your photos but can make your life easier too. Such accessories range from backgrounds and stands for your

    lighting and kit, through to unique props for specialist genres. Finding the accessories that will add value to your business can be time-consuming, so weve put together a guide to give you an overview of who and what you should be looking for.

    BUYERS GUIDE: Studio AccessoriesTheres no shortage of accessories when it comes to adding to your studio set-up, but the ones you invest in need to add value to your photography. Heres a guide to whats on offer from some of the bestWORDS IAN FYFE

    Interfits range of studio accessories includes a special combi boom stand (90) with a foldaway arm that can be opened to hold a small lighting head or reflector. With the arm folded away, it can be used as a standard lighting stand. Alternatively, Interfits 2-Section Boom Arm (33) can be fitted to other lighting stands.

    Interfits range of backgrounds includes Masters Giant Collapsible, Double Sided Collapsibles and Muslin, as well as graduated backgrounds (85). For still life and product shots, Interfit also has a tabletop studio with a matte, opaque and non-reflective white surface (180 top right), or a Portable LED Studio Table, which includes a 200-LED panel, flexi-arm and power pack (140).

    One of Sliks best-selling tripods for more than 20 years, the Master Classic (120) is still going strong and provides support for heavy equipment. All legs and joints are metal, while the textured locking rings allow easy use and adjustment. It can hold 6kg, making it suitable even for medium-format cameras. The standard head is the Master Classic Head, a two-way pan head also with an all-metal construction and one-lever operation.

    For a studio tripod thats easy to move around, Slik also has the Pro 700DX (150). The legs are made from AMT super titanium alloy, which has a high strength to weight ratio so that its light but sturdy: it can hold equipment weighing up to 11kg.

    Calumet has a range of light stands covering all requirements. This includes the Low Light Stand with a maximum height of 1.23m, a 4.1m light stand (55) that folds to a length of 1.15m, and many standard and air-cushioned stands with heights in between.

    Calumet also offers a complete background support kit with adjustable stands, crossbar and a carry case (100), designed to hold background paper rolls and PVC or muslin backdrops. Its portable shooting table has a 60x60cm surface that can be disassembled and transported in its case (150) and, if youre shooting portraits, Calumet also offers a posing table on casters with heights adjustable from 78cm to 130cm (71).

    Bowens offers a wide range of stands to use with its lighting heads, with ten models catering for most studio needs. The smallest is the Backlight Stand (32), with a maximum height of 85cm, while the tallest Heavy-Duty Air Stand (90) extends to 3.95m and offers protection. A Heavy-Duty Boom Stand (163) can support lights weighing up to 7.5kg, or lighting booms.

    Recently added to Bowens studio range is the Jetstream Wind Machine. This has variable speed settings and includes an infrared remote control. It can be floor-mounted or attached to a lighting support or ceiling tracks via the 5/8in mount. Two models are available, the Jetstream 250 (850) and the larger 350 (1129).

    www.interfitphotographic.com

    www.intro2020.co.uk

    www.calumetphoto.co.uk www.bowens.co.uk

    Interfit

    Slik

    Calumet Bowens

    lighting and kit, through to unique props for specialist genres. Finding the accessories that will add value to your business can be time-consuming, so weve put together a guide to give you an overview of who and what you

    Theres no shortage of accessories when it comes to adding to your studio set-up, but the ones you invest in need to add value to your photography. Heres a guide to whats on offer from some of the best

    Bowens

  • GEAR

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 093

    GEAR

    As well as its range of tripods, which includes models designed for the studio, Manfrotto has light stands and background supports. Amongst the light stands is the Light Boom 35 Black A25 Black (365), which has casters, a maximum extension of 2.8m and a load capacity of 6kg. For a compact design, Manfrotto also has the Nano Black stand (55), which has a closed length of just 48cm but extends with five sections to a full height of 1.9m.

    Manfrotto also offers background support systems, including a set of stands with support, bag and spring clamp in a carry bag (250). Its designed to support rolls or sheets of background paper and other materials, and can support loads of up to 10kg.

    As an alternative to traditional backgrounds, Lastolite has its Plain Collapsible Backgrounds, and new colours have recently been added to the range. These reversible and crease-resistant backgrounds, easily portable due to their foldaway design, were previously only available in black, white and grey, but are now also in blue/pink, red/purple and orange/yellow versions (160). Also requiring no stands is Lastolites new Panoramic Background (420). It has a three-panel aluminium framework thats self-supporting, and to which the fabric backgrounds clip. Currently, black and chromakey green covers are available (126 each). The frame is up to 4m wide, and its also collapsible.

    Tetenal is the UK distributor of the top US brand for background rolls, Savage. The seamless backgrounds include 50 colours of background paper, as well as the Infinity and Accent ranges.

    Infinity includes: Vinyl with a matte finish; Hand-Painted Muslin for an old world look; Collapsible Backgrounds, which are reversible cotton; and Canvas with a hand-painted top layer, a blackout middle layer and a vinyl backing.

    Accent includes: Washed Muslin, double-sided with subtle blended appearance; Crushed Muslin with a distinct mottled appearance; Retro in six vintage designs; and Solid, simple 100 per cent cotton muslin backgrounds in white, black, green and grey.

    Kenros range includes adjustable background supports that cover heights of 77cm to 3.94m and widths of 1.7m to 4.2m (122-219). Also available are cotton backgrounds in 21 colours. All are available in Regular size at 2.4x2.7m (63), while some are available in Large, measuring 2.9x5m (126).

    Kenro also has products for still-life and product photography. The Photo Cube (58) is a pop-up white translucent cube that can be packed into a 30cm flat case. Still-life tables with a translucent white panel over an aluminium frame are available with panel sizes of 60x130cm (128) or 100x200cm (460). Both can be disassembled for portability in the supplied carry case.

    Orbitvu has a top-quality turntable for product photography, which can be used to create three-dimensional animations of products for online use. This is available in mini, midi and maxi versions, with respective turntable diameters of 50cm, 75cm and 180cm. Prices depend on the package and software you select, but start at 1700.

    The most recent addition to Orbitvus range is the Alphashot, which is unique in that its the first compact studio with automatic background removal. Automatic image processing and background removal tools allow 2D, 3D and 360 product images that you can send straight to your client. Three versions of the Alphashot are available, including an XL model, with prices starting at 4495.

    www.manfrotto.co.uk www.lastolite.com

    www.tetenaluk.com

    www.kenro.co.uk

    www.aj-s.co.uk

    Lastolite

    Tetenal

    Kenro

    Orbitvu

    Orbitvu has a top-quality turntable for product photography, which can be used to create three-dimensional animations of products for online use. This is available in mini, midi and maxi versions, with respective turntable diameters of 50cm, 75cm and 180cm. Prices depend on the package and software you select, but start at 1700.

    which is unique in that its the first compact studio with automatic background removal. Automatic image processing and background removal tools allow 2D, 3D and 360 product images that you can send straight to your client. Three versions of the Alphashot are available, including an XL model, with prices starting at 4495.

    www.aj-s.co.uk

    Kenro

    Orbitvu

    Tetenal is the UK distributor of the top US brand for background rolls, Savage. The seamless backgrounds include 50 colours of background paper, as well as the Infinity and Accent ranges.

    for an old world look; Collapsible Backgrounds, which are reversible cotton; and Canvas with a hand-painted top layer, a blackout middle layer and a vinyl backing.

    blended appearance; Crushed Muslin with a distinct mottled appearance; Retro in six vintage designs; and Solid, simple 100 per cent cotton muslin backgrounds in white, black, green and grey.

    www.tetenaluk.com

    Lastolite

    Tetenal

    As well as its range of tripods, which includes models designed for the studio, Manfrotto has light stands and background supports.

    Manfrotto

  • SHOWCASE

    096 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    A D V E R T I S E M E N T F E A T U R E

    SHOWCASE: Fine art papers

    MOrE infOrMAtiOn MOrE infOrMAtiOn

    MOrE infOrMAtiOn MOrE infOrMAtiOn

    www.cansoninfinity.com 01249 714555www.fotospeed.com

    01603 759266www.hahnemuehle.com

    01234 572000; www.fujifilm.eu/uk/products/photofinishing/large-format-printing/inkjet-media-overview

    Canson FotospeedCanson Discovery Fine Art Paper test packs, which come in a choice of Photo or Fine Art, allow you to discover which of the award-winning Canson Infinity papers best suits your style for just 6. Both packs include A4 sheets of the new generation Canson PhotoArt HD Canvas 400gsm. Its bright white, instant dry, matte finish is available in cut sheets and rolls to provide an excellent consistency in structure and weave. Also included in the packs is the TIPA 2010 Best Paper: Canson Baryta.

    If youre looking for a traditional darkroom finish to your digital prints, Fotospeeds Platinum Baryta media bridges the gap between wet and digital darkrooms, whilst completing the Fotospeed Platinum family of papers.

    Fotospeed Platinum Baryta 300gsm contains barium sulphate which gives an unglazed glossy finish and a natural base colour. This paper promises to offer the deepest blacks while also preserving delicate highlights with smooth transitions.

    Hahnemhle is the worlds leading brand of Fine Art Papers and is renowned for its excellent traditional papermaking. Today those skills are applied to the creation of a superb range of Digital Fine Art inkjet papers that produce exquisite archival quality prints. Hahnemhles newest addition, the Photo Range, includes the first PE papers with a microporous gloss and lustre inkjet coating. The collection features four papers, from 200 to 260gsm, with all the benefits associated with Hahnemhle paper.

    Everyone knows that the choice of media is crucial for photographers who really care about producing profitable, professional quality work. Even keen amateurs will want to ensure their images stand up to scrutiny and the test of time. Luckily, Fujifilm has a broad range of exhibition/museum quality fine art media to suit whatever the intended end result.

    Choose from Fine Art Fibre Baryte Gloss, at 310gsm; or Fine Art Photo Rag Paper, Etch Paper, Rough Paper or Torchon Paper, all 300gsm.

    When it comes to printing your work, paper quality is essential for achieving the best prints. These eight companies provide a cornucopia of classic media for the fine art photographer

    Hahnemhles Fine Art PapersFujifilm Fine Art media Hahnemhles Fine Art PapersFujifilm Fine Art media

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 097

    SHOWCASEA D V E R T I S E M E N T F E A T U R E

    MOrE infOrMAtiOn MOrE infOrMAtiOn

    MOrE infOrMAtiOn MOrE infOrMAtiOn

    01892 771245www.onlinepaper.co.uk

    01707 273747www.simlab.co.uk

    01992 571775 www.innovaart.com

    0116 289 3644ww.tetenaluk.com

    The Online Paper Company was the first to sell Hahnemhle digital inkjet papers in a webshop in 1999. Its online catalogue offers one of the largest ranges of digital inkjet paper, including the complete Hahnemhle range of papers, the award-winning Canson Baryta as well as specialist papers such as Somerset Enhanced and Museo Silver Rag. Papers stocked also contain top sellers from PermaJet, Ilford and Fotospeed. The companys philosophy is centred on customers being able to try out many different types of paper.

    Gicle archival gallery quality printing, with 1440dpi to 2880dpi output resolution, is perfect for photographers looking for professional, great value, large format prints.

    Gicle papers include: Fotospeed PF Lustre 270gsm, Fotospeed PF Gloss 270gsm, Hahnemhle Photo Rag 308gsm, Hahnemhle German Etching 310gsm and Hahnemhle Fine Art Baryta 325gsm.

    15 per cent off code: ARTPRO (expires 31/05/13, Gicle prints only).

    Over the past decade, Innova Art has been dedicated to producing high-quality inkjet media for fine art and photographic reproduction. The Innova range includes a wide selection of matte finish inkjet papers, available in a selection of weights and textures; these are designed to give you the highest quality prints when framing or exhibiting. Also included in the range is the award-winning FibaPrint product line, developed to become the digital equivalent to traditional fibre based darkroom papers. To give your images the ultimate in fine art treatment, why not try one of the canvases also on offer? Available in a matte or high gloss finish, they can be stretched to a variety of sizes. All Innova media is available in cut sheets up to A2 format or rolls up to 60in wide.

    Ilford Galerie Prestige Gold Cotton and Fine Art papers have been created for the professional fine art printer. The Gold Cotton is available in Smooth and Textured papers, both 330gsm and 100 per cent cotton rag complement the Fine Art Smooth and Textured 220gsm. Both deliver stunning contrast and sharpness for colour or black and white prints.

    The range sits alongside some other fantastic finishes including the celebrated Gold Fibre Silk; TIPA award-winning Smooth Gloss and Smooth Pearl; and Photokinas star product, the Prestige Gold Mono Silk, produced specifically for black and white images.

    Tetenal is a one-stop shop for a wide range of inkjet papers, including Hahnemhle, Kodak Professional, SpectraJet and Epson.

    Online Paper Simlab Gicle Prints

    Innova ArtIlford Galerie Prestige

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