Persuasive Techniques (Notes) - We Techniques (Notes) ACADEMIC VOCABULARY Persuasive techniques – methods to influence others’ beliefs, opinions or actions Appeals to reason (logical appeals) – logical arguments based on verifiable evidence,

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  • Persuasive Techniques (Notes)

    ACADEMIC VOCABULARY

    Persuasive techniques methods to influence others beliefs, opinions or actions

    Appeals to reason (logical appeals) logical arguments based on verifiable evidence, such as facts, statistics, or expert testimony

    Appeals to emotion (emotional appeals) statements intended to affect the listeners feelings about a subject

    Ethical appeals - make use of what an audience values and believes to be good or true

    Appeals to pity - attempts to persuade using emotionspecifically, sympathyrather than evidence

    Testimonial an expert or first-hand account

    Bait and switch technique in which a customer seeking specific product is lured in, then persuaded to buy something else

    Propaganda information designed to manipulate political opinion

    Bandwagon technique which urges the listener to do or believe something because everyone else does

    Plain folks techniques that attempts to convince the public that certain views reflect those of the common person

    Snob appeal technique that suggests that you can be like the perfectly shaped people who use a product

    Loaded language (charged language) - words with strong positive or negative associations

    Purr words terms that make people feel good about the subject being addressed

    Snarl words terms that make people react negatively

    Weasel words - words and phrases aimed at creating an impression that something specific and meaningful has been said, when in fact only a vague or ambiguous claim has been communicated

    How to Identify Persuasive Techniques

    Step 1 Recognize persuasive messages text or media addressed directly at an audience

    response.

    Try to figure out if the message is possibly trying to make you change your views.

    Step 2 Identify logical appeals directed at an audiences reasoning.

    Strong arguments backed with good evidence persuade effectively.

    EXAMPLE: The library should be open Sundays; 68 percent of students polled agree.

  • Step 3 Identify ethical appeals directed at values.

    EXAMPLE: Vote for the Ozone Act to help protect the earth.

    Step 4 Identify emotional appeals aimed at strong feelings.

    Appeals to fear, anger, pity, and vanity can strengthen a message, but can also disguise

    poor reasoning.

    Step 5 Identify appeals by association linked to an authority.

    The message may be delivered as a testimonial.

    EXAMPLES:

    Appeal to loyalty Show your commitment buy locally grown fruits.

    Plain folks appeal The dentists at West Group are your friends and neighbors.

    Bandwagon appeal Millions of teenagers use Suds-o Soap. Shouldnt you?

    Snob appeal: eat Lolas lo-fat, hi-flavor cheese You deserve the best.

    Appeal to authority As a leading engineer, I recommend Ready-Able toasters.

    Transfer One sip of Ocean Ade and youll feel youre at the beach.

    Step 6 Identify loaded language.

    Words that manipulate may be extremely positive (purr or glittering), extremely

    negative (snarl), or extremely vague (weasel).

    EXAMPLES

    Purr words: The fresh and delicious taste of Dazzle Sprinkles is unforgettable.

    Snarl words: My opponent in the mayors race is sneaky and unreliable.

    Weasel words: Jackies Shoe Repair will make your boots almost like new.

    Step 7 Evaluate the message.

    Think about the writers purpose, perspective, and bias.

    Ask yourself: Are the claims supported by facts? Do loaded words send a deceptive

    message?