metering and exposure. basic exposure an exposure at its most basic level is a combination of your...

Download Metering and Exposure. Basic Exposure An exposure at its most basic level is a combination of your shutter speed and aperture. An example of an exposure

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  • Metering and Exposure

  • Basic ExposureAn exposure at its most basic level is a combination of your shutter speed and aperture. An example of an exposure is 1/125 @ f11This means the shutter speed is 1/125th of a second and your aperture is f11. When combined they make an exposure.

  • Shutter SpeedStandard shutter speeds:1/21/4 1/81/151/301/60 This is the slowest shutter speed you shoot handheld. Any exposure that requires a longer shutter speed than this should be shot on a tripod.1/1251/2501/5001/1000

  • Shutter SpeedThe shutter speed controls how you photograph motion. There are 4 ways to use shutter speed:1. Stop motion2. Subject motion blur3. Panning4. Static

  • Stop MotionIn order to stop motion you have to shoot with a shutter speed of at least 1/500th of a second.Since the shutter is only open for a fraction of a second, it freezes time and the subject matter remains in focus.

  • Subject Motion BlurThis is achieved by using lower shutter speeds on a subject that is moving very quickly. The camera remains static while the subject moves. The blur is created because the placement of the subject changes in the time it takes for the shutter to open and close.

  • Panning ShotThis shot is a mix between motion blur and stop motion, but instead of stopping motion through the camera, it is physical.Instead of increasing the shutter speed to 1/500th or higher, you use a regular shutter speed of 1/60th or 1/125th and follow the motion of the subject with your camera so it remains in the frame as opposed to crossing the frame.This creates a blur on the background insteadof the subject.

  • Static ShotA static shot is as it sounds. There is no movement to consider, so the shutter speed is less relevant. Aside from considering if you need a tripod or not, the shutter speed doesnt matter.

  • ApertureStandard aperture settings:f1.4f2.0f2.8f4f5.6f8f11f16f22

  • ApertureYour aperture works much like your eye. On a bright day, your iris will constrict to limit the amount of light it lets in. You consider this f22, or the smallest aperture.In a dark setting your iris will open wide to let in more light. You can consider this f2.0, or one of the widest apertures.

  • Depth of FieldAperture also controls depth of field, or the field in which an object will be in focus. There are three basic depth of fields to consider:Shallow depth of fieldMid-range depth of fieldLarge depth of field

  • Shallow Depth of FieldA shallow depth of field is created by using an aperture of f1.4 to f5.6.This means that the distance in which your subject will be sharp is very small.

  • Mid-Range Depth of FieldThis is in the middle between shallow and large depth of field and uses and aperture of f8-f11.This gives you a little longer distance which will appear in focus.

  • Large Depth of FieldThis will give you the largest distance of focus. Helpful if you are shooting landscapes. Uses aperture of f16 or greater.Notice that the foreground and background are now in focus.

  • Light MeterWhat is a light meter?

  • Light MeterA light meter is used to give you your correct exposure for a scene.All digital cameras have a built in light meter.

  • Light MeterA light meter reads for middle or 18% gray.That means it will give you the exposure that turns the meteredtone into middle gray.When metering you need toconsider highlights, shadows andmid-tones to meter accordingly.

  • Light MeterExample 1: Metering from the highlights.

    Notice that the highlights are brought to near middle gray.

  • Light MeterExample 2: Metering for the shadows.

    Notice how dark or shadow area is brought towards middle gray & highlights are blown out.

  • Light MeterExample 3: Correct exposure using an 18% gray card.

    Notice how highlights remain light and shadows remain dark.

  • Light MeterA gray card is a useful tool for getting correct exposures, but it is not always practical. Think about how a meter works and what you can meter from for a correct exposure.

  • Light MeterHow to read your light meter:In your camera, your meter reading goes from -2 f-stops below correct exposure to +2 f-stops above correct exposure.If you are metering from a gray card, you want the reading to be right in the middle.

  • Light MeterIf your meter reading looks like this:

    You are 1 f-stop overexposed. If your settings are currently 1/60 @ f11, then you would change your settings to 1/60 @ f16.This will make your meter look like this:

  • Light MeterIf your meter reading looks like this:

    You are 1 f-stop underexposed. If your settings are currently 1/60 @ f11, then you would change your settings to 1/60 @ f8.This will make your meter look like this:

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