Love Food Hate Waste Showcase

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EPA12/0948. Love Food Hate Waste Showcase. Overview. This presentation showcases some of the exciting Love Food Hate Waste projects run by our partners. Projects are divided into themes to show how the same idea can be adapted to different situations. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Love Food Hate Waste Showcase

    EPA12/0948

  • OverviewThis presentation showcases some of the exciting Love Food Hate Waste projects run by our partners.

    Projects are divided into themes to show how the same idea can be adapted to different situations.

    Some projects received Love Food Hate Waste funding. Others have been self funded by the partner.Banner created by Warringah Council

  • Use Love Food Hate Waste messagesTo assist households with reducing food waste, the Love Food Hate Waste program has a series of key messages. These messages feature on our resources.

    MidWaste and the Nature Conservation Council of NSW used the key messages as themes for their workshop series. Workshops topics included:smart shoppingmenu planningportion sizemanaging unavoidable food waste.Nature Conservation Council workshop participants

  • Link with existing activitiesIf there is a successful existing activity in your community such as a festival, publication, workshop or network, ascertain if it would be suitable to incorporate Love Food Hate Waste.

    Partners who have achieved this are: Oxfam Australia and their 3things website The North East Waste Forum and their Greenhouse performances Hunters Hill Council, Lane Cove Council and the Nature Conservation Council and the Moocooboola festival.

    Love Food Hate Waste was incorporated into the Moocooboola Festival in Hunters Hill.

  • Get the community involved Workshops, seminars and other events allow you to directly engage with your community. You can discuss food waste avoidance in an appropriate manner for the event and can answer questions straight away.

    Ideally events would contain a practical element which will allow participants to build their skills and familiarity, an important aspect of behaviour change. This could be achieved by structuring workshops, quizzes and games around Love Food Hate Waste messaging.

    Workshops and challenges have been run by some of our program partners, including:RAMROCUralla and Walcha Council in conjunction with Leapfish Wollondilly, Gosford and Hunters Hill Councils who worked with the Nature Conservation Council of NSW.

  • Create championsCreating champions is another excellent way of gaining community involvement.

    Champions can enthuse and inspire your community about the importance of avoiding food waste and share personal food waste avoidance tips.

    Wollondilly Council, Hunters Hill Council and the Nature Conservation Council of NSW are encouraging people to become Food Waste Champions.

    Champions at the Food Waste Challenge hosted by Hunters Hill Council

  • Create hypeCreating hype will create interest and draw attention to your project.Hype can be created by linking with the interests of the people you want to attract, which may have little to do with food waste. The Institute for Sustainable Futures and City of Sydney Council developed the Love Food Film competition pitched at film students across 7 tertiary education institutions

    Poster developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures and City of Sydney Council to promote the Love Food Film Competition

  • Using a hookAnother way of creating hype is to use a hook.

    Penrith City Council, Holroyd City Council and the University of Western Sydney engaged Jay Huxley, (2011 MasterChef) to conduct cooking demonstrations at local farmers markets and on campus.

    The hook acts as your messenger and helps create buzz.

    Any local identity who is a well respected member of the community with influence can be a great messenger. The LFHW program also has several Ambassadors that suit your project.Jay Huxley during a Love Food Hate Waste cooking workshop

  • Be uniqueGreat examples are: Love Food Hate Waste mural on Alfalfa House, Marrickville CouncilHolroyd City Councils Love Your Leftovers cook book and website Supermarket tours run by Nutrition AustraliaLake Macquarie City Council Sustainable Eating Guide use of television advertising by Midwaste

    Artwork design for the Love Food Hate Waste mural on Alfalfa House, Marrickville Council.

  • Work in partnership

    Working in partnership can be beneficial as you can share resources, knowledge, skills and contacts. For example a group of northern Sydney Councils worked together to create an interactive display.

    Many regional waste groups delivered projects in partnership with their member councils and/or community organisations. NetWaste worked with key organisations in Orange to deliver their recent LFHW project.

    Partnerships can also be made with education providers. Wollongong City Council and the University of Wollongong delivered workshops for students in the university student accommodation.

    Participants in NetWastes Shopping Challenge

  • ConclusionSuccessful projects consider these questions:what is already working well in my community?which LFHW key target audiences are in my community?is there any existing activity to which you can link and add value with LFHW messaging?is there a unique opportunity for you to promote the program and its calls to action?how can you get your community involved and help them to build food waste avoidance skills that bring about behaviour change?Which other organisations and individuals in your community have an interest in working on food waste avoidance and/or your key target audience?

    Our LFHW grantees and partners are doing a variety of incredible things around NSW. This presentation will showcase just some of the great activities that our Round 1 grantees are doing. It demonstrates a range of activities that have been designed for individual communities and to target specific audiences in line with the LFHW research. It may also inspire you to develop an LFHW project in your community.Rather than looking at individual projects, we want to be able to show you all of the exciting and interesting things these grantees have done. We will look at:how our grantees are using the LFHW messages,linking LFHW with pre-existing programs in their organisation/region/community,have developed unique ways of educating the community about LFHW and bringing about behaviour change,how they get the community involved, using a hook/creating buzz, Benefits of working with partners andthe work that the LFHW team at OEH have been doing.

    Lets begin with how our partners have used LFHW key messages.A key component of all LFHW projects is incorporating the LFHW key messages. This is being done by MidWaste as they have used the LFHW messages as themes for their workshops. These themes include smart shopping such as shopping to a list, tips on menu planning, considering portion sizes and how to manage food waste that can not be managed. Other projects that have also done this are the NCC Food Waste Challenge.

    A successful project strategy is to link with already existing activities or groups.

    Many of our partners are doing just this. For example Bankstown Council included a cooking demonstration at Bankstown Bites which is a food focused festival in Bankstown. This is a great way of promoting LFHW as you can engage directly with households and it can add value to the program you are linking with. Also you may even receive media exposure as was the case for Bankstown Council. (indicate image on slide)

    The North East Waste Forum has incorporated LFHW into their Green House program. The Green House is a mobile waste education unit with interactive displays and performers who attend events and perform. LFHW will be incorporated into these performances. LFHW materials such as pull up displays, menu cards and brochures will be on display with an opportunity for people to learn more about the program.

    Several grantees used existing events to launch their LFHW projects and showcase the success of the participants (eg Hunters Hill & Lane Cove).Other ways of seeking community involvement is running workshops and challenges that are hands on. Workshops and challenges are being run by some of our program partners. They include RAMROC, Uralla and Walcha Council in conjunction with Leapfish and Wollondilly, Gosford and Hunters Hill Councils who are working with the Nature Conservation Council of NSW.

    Workshops and challenges are a great way of directly engaging with people and being able to discuss food waste avoidance in more detail and you are able to answer questions. Challenges and workshops can also contain a practical element which will allow participants to build their skills and build familiarity (an important aspect of behaviour change). This could be achieved by structuring workshops around LFHW messaging such as tips when buying, cooking and storing food to avoid food waste.

    Wollondilly Council and the Nature Conservation Council of Australia have added another element to their challenge they are encouraging people to become Food Waste Champions. These champions will educate their community about the importance of reducing food waste and provide the community with simple tips that they can do to avoid food waste. Bankstown: launch at Bankstown Bites with cooking demo, Community Kitchen workshop series targeting CALD, individuals and young families. Capacity building workshops menu planning, shopping, cooking and storage. Focus on behaviour change strategies.

    Penrith: Farmers markets presence, cooking demonstrations, workshops at lunch for busy people and weekends. Celebrity chef Jay Huxley to promote and act as hook.Bankstown: launch at Bankstown Bites with cooking demo, Community Kitchen workshop series targeting CALD, individuals and young families. Capacity building workshops menu planning, shopping, cooking and storage. Focus on behaviour change strategies.

    Penrith: Farmers markets presence, cooking demonstrations, workshops at lunch for busy people and weekends. Celebrity chef Jay Huxley to promote and act as hook.Another way of engaging the community is by using a hook. Jay Huxley, from the 2011 series of MasterChef has been engaged by Penrith City Council, Holroyd City Council and the University of Western Sydney (not a grantee) to conduct cooking demonstrations which not only promote healthy eating and inexpensive meals but the LFHW messages have been tailored to suit the local audience. Makes LFHW fun & enjoyable. Having a celebrity chef also helps create buzz (leads to social change).

    When choosing a hook you could select a local identity. Possibly someone associated with cooking great food or growing fantastic produce. It may even be a sport personality or a local business owner or a well respected member of the community with influence (to act as your messenger).As well as hosting LFHW stand at events, some of our partners have been inventive.

    Holroyd Council have developed a Love Your Leftovers Cookbook. The cookbook will include recipes and food storage tips and nostalgic antidotes that have primarily been sourced from senior members of their community and in their sister city Hay. The cookbook and LFHW workshops will be launched using a celebrity chef. People can engage on a range of levels you are giving them that choice (i.e. at home in their own kitchen or at a workshop)Message is lasting with the longevity of the cookbookCook book and workshops complement each otherWorkshops are fun, part of a groupCookbook is social proof other people doing it and succeeding

    As well as working with local identities, it may be beneficial to work in partnership with other people interested in food waste avoidance.

    Many of our grantees are working in partnership. This includes groups of councils such as Mosman, Manly, Pittwater, Willoughby, Warringah and North Sydney Councils. They will create an interactive visual display that will educate their communities about food waste avoidance and LFHW.

    Many regional waste groups such as RAMROC, Midwaste, SERROC and NetWaste are also delivering a LFHW project in partnership with their local councils. NetWaste is working with key organisations in Orange such as Taste of Orange, Orange Rotary and the Orange Farmers markets. By working with key identities in your region you may be able to use the resources that your partner already has.

    Partnerships could also be made with educational providers. MidWaste is working with the North Coast Institute of TAFE to deliver a series of workshops. Also Uralla and Walcha Councils are working with LeapFish to deliver LFHW orientated presentations during their community festivals.

    What are the benefits

    Feature Holroyd and hayKey points to consider from this presentation are:

    How can you incorporate the LFHW messages into your program?Is there any existing activity which you can link LFHW to and value add?Is there anything unique that you can think of which will promote LFHW?How can you get your community involved and help them to build food waste avoidance skills that bring about behaviour change?Is there any one you could work in partnership with?

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