Latin American Art || Marina Gutiérrez

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  • Marina GutirrezAuthor(s): Luis CamnitzerSource: Art Journal, Vol. 51, No. 4, Latin American Art (Winter, 1992), p. 9Published by: College Art AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/777273 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 09:24

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  • Marina Gutidrrez NUYORQUINA*

    Two fields of imagery are contrasted in Enchanted Island. The upper half is crowded with archetypical and stereotypical symbols of Puerto Rican culture and history. In the top right corner a slave ship emerges from the sea. An African cane cutter

    standing below is mirrored by a fisherman, descen- dant of Spaniards. Below an arch of clouds and Taino stone work stands the body of earth, the

    indigenous mestiza Mother-the arc of her life cut

    by a white hand performing an operation of steriliza-

    tion, breaking the past from the present, the present from the future. Below, floating on a sea of red, is the green topographical island, encircled by mili-

    tary ships and planes, sites of mineral and indus- trial installations mapped as planned by the United States program of strategic exploitation. In short, a visual metaphor for five hundred years of history.

    *New York Puerto Rican in the feminine gender.

    MARINA GUTIERREZ, long-time director of Cooper Union's Saturday program for minority high school

    students, received a painting fellowship in 1988 from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

    4&i 4

    .........................i';

    9119

    Marina Guti6rrez, Enchanted Island, 1986, diptych, acrylic on paper, 60 x 30 inches. Museo del Barrio, New York.

    ART JOURNAL

    9

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    Article Contentsp. 9

    Issue Table of ContentsArt Journal, Vol. 51, No. 4, Latin American Art (Winter, 1992), pp. 1-111Front Matter [pp. 1-108]Artists' PagesRecent Latin American Art[Introduction] [p. 6]Herman Braun-Vega [p. 7]Guillermo Gmez-Pea [p. 8]Marina Gutirrez [p. 9]Patricia Israel [p. 10]Ricardo Rodrguez Brey [p. 11]Nelbia Romero [p. 12]Jonas dos Santos [p. 13]John Valadez [p. 14]Carlos Zerpa [p. 15]

    Editors' StatementThe Columbus Quincentenary and Latin American Art: A Critical Evaluation [pp. 16-20]

    Translating 1492: Mexico's and Spain's First National Celebrations of the "Discovery" of the Americas [pp. 21-29]Africa in the Art of Latin America [pp. 30-38]The Virgin of Guadalupe: Symbol of Conquest or Liberation? [pp. 39-47]"Civilizing" Rio de Janeiro: Four Centuries of Conquest through Architecture [pp. 48-56]Postmodern Disalignments and Realignments of the Center/Periphery [pp. 57-59]Beyond "The Fantastic": Framing Identity in U. S. Exhibitions of Latin American Art [pp. 60-68]Recapturing History: The (Un)Official Story in Contemporary Latin American Art [pp. 69-80]Exhibition ReviewsReview: Gertrude Ksebier and Helen Levitt [pp. 83-85+87+89]Review: Chiefly Feasts [pp. 91-93]

    Book ReviewsReview: 19th-Century American Painting [pp. 95+97]Review: Feminism and Impressionism [pp. 99+101+103]Review: The Museum [pp. 103-106]Review: Cubist Poetry [pp. 106-107]

    Books and Catalogues Received [pp. 109-111]Back Matter