“laboratories without walls” Collaboratories The online professional communities of learning.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> laboratories without walls Collaboratories The online professional communities of learning. </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> The Plan Review of this weeks readings 3 field trips to local collaboratories Introduction to the Activity! 45 minutes to spend on the Activity! Take a short break. Regroup to share and compare. Debrief. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Collabatories Finholt Scientific Collaborations at a Distance Teasley &amp; Wolinsky Collaboratories are a form of Internet mediated science where scientists are connected to each other, to instruments, and to data independent of time and location </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Collabatories Finholt Scientific Collaborations at a Distance Teasley &amp; Wolinsky Collaboratories seek to address these issues: convenient access to scarce instruments, specialized equipment and unique datasets common work setting to support interaction among geographically distributed collaborators resources and mechanisms to support large-scale projects or big science (Weinberg, 1961) inclusion of non-elite scientists in collaborations </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Collabatories Finholt Scientific Collaborations at a Distance Teasley &amp; Wolinsky Issues faced in collaboratory settings: technology access issues: platform, network, complexity competition among collaboratory members and fear of being anticipated, or scooped, by othersalso IP issues fear of work load increase for sites hosting instruments (unfounded in some cases, EMSLC) local participants may resent the invasion of remote participants lead scientists may withdraw from collaboratory interactions, leaving the collaboratory without central leadership measures to determine return of investment of time &amp; resources </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Collabatories Finholt Scientific Collaborations at a Distance Teasley &amp; Wolinsky Technology challenges of distributed collaboration: entry barriers to technology-based environments construction of shared attention knowing who is who in a shared interaction turn-taking mechanisms broadcast orientation versus joint work DYSWIS </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey Deliberately designed environments (as opposed to organically evolved) Both designed as meeting places for community learning Ad-free, business-free Tapped In Educators TeleCHI Human-computer interaction professionals </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey Deliberately designed environments (as opposed to organically evolved) Both designed as meeting places for community learning Ad-free, business-free Tapped In Educators TeleCHI Human-computer interaction professionals </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey Tapped In Work schedule (short day, home in evenings) Seasonality (school year) Tech knowledge low Campus-type interface Synchronous seminar-type events Greeters to draw visitors Rooms sponsored by other organizations TeleCHI Work schedule (longer hours, brief clear windows Participation is event- oriented Tech knowledge high Events-focused interface Events to promote interactions between graduate students and practitioners Regular events to draw visitors Design factors </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey Previous exposure to tech Access to new/developing tech Time and rhythm of access to the venue Breadth and depth of the community Sustainability of interactions RAMP Model Work Roles Tech Artifacts Metrics for success Supporting changes in Process Member Characteristics to Consider </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey All communitiesmust engage and involve members. A community is a group of people who are willing and able to help one another. In this sense, community is more than a way a group of people defines itself: it is a capability that can be developed and improved over time. On-line communities: helping them form and grow </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Different (Key)strokes for Different Folks: Designing online venues for professional communities Bringelson &amp; Carey Invest in the means, not the ends Focus relentlessly on the needs of members Resist the temptation to control Dont assume the community will become self-sustaining (create support infrastructure) Consider environmental factors More than one OLC manager observed that introverts and extroverts adapted very differently to the online tools Extend community-building beyond the discussion space Seek out and support members who take on informal roles Roles tend to remain constant within community, regardless of the individual filling them. What Works? </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Measuring the success of an online community Joseph Cothrel Why are ROI calculations not done? Concerns about attaching dollar values to human relationships Fear that calculating ROI for community efforts is impossible 3 principles to measuring success: Define business objectives/how will success be measured Ongoing measurement and reporting on performance Use measures to make fact-based decisions to improve community over time </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Measuring the success of an online community Joseph Cothrel Community ROI Incremental value: value created for a business by the presence of an online community; could be money, employee satisfaction, product development cycle times Conversion rate: rate at which community results in desired action; e.g. buy a product Community member: member-to-member interaction; affect decisions by referrals; provide targeted market </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> 3 field trips to local collaboratories Science, Physics, Aironomy Research Collaboratory (SPARC) http://www.windows.ucar.edu/SPARC Bug Scope http://bugscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/ The Collaboratory for Community Support http://comnet.org/collaboratorycs/ </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Activity Plan a Collaboratory in only 45 minutes! Each of these areas represents a bit of description of a group and their presumed practices. Please feel to invent the details that will assist you in answering the questions that follow. Research Groups: Competitive Science Collaboratory K-12: Kids are research scientists too! http://bugscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/ SOCIAL POLICY: altruistic, socially minded, non-profit http://comnet.org/collaboratorycs/ </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Activity Tell us about your Collaboratory: What sort of laboratory without walls will you form for your group of researchers? How will you recruit people to participate? How will you retain people, interest and funding? How will you measure the success of your collaboratory? How do you differentiate your collaboratory from a research data base? </li> </ul>

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