kearton richard's nature pictures... (1910)

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THE STONECHAT''The maleis

a strikingly handsome bird*

KEARTONS' NATURE PICTURESBEAUTIFULLY REPRODUCED IN PHOTOGRAVURE, COLOUR, AND BLACK AND WHITE FROM PHOTOGRAPHS BY RICHARD AND CHERRY KEARTON

WITH DESCRIPTIVE TEXTBY

RICHARD KEARTON,

F.Z.S.,

F.R.P.S.

LONDON

THE WAVERLEY BOOK COMPANY, LIMITED7,

8

fif

9

OLD BAILEY

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

-qi

CONTENTS OF VOLUMEmi.i

IPACT. 15

u.riNCH,

THETill-:

.

rciiER BIRD,

TIII:,

on RED-BACKED SHRIKE.

17

COMMON CORMORANT, CRO\V, THE HOODY OR GREY CICKOO, THE l)i>i;\mi si.. THE COMMON DOTTEREL, THE COMMON ro\, THE GUILLEMOT, THE COMMON GULL, THE BLACK-HEADED GULL, THE COMMON GULL, THE GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL, THE KITTIWAKE HAWK, THE SPARROW HEDGEHOG, THE, OR URCHIN HEDGE-SPARROW, THE KESTREL, THE LAPWING, THE, OR PEEWIT LINNET, THE MERLIN, THE MOLE, THE COMMON MOUSE, THE COMMON NIGHTJAR, THE OWL, THE SHORT-EARED OXEYE, THE, OR GREAT TIT OYSTER CATCHER, THE PARTRIDGE, THE COMMON. . . . . . .

25.

11

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03

.59 ... ....

81

5 3

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... .... .

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.47 .69.218511

.

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.2713

.

87

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.... .... ...... . . .

.

.

.

.

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31 71

2919

53 6549 7951

.

PEEWIT. THE, OR LAPWING.

....

8331

PLOVER, THE RINGED PTARMIGAN. THE RARRIT. THE RAT, THE BROWN. ..

......

95

.

.

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3967 57

E336340O

RODIN, THE SANDPIPER, THE

COMMON SEDGF. WARBLER, THE SHRIKE, THE RED-HACKED SQUIRREL, THE SNAKE. THF COMMON OR RINGED SNIPE, THE COMMON SPARROW HAWK, THE STONECHAT, THE TERN, THE COMMON TERN, THE LESSER THRUSH, THE SONG TIT, THE GREAT TOAD, THE NATTERJACK, OR RUSH TROUT. THE COMMON VOLE, THE WATER WARBLER, THE MARSH WARBLER. THE SEDGE WHITETHROAT, THE COMMON OR GREATER WHITETHROAT, THE LESSER WRYNECK, THE

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CONTENTS

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.89

PAGE77

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.93179

73

4311

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1

01

377

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.79 .3345

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.91 .55.

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93 73 23

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35

LISTIMi:

OF PLATES

STONECHAT

(colour)

.......

Frontispiece

COMMON GUILLEMOTS THE FOX YOl'NG SONG THRUSHES THE SQUIRREL (colour) FEMALE SPAKROW HAWK AND YOUNG HEDGE-SPARROW ON NEST BULLFINCH ON NEST MALE RED-BACKED SHRIKE (colour) THE MOLE GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL AT HOME LESSER WHITETHROAT AT NEST CORMORANTS (colour) A HEDGEHOG FAMILY. .

FACING PAOK24

.

........6..

8

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10

.1214Ifi

.

.

18

20

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2224

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2028

NESTLING MERLINS LAPWING ON EGGS

.

30(colour).

THE NATTERJACK TOADLESSER TERN PTARMIGAN ON NEST.

32

WRYNECK AT NESTING-HOLE.. .

.

..... .. .

.34.

3i;

.384042.

YOUNG HOODY CROWS.

(colour).

.

SNIPES COVERING YOfNG

THE COMMON TROUT BLACK-HEADED GfLL THE SHORT-EARED OWL (colour) OYSTER-CATCHER AT HOMEMICE AT SUPPER. .

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41

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40.

THE MARSH WARBLER THE BROWN RAT (colour) COMMON DOTTEREL ON NEST COMMON TERN ON NEST TREE PIPIT FEEDING A YOUNG CUCKOO.

... ....

.48 .505254

56

.58.

6062

LIST

OF PLATES

THE NIGHTJAR (colour) YOUNG RABBITS AT HOME THE COMMON GULL LINNET FEEDING YOUNG YOUNG COMMON WHITETHROATS (colour) THE COMMON, OR RINGED SNAKE THE COMMON SANDPIPER ON HER NEST GREAT TIT, OR OXEYE THE COMMON DORMOUSE (colour) THE COMMON PARTRIDGE THE KITTIWAKE GULL THE KESTREL THE ROBIN (colour) THE WATER VOLE THE SEDGE-WARBLER THE RINGED PLOVER..

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FACING PACK

.64

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.6(5 .-68

.70 .7274 "6 78

... ... ........ ... ....

80

.82 .84 .8690

.9294

PREFACE

D

O

not go through the world blind to Nature's beauties or deaf to her music.

pleasure out of the place and count that the real test of ownership."

Even aand

little

Every intelligent and woman should learn toread something in the great wonder book of Nature, and thus add an incalculable pleasure to life. The world and all that is in it belongs only to thoseI was walking neighbourhood, and was met by a stranger who asked " To whom does this place belong ? " " To me," I replied. I suppose my sunbleached green tweed jacket and rough, muddy boots filled him with worldly " Inincredulity, for he exclaimed I thought it was owned by Sir deed So-and-So." "Yes," I answered, "he is the nominal owner, and takes the rent and the trouble, but I get all theit.

man

beasts, insects,

knowledge of birds, and flowers adds a great

unfailing joy to life, for they are constant friends, with an infinite variety of appeal to all that is sanest, healthiest,

and best

in

human

nature.

Take our

feathered friends as an example ; they charm us by their sweet songs, brilliantcolours, graceful movements, and interesting habits, yet never seem to grow stale or lose their sprightly youth. You

who enjoy

One day

across an estate in

my

:

may have

left

your old home

in

Devon-

Scotland, Wales, Ireor anywhere else, to dwell in the land, murk and gloom of some great city ;shire, Yorkshire,

:

and

if

you return again

ten, twenty, or

!

thirty years afterwards, you will find that, although the men and women youleft

behind have changed and grown

old, the birdsin

have not.

They show no

IV

KEARTONS' NATURE PICTURESalthough of secondary importance, be as accurate, informatory, andteresting aswillin-

change of colour, no weakening of voice, no lack of activity, or loss of beauty. Therein lies one of their greatest charms:

care

and experience can

they link you to your youth, revive your hope, and renew your capacity for healthy enjoyment. The present work has been prepared at the request of friends who have expressed a wish for Kearton pictures from Nature on a larger scale of reproduction,

make

it.

and

in order to give the

man

or

woman,

of the a bright and stimulating country-side glimpse of the wild creatures dwelling

boy

or

girl,

who knows but

little

therein.

As a gentleman the chair at one ofvery aptly put it its devotees have:

who

my "

recently took public lectures

The camera andthe

altered

whole

attitude of the public towards the subject, and to-day there is a demand for

accurate pictures and first-hand observation." Throughout the pages of this work no birds, beasts, system will be followed;

Familiar wild birds and beasts, seen almost daily round some British homestead or other, will find a place side by side with the very rarest feathered friends that visit our islands to breed. Bold Cock Robin will be figured together with the rare and gentle Red-Necked Phalarope, the cunning and wary Fox " earth," and the wee, sitting outside his the Ptarmigan timid Mouse at supper in the grey solitudes of her mistwreathed mountain home, and the Parthe noisy Oyster tridge in the hedge Catcher by the restless sea, and the the Skylark in the peaceful meadow gay Green Lizard and the sober-coloured Toad the Wood-Pigeon that coos softly in the copse, and the Owl that screeches the weirdly in the woods by night;; ; ;

;

sitting in stately grandeur on the topmost ledge of a towering maritime

Gannetcliff,

reptiles,

and

insects will jostle together

as they jostle in Nature's own domain. The reader may, therefore, dip into it here, there, or anywhere, and find some-

and the Ringed Plover that meekly runs upon the shingle below these, and many others, will be figured and:

described.

thing to interest or admire, just as he or she might do in a walk through the

along the seashore, or across lonely moor. First and foremost this is a picturebut the text, book, as its title implies

woods,

some

;

In short, it is confidently believed that the work will form the finest gallery of sun pictures of wild birds and beasts, taken amidst their natural surroundings, ever published in this or any other country. R> KEARTON>

'The male helps the female

to feed the

young ones."

THE STONECHATHE

T

of

an inhabitant and waste lands, where furze, heather, and brambles growStonechatis

rough commons

in tangled profusion.

The

a strikingly handsome bird. His sharply contrasted colours of black, white, and rusty brown, added to his fondness for perching on the topmost spray of any and every bush that comes

male

is

when compared with the Nightor the Blackcap, his excited ingale antics whilst delivering his short, sweet notes on the wing are sometimes very amusing. My friend Mr. Ussher has " very aptly described