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  • Home learning planning framework This is the plan for a learning sequence, and won’t take place within a single session

    Adapted from the EEF guidance report Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning

    Year group:10 Subject: English Literature

    Topic: A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Area: Introducing the contemporary production of the novella and exploring its overall structure

    Activate Prompting pupils to think about what they have learnt previously, that will help them with their next steps.

    1. Mind-map everything they know about Charles Dickens, Scrooge, A Christmas Carol and life in the Victorian era. 2. Read this online essay on ‘Dickens: ‘the man who invented Christmas’ here. Think about what are the modern ideas we associated with Christmas. For example, are there stereotypical beliefs, emotions, actions and/or rituals we associate with the Christmas holiday? 3. Research the adjective ‘Dickensian’ online. What further predictions does it help them make about Dickens’ ghost story? 4. Synthesise what they know about Dickens and A Christmas Carol and explain it in ‘just a minute’ to a parent or sibling at home.

    Explain Explicitly teaching strategies to pupils and helping them decide when to use them.

    1. Watch this video from the British Library about the origins of the novella here. Then summarise five key insights about the origins of Dickens’ novella. 2. Read this BBC Bitesize explanation of the structure of the novella here and create a diagram that visually maps the structure of the novella. 3. Consider how they will make notes as they read each stave of the novella. Watch this short video of the Cornell Note Making method here before reading stave 4. Find someone at home and try and use their notes to explain and review some of their key learning about the story so far.

    Practise Pupils practising strategies and skills repeatedly, to develop independence.

    1. Read the description of Scrooge from stave 1 that begins: “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster.” Write an extended written response to explain what Dickens conveys about the character of Scrooge in this initial introduction. Use their notes so far to make links to ideas about the Victorian age where appropriate.

    2. Read stave 1, completing their notes using the Cornell Method. 3. Read the BBC Bitesize description of the key characters from the novella. Can students add to their notes using these insights? 4. Select 10 key quotations for stave 1—students annotate them to record their key ideas.

    ���� Pupils reflecting on what they have learnt after they have completed a piece of work.

    1. Use their notes on stave 1 to provide a detailed verbal explanation of the key characters, plot details and language of the opening stave. Students may wish to record themselves on their phone, make flashcards, or find an audience who will listen to them at home.

    2. How does what students have read from stave 1 exemplify what they researched about the adjective ‘Dickensian’? Students write a paragraph explaining their answer.

    Review Revisiting previous learning after a gap.

    1. One week later, students mind-map what they can recall about the events, characters, language and context of stave 1, along with the overall narrative structure of the novella. If they have created flashcards, or an audio recording, they can test their knowledge using those tools.

    2. Two weeks later, students write an extended written response to the question: How does Dickens introduce the character of Scrooge to the reader in stave 1?’ They can only use their 10 key quotations in this response.

    Approach What is it? Examples (online / ����)—support students to:

    https://eef.li/metacognition http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/xmas/pva63.html https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-origins-of-a-christmas-carol https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zwkdwmn/revision/2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsR-10piMp4 Amy.Ellis-Thompson Cross-Out

  • Home learning planning framework This is the plan for a learning sequence, and won’t take place within a single session

    Adapted from the EEF guidance report Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning

    Year group: 3 Subject: English

    Topic: Spelling Area: Homophones

    Activate Prompting pupils to think about what they have learnt previously, that will help them with their next steps.

    1. Student to watch video and complete online quiz on BBC Bitesize: What are Homophones? 2. Student reads p.6 of the Year 3 EGPS Practice book — Choose the Correct Homophone — and recaps KS 1 examples. 3. They talk to an adult in their house to explain what a homophone is, including which ones they can use in their writing.

    Explain Explicitly teaching strategies to pupils and helping them decide when to use them.

    1. Student watches BBC Bitesize video explaining the use of further examples of homophones—BBC Bitesize English Appendix 1: Spelling (Year 3/4)—groan/grown, here/hear, heel/heal/he’ll, knot/not, mail/male, main/mane, meat/meet. They complete the quiz questions about when to use each of the homophones identified.

    2. Student reads page 7 of the EGPS Year 3 Practice workbook and answers the quiz section. 3. They talk to an adult about the new homophones they are learning about.

    Practise Pupils practising strategies and skills repeatedly, to develop independence.

    1. Student works through a series of guided examples and then completes homophones quiz on BBC Bitesize (Choose the correct homophone game) focusing on thought processes, decisions, and sources of help (e.g. vocabulary lists).

    2. Support students to complete a set of questions, starting with highly scaffolded questions, and ending with children working through the questions independently. 3. Student draws a series of illustrations showing the funny side of choosing the wrong homophone. 4. Student makes a poster to explain how to choose the correct homophone for someone in their house, showing and explaining the rules to them.

    ���� Pupils reflecting on what they have learnt after they have completed a piece of work.

    1. Student makes a PowerPoint showing what they know about homophones and the homophones they found trickier to learn, sharing with their teacher. 2. Student completes BBC Bitesize Homophones quiz. Prompt them to think about the questions they struggled with and what helped them to remember the correct ones to use. 3. Student completes 10 sentences, choosing correct homophones from the Year 3/4 spelling list. 4. Prompt students to summarise which homophones they found trickier/easier to use correctly. For example, ‘which strategies did you use to help you remember the tricky ones?’

    Encourage students to make a set of cards or a bookmark about how they helped themselves to remember and use these to help them in their writing.

    Review Revisiting previous learning after a gap.

    1. Two weeks after completing the work above, student revisits this topic using EGPS quick test. 2. Two weeks later, ask students to complete a set of practice questions on this from memory, then check and correct using printed answers.

    Approach What is it? Examples (online / ����)—support students to:

    https://eef.li/metacognition

  • Home learning planning framework This is the plan for a learning sequence, and won’t take place within a single session

    Adapted from the EEF guidance report Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning

    Year group: 8 Subject: Mathematics

    Topic: Algebra—Solving linear equations Area: Solving equations with unknowns on both sides

    Activate Prompting pupils to think about what they have learnt previously, that will help them with their next steps.

    1. Look at the annotated worked examples provided, recapping Year 7 work on collecting like terms and expanding brackets. 2. Watch the videos on collecting terms (here) and expanding brackets (here). 3. Complete the recap questions on both of the above topics [these are on Corbett Maths but could be printed]. 4. Look at the annotated worked examples provided recapping Year 7 work on solving linear equations. 5. Watch the video on solving linear equations (here), then self assess using the textbook exercise (worked answers provided).

    Explain Explicitly teaching strategies to pupils and helping them decide when to use them.

    1. Watch video 184 on Hegarty Maths (these are the most basic of this type of equation) and read the 3 annotated worked examples provided THEN do part (1) from the practice section.

    2. Watch video 185 on Hegarty Maths (these equations involve brackets) and read the 3 annotated worked examples provided THEN do part (2) from the practice section. 3. Study the four extra worked examples, and explain and annotate each step (what and why).

    Practise Pupils practising strategies and skills repeatedly, to develop independence.

    1. Complete task 184 on Hegarty Maths. Aim for a minimum of 80% correct answers—repeat if you get less than 80% (re-watch the video if you have to repeat more than once) THEN do part (2) from the Explain section.

    2. Complete task 185 on Hegarty Maths. Aim for a minimum of 80% correct answers—repeat if you get less than 80% (re-watch the video if you have to repeat more than once). 3. Complete a Seneca Learnin

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