Exploring The Cloud – A Global Study Of Government’S Adoption Of Cloud[1]

Download Exploring The Cloud – A Global Study Of Government’S Adoption Of Cloud[1]

Post on 12-Nov-2014

916 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

A Global Study Of GovernmentS Adoption Of Cloud This KPMG report produced in conjunction with Forbes Insights is based on the results of a survey of nearly 430 public sector executives on their expectations and strategies for cloud. It examines the impact of cloud on governments, public sector leaders and IT professionals. KPMG conducted the survey in 10 countries, including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, the UK, and the US, from February to May 2011. Additionally, a series of one-on-one interviews were conducted with a number of government leaders in these countries. The survey also covered 808 private sector executives.

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li> 1. GOVERNMENT Exploring the Cloud A Global Study of Governments Adoption of Cloud kpmg.com Cloud Innovation StorageCitizens Servers Network Risk mitigation Collaboration InformationTransformation Web-based Access Services Cost savings Efficiency Users SecurityOn-demand Applications Government Digital economy e-government Public Sector Data </li> <li> 2. b|Exploring the Cloud: A Global Study of Governments Adoption of Cloud Cloud is here. And as the accompanying research reveals, its promise is becoming real. 2012 KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. All rights reserved. </li> <li> 3. Exploring the Cloud: A Global Study of Governments Adoption of Cloud | 1 Foreword Cloud environments are already at work today reducing operating costs in some cases substantially. Such models are enabling optimization of asset utilization and flexibility in both the scale and scope of IT services and hardware. Less of a revolution, as the hype might suggest, and more of a long-anticipated next phase in the evolution of information technology (IT), nonetheless clouds arrival carries profound implications for IT provision for governments. The era of cloud will likely offer an array of ancillary benefits. For example, cloud is proving to be an engine of innovation. Many government agencies around the world are exploring a host of new services for, and interactions with, other groups within government as well as citizens. Further, as cloud reduces the footprint of IT operations, agencies are free to focus more on the effectiveness of their programs, and less on the management of IT. Of course, there are challenges such as data security and governance. But, according to this research, the experience of those moving forward with cloud has shown that such risks can be adequately addressed. In fact, it seems more likely that cloud will actually enhance data security. Other challenges range from a lack of government-specific applications to a dearth of investment capital. But again, those who participated in this research say such issues can easily be addressed and given the payoffs, must be overcome. The opportunity awaits, and for many the exploration has begun. This report is the third in a series on cloud from KPMG International, and seeks to offer guidance and insight to help those in the public sector get ready to move forward. To view the other KPMG cloud reports, please visit KPMG.com. Thank you to the many government officials around the world who gave generously of their time and insight as part of the research that provided the foundation for thispaper. John Herhalt Ken Cochrane Global Chair Partner KPMG Government &amp; Infrastructure KPMG in Canada KPMG International 2012 KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. All rights reserved. </li> <li> 4. 2012 KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. All rights reserved. </li> <li> 5. Table of contents Executive summary 4 Introduction: the evolution of cloud-enabled government 5 Governing from cloud 8 How the public sector is taking advantage of cloud technology8 Drivers of change9 Ensuring security and building trust 16 Unique challenges for the public sector18 A clear mandate: adopt cloud! 21 A world of progress21 Cases in point27 Adoption will come29 The transformation agenda 31 Creating a cloud-infused government 31 Driving innovation31 Getting there: six tips for creating traction 33 Conclusion37 Insights and implications 38 About the survey 42 Additional reading 43 2012 KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. Member firms of the KPMG network of independent firms are affiliated with KPMG International. KPMG International provides no client services. All rights reserved. </li> <li> 6. 4|Exploring the Cloud: A Global Study of Governments Adoption of Cloud Executive summary How are governments planning for and adopting cloud? What are the challenges of cloud-enablement? How will the integration of cloud technologies disrupt the status quo of governance? More importantly, what are governments doing to ensure they get the most from their cloud investments? These are just some of the questions that KPMG International hopes to answerwith this report. Working in conjunction with Forbes Insights, close to 430public-sector government executives from 10 countries were surveyed to learn more about their cloud strategies and expectations. Key findings are as follows: Government adoption of cloud is happening slowly, but is poised to accelerate: When it comes to exploring the opportunities of cloud, not surprisingly the public sector is well behind the private sector. Survey results find that the progress of government entities significantly lags that of their for-profit counterparts by 9 to 13 percent. Only 12 percent of government executives say that over 10 percent of their agencies overall annual IT resources are allocated to cloud in 2011. By the end of 2012, this figure is anticipated to more than double to 28 percent. Countries leading the way in cloud adoption are Australia, Italy and Denmark. The public sector has modest expectations of cloud: Only 50 percent of government respondents expect to gain some cost advantages with cloud; only 28 percent expect it to fundamentally change their model for operations; and just 39 percent expect it to change interaction with constituents. Security remains the biggest concern, but certification would help: Concern with security was cited by almost half of all government respondents (47 percent) as their most significant concern, only exceeding the private sector slightly at 44 percent. Among the largest government entity respondents of the survey, the figure rises to 56 percent, the highest level of concern cited by any group. However, almost 80 percent said they would be more confident if cloud...</li></ul>