Engaging Students with Inquiry

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Presentation for Baptist College of Health Science by Dr. Michael M. Grant. Focuses on problem-based and project-based learning.

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  • 1.Engaging Students with Inquiry Strategies for Effective Teaching & Engaging Students

2. MichaelM.Grant Instruc(onalDesign&Technology h5p://viral-notebook.com mgrant2@memphis.edu @michaelmgrant Michael M. Grant 2012 3. http://ijpbl.org Michael M. Grant 2012 4. Agenda How learning occurs Problem-based learning " & examples Project-based learning " & examples Engaging strategies online " & on ground 5. How does learning occur? 6. Cognitive Learning 7. Cognitive Load 8. Constructivist Learning 9. Assimilation v. Accommodation 10. Who likes learning new stuff? 11. Who likes going school? 12. Weve got to change that! Its up to me & you! 13. Authen(cLearning Ar(cial Realworldrelevance SituatedCogni(on CraIAppren(ceships Problem-basedLearning Project-basedLearning Cogni(veFlexibilityTheory DirectInstruc(on Cases/CaseStudies 14. Authen(cLearning Ar(cial Realworldrelevance SituatedCogni(on CraIAppren(ceships Cogni(veFlexibilityTheory DirectInstruc(on Cases/CaseStudies Problem-basedLearning Project-basedLearning 15. Problem-based Learning 1. Students must have the responsibility for their own learning. 2. The problem simulations used in problem-based learning must be ill-structured and allow for free inquiry. 3. Learning should be integrated from a wide range of disciplines or subjects. 4. Collaboration is essential. 5. What students learn during their self-directed learning must be applied back to the problem with reanalysis and resolution. 6. A closing analysis of what has been learned from work with the problem and a discussion of what concepts and principles have been learned is essential. 7. Self and peer assessment should be carried out at the completion of each problem and at the end of every curricular unit. 8. The activities carried out in problem-based learning must be those valued in the real world. 9. Student examinations must measure student progress towards the goals of problem- based learning. 10. Problem-based learning must be the pedagogical base in the curriculum and not part of a didactic curriculum. 16. The PBL Learning Process Learners encounter a problem and attempt to solve it with information they already possess, allowing them to appreciate what they already know. They also identify what they need to learn to better understand the problem and how to resolve it. Once they have worked with the problem as far as possible and identied what they need to learn, the learners engage in self-directed study to research the information needed, nding and using a variety of information resources. 17. The PBL Learning Processcontd The learners then return to the problem and apply what they learned to their work with the problem in order to more fully understand and resolve the problem. This process is iterative until the problem is resolved. After they have nished their problem work, the learners assess themselves and each other to develop skills in self-assessment and the constructive assessment of peers. 18. The PBL Learning Processcontd The learners then return to the problem and apply what they learned to their work with the problem in order to more fully understand and resolve the problem. This process is iterative until the problem is resolved. After they have nished their problem work, the learners assess themselves and each other to develop skills in self-assessment and the constructive assessment of peers.PBL Tutorial 19. A more accurate title might be" SPBIICRL 20. A more accurate title might be" student-centered, problem- based, inquiry-based, integrated, collaborative, reiterative learning. SPBIICRL But thats not as sexy. 21. Some Examples 22. Math & Environmental Science: ! We Need Trees We need the trees Scene One" https://docs.google.com/document/pub?id=1OP- kYkWquyMT5Kfb-k74Cu9bmvK0FwoopU0Mbw-jQ5w We need the trees Scene Two" https://docs.google.com/document/pub? id=11f9nmQmUAF8QIkU2K6uzE3tALPF0i1We6CaJZDzGnOk 23. Genetics & Math: ! Wondering about Via, too? Overview Scene 1 Scene 2 Scene 3 Scene 4 Learning Grid 24. ijpbl.org 25. Analyzing the PBL Approach 1. What is the product or artifact of learning? Can you hold it? 2. Is the product or artifact of learning the same for everyone? 3. Does the instructional model provide steps/guides for the elements of instruction. 4. How is it assessed? 5. Why would you do it? 26. PBL Problems The problems used are ill-structured, messy problems like those the learner will encounter in the real world. The learning process requires the skills expected of learners when the encounter problems in their lives and careers. 27. Generating the Problem The problem must be authentic. The problem has one or more solutions with one or more pathways to the outcome. Initial presentation of the problem should provide minimal information requiring the problem solver to formulate requests for vital information. Information should be available upon request or by progressive disclosure. Expert review of the case will anticipate the problem solving process and needed information. Expert review will predict some alternative pathways and non-productive pathways. 28. Generating the Problem 1. What is the desired outcome? 2. What is the plan that would address the desired outcome? 3. What is the problem solution(s) that would generate the plan? 4. What key pieces of information would lead to the solution(s)? 6. What key pieces of information might be external to the solution, but related? 7. What pieces of information might be requested but irrelevant? 8. How does the problem present? 9. What are the cues/clues that need to be included to prompt problem solving? 29. Teacher Role Facilitator, guide on the side, coach, model, scaffold Will not align with everyones epistemology. Pitfalls? 30. Assessment in PBL Who? What? When? How? 31. Elements to consider when planning for PBL 32. Blooms Taxonomy Evalua(on Synthesis Analysis Applica(on Comprehension Knowledge Lower Order Thinking Skills (LOTS) Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) 33. CourseEmbed 1(me Wholecourse Acrosscourses Collabora(on None/minimal Essen(al Ambiguity Low High Solu(ons Single Mul(ple ProblemSolving Singlepaths Mul(plepaths Diculty Applica(on Analysis Evalua(onSynthesis 34. Expert/teacherrole Direc(ve Facilita(ve AssessmentAr(facts Product Process Mul(ple AssessmentPerspec(ves Single/Instructor Mul(ple Authen(city Ar(cial Realworldrelevance Resources Justincase Justin(me Instruc(onalPurpose ProblemIden(ca(on ProblemSolving Both 35. Goal-based Scenarios Target skills have been identied for the learners. Mission refers to the primary goal that the learner pursues within the scenario. Mission focus determines the class of task the learner will accomplish (i.e., Design, Diagnosis, Discovery, Control). Cover story refers to the premise designed by the instructor under which the mission will be pursued. Operations are the specic activities (tasks) learners will go through to learn the target skills in the mission. 36. Components of Projects 1.Production of a learning artifact 2.An introduction, emotional anchor, or mission 3.Driving question 4.Definition of the learning task 5.Procedure for investigation 6.Suggested resources 7.Scaffolding 8.Collaborations 9.Reflections &transfer activities 37. (cc)2013MichaelM.Grant| Directions 1.Choose a topic. Hands-on: Developing Driving Questions practice 38. (cc)2013MichaelM.Grant| Directions 1.Choose a topic. 2.Think about where or how that knowledge or skill is used in the real world and would matter to your students. Hands-on: Developing Driving Questions practice 39. (cc)2013MichaelM.Grant| Directions 1.Choose a topic. 2.Think about where or how that knowledge or skill is used in the real world and would matter to your students. 3.Break out the Tubric. Hands-on: Developing Driving Questions practice 40. http://tubric.com 41. http://tubric.com 42. (cc)2013MichaelM.Grant| Directions 1.Choose a topic. 2.Think about where or how that knowledge or skill is used in the real world and would matter to your students. 3.Break out the Tubric. 4.Translate your knowledge/skill with your context into a driving question. Hands-on: Developing Driving Questions practice 43. (cc)2013MichaelM.Grant| Directions 1.Choose a topic. 2.Think about where or how that knowledge or skill is used in the real world and would matter to your students. 3.Break out the Tubric. 4.Translate your knowledge/skill with your context into a driving question. 5.Try 2-3 questions to see which one is the best. Hands-on: Developing Driving Questions practice 44. COMPONENTS OF PROJECTS 45. Projects require a task or series of tasks. 46. Students follow a process or investigation to complete task(s) and produce artifact. Project are not recipes. 47. Project task(s) afford multiple paths to completion and learning. 48. Students should have choice in the topic(s) and/or process of investigation. 49. Scaffolds help students perform at a higher level with project tasks. 50. Resources are evaluated and synthesized to produce artifact(s). 51. Collaborations allows students to negotiate content and receive feedback. 52. Assessment encompasses process and product. 53. Artifacts afford multiple representations of knowledge. Projects are not recipes. 54. Projects should encourage students to at least apply knowledge. 55. Blooms Taxonomy Evalua(on Synthesis Analysis Applica(on Comprehension Knowledge Lower Order Thinking Skills (LOTS) Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) 56. It is practically impossible for an artifact to represent all that has been learned. 57. How Teachers Use Project-based Learning Reinforcer Extender Initiator Navigator 58. FACTORS THAT WILL INFLUENCE THE SUCCESS OF PBL FOR FACULTY & LEARNERS 59. Teachers and students must recognize and accept their roles in project-based learning. 60. Teachers and students must be comfortable with the physical messiness of project-based learning. 61. Teachers and students must have a tolerance for ambiguity in project-based learning. 62. Project-based learning must be integrated with the reality outside a teachers classroom. 63. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. Michael M. Grant, PhD 2013