Drawing Stories from around the World and a Sampling of European Handkerchief Stories

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<ul><li><p>Drawing Storiesfrom Around the World</p><p>and a Samplingof European</p><p>Handkerchief Stories</p><p>Anne Pellowski</p><p>LIBRARIES UNLIMITED</p></li><li><p>Drawing Sto ries from Around the Worldand a Sam pling of Eu ropean Hand kerchief Sto ries</p></li><li><p>Draw ing Sto ries from Around the World</p><p> and a Sam pling of European Hand kerchief Sto ries</p><p>Anne Pellowski</p><p>Westport, Connecticut Lon don</p></li><li><p>Brit ish Li brary Cat a logu ing in Pub li ca tion Data is avail able.</p><p>Copyright 2005 by Li braries Un limited</p><p>All rights re served. No por tion of this book may be reproduced, by any pro cess or tech nique, with out theexpress written con sent of the pub lisher.</p><p>ISBN: 1-59158-222-9</p><p>First pub lished in 2005</p><p>Libraries Un limited, 88 Post Road West, Westport, CT 06881A Mem ber of the Green wood Pub lishing Group, Inc.www.lu.com</p><p>Printed in the United States of Amer ica</p><p>The pa per used in this book com plies with the Permanent Pa per Stan dard is sued by the Na tionalIn for ma tion Stan dards Or ga ni za tion (Z39.481984).</p><p>10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1</p></li><li><p>Con tents</p><p>Ac knowl edg ments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viiAb bre vi a tions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix</p><p>Drawing Stories from Around the World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1In tro duc tion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1A Note on Draw ing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7For Those Who Feel They Can not Draw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8</p><p>The Black CatNineteenth-Century American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9The Wolves, the Goats and the KidsNineteenth-Century</p><p>Amer i can, Eu ro pean, Mon go lian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19The Smart Shop perRo ma nian, Greek, Arme nian . . . . . . . . . . 25The Smart ShopperSwiss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31What Do You Think You Are?German, Swiss . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37The KeyDan ish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43Pers Trou sersSwed ish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49Light BulbSwedish, American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57How to Get Rid of MosquitosParaguayan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63Lit tle Cir cle, Big Cir cleIn do ne sian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69Good Night!Ma lay sian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75Right An swer, Wrong An swerMa lay sian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81Right An swer, Wrong An swer (Sec ond Ver sion)Ma lay sian . . . . 84The Doh BirdBen gali . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87How Man and Woman Found Their Place in the </p><p> WorldChinese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91The Ab sent-Minded JudgeKorean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95EKAKI UTAJap a nese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98</p><p>The Care free Girls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99Is It Grand father? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103Shall I Draw Your Portrait? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107To Help You Feel Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111The Oc to pus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115The One That Got Away . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119The Duck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125What Hap pened af ter the Rain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129Panda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135</p><p>v</p></li><li><p>The Cheer leader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139Ci cada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145Watch Out! Youll Turn into a Frog!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149Cat er pil lar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153Santa Claus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157The Badger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163</p><p>SAND STORIESAus tra lian Ab orig ine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167The Rain bow SnakeAus tra lian Ab orig ine . . . . . . . . . . . 169Little Boy and EmuNunggubuyu (Aus tra lian Ab orig ine)185</p><p>The Lit tle Girl and Her Grand motherNapaskiak,Yuk (Es kimo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193</p><p>What Can Happen If You Fall into a HoleSouth Af rica . . . . . 203</p><p>Hand ker chief Sto ries from Eu ro pean Traditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207In tro duc tion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207</p><p>The Puz zled Pro fes sorsDutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211Rab bit StoryEu ro pean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213The Jump ing MouseEu ro pean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219The Baby Sur priseEu ro pean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227The Peas ants Clever Daugh terEu ro pean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233</p><p>Sources of the Draw ing Sto ries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243The Black Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243The Wolves, the Goats and the Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243The Smart Shop per . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243The Smart Shop perSwiss and Ger man Ver sions . . . . . 244What Do You Think You Are?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244The Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244Pers Trou sers; Light Bulb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244How to Get Rid of Mosquitos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245Little Circle, Big Cir cle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245Good Night!; Right Answer, Wrong An swer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246The Doh Bird. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246How Man and Woman Found Their Place in the World . . . 246The Ab sent-Minded Judge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247Ekaki Uta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247The Rainbow Snake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247Little Boy and Emu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248The Lit tle Girl and Her Grand mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248What Can Happen If You Fall into a Hole. . . . . . . . . . . . . 248</p><p>Sources of the Handkerchief Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249Bib li og ra phy for Draw ing Sto ries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251Bib li og ra phy for Hand ker chief Sto ries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255In dex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257</p><p>vi Con tents</p></li><li><p>Ac knowl edg ments</p><p>My warm est thanks to Shigeo Watanable, Sachiko SaionjiWatanabe, Kiyoko Matsuoka, Tadashi Matsui, and the late KazueIshitake, all of Ja pan. They have been su premely helpful in di rectingme to many of my drawing sto ries and giving me good clues so that Icould trans late the sto ries into Eng lish with out distorting them toomuch. All er rors of interpretation are mine.</p><p>Grateful thanks are also due to Devon Harle and RobinYoungerman, ref er ence li brar i ans at the Winona Pub lic Li brary (Min-nesota), for their help in getting items for me on interlibrary loans. Ihad first read many of these items at the New York Pub lic Li brary.They were rare and of ten hard to lo cate, but I needed to check themagain firsthand, for the bibliography. What other author has had thedelightful mo ment of hearing on the an swering ma chine, We haveHanky Panky for you at the library?</p><p>I also wish to thank the following, whom I list in alphabetical or-der, by coun try:</p><p>Mrs. Shpresa Vreto of Albania; the late Jack Da vis and the lateEna Noel and all my IBBY friends in Australia; Angela Evdoxiadis and Ruth Brown of Toronto, Can ada; Knud-Eigil Hauberg-Tychssen ofDen mark; Genevieve Patte of France; the Baumann Family, BarbaraScharioth, Klaus Doderer, and the late Hans Halbey, all of Ger many;Bandana Sen of New Delhi, In dia; Murti Bunanta, Toety Maklis, andIka Sri Mustika of In do ne sia; Nouchine Ansari and all my friends atthe Chil drens Book Council of Iran; the staff at the Folklore Section,Se oul Uni ver sity, Ko rea; Julinda Abu-Nasr of Lebanon; AhmedGhulam Jamaludin, Asmiah Abd. Ghani, Hasniah bt. Husin, ShamsulKhamariah and all my friends at the Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka,Kuala Lumpur, Ma laysia; Joke Thiel-Schoonebeck, Ce cile Beijk vanDaal, and Rian van de Sande of the Neth erlands; Irene Kulman of Par -aguay; Sra. Lilly de Cueto of Peru; Kiran Shah, Sheila Wee and mem -bers of the Sto rytelling Group, and mem bers of the BookDe vel op ment Coun cil, Sin ga pore; Eva Eriksson, Ulla Lundberg, and</p><p>vii</p></li><li><p>Per Gustavsson of Swe den; Susanne Stocklin-Meier and the late Elisa-beth Waldmann of Swit zerland; Somboon Singkamanen of Thailand;Vir ginia Betancourt, Carmen Diana Dearden, and many other friendsin Ven ezuela who looked in vain for drawing stories.</p><p>In the United States: Ginny Moore Kruse, Kathleen Horning, andNancy Gloe of Madison, Wisconsin; Cara Olson Kolb and Sam Kolb ofMinnesota and California (for their help while with the Peace Corps in Par a guay); Mar i lyn Iarusso of New York; Nancy D. Munn of Chi cago,Il li nois; Vic tor Mair, Uni ver sity of Penn syl va nia; and Mar ga ret ReadMacDonald of Seattle, Washington.</p><p>viii Ac knowl edg ments</p></li><li><p>Ab bre vi a tions</p><p>IBBYThe In ternational Board on Books for Young People.This is the or ganization through which I have mademany of my best con tacts in the field of sto rytelling. Ithas na tional sec tions in more than sixty countries andhas its secretariat in Basel, Switzerland.</p><p>USBBYThe U.S. Board on Books for Young Peo ple, the of -fi cial na tional sec tion of IBBY.</p><p>ix</p></li><li><p> Draw ing Sto ries fromAround the World</p><p>In tro duc tion</p><p>In us ing the term draw ing sto ries, I am re ferring to those storiesin which the teller (or an assistant) actually draws a figure or figureswhile nar rating the story. I do not re fer to sto ries in which the fig uresor pictures are drawn in ad vance, and the teller then points to themwhile narrating.</p><p>We do not know when draw ing sto ries began. There is some ev i-dence that parts of early cave draw ings match com monly knownmyths and legends in a given area (for ex ample, Australia and south -ern Af rica), but we can only spec ulate whether the draw ings weremade dur ing the tell ing of a tale, or be fore or af ter. Most of thesketches in drawing sto ries from the last 150 years are quite ephem -eral, be ing erased or thrown away shortly after the telling oc curs. Thismakes them very difficult to research.</p><p>I first became in terested in draw ing sto ries (and indeed, any un -usual forms of storytelling) as a li brarian and storyteller at the NewYork Public Li brary in the late 1950s and early 1960s. This in terest wasstimulated by Chap ter 38 in Laura Ingalls Wilders book On the Banksof Plum Creek and by the appearance of such books as Carl With erssThe Tale of a Black Cat. I also saw how the draw ing-story books andfilms of Crockett John son (Harold and the Purple Crayon and oth ers)had taken hold of the young childs imag ination in that same pe riodand for that matter still do.</p><p>During my first ex tended visit to Ja pan, in 1972, I came upon anumber of children drawing and chanting ekaki uta. Thanks to myguide, Sachiko Saionji (now Watanabe), I was in troduced to this fas ci-nating aspect of Japanese chil drens cul ture. It is dif ficult to remembernow, but she, the late Mitsue Ishitake (founder of the Ohanashi Car a-van), or the writer Shigeo Watanabe, sent me the first book in which I</p><p>1</p></li><li><p>saw this custom doc umented: Satoshi Kakos Nihon Densho No AsobiTokumon (Jap a nese Tra di tional Games). Later, Tadashi Matsui, ofFukuinkan Pub lish ers, and Kiyoko Matsuoka, ac tive in the Asian Cul-tural Center for UNESCO, called my attention to var ious pub licationsand re cord ings where ekaki uta were to be found. I owe a debt to all ofthem, be cause ekaki uta, and my first at tempts at us ing them in Eng -lish, piqued my in terest enough to search for drawing stories in otherparts of the world.</p><p>The draw ing sto ry tell ing prac ticed by the Aus tra lian Ab orig i nesis surely among the older forms, since it is mentioned by early vis itorsto the con tinent. Also, the pictures found in caves re veal that the mo -tifs and se quences de picted show a re markable similarity to the draw-ings used in sto ries told in the past century. Sadly, most folklorists andanthropologists seem to re gard this activity as merely a game prac -ticed by children, and only a few of them have given it the se rious andcareful study it deserves.</p><p>The mo tifs and de signs used in such sand storytelling are alsoused by many se rious artists, some times us ing ac tual sand on bark orother types of pa per. They can also be found in drawings and paint-ings using other art me dia, such as pen and ink, wa tercolor, tempera,oil, and the like. The designs have also been used in film. But in vir tu-ally all of these cases, little or no men tion is made of the use instorytelling.</p><p>More scholars have studied the storyknifing com mon amongthe Napaskiak, Yupik, and other groups in Alaska and the area onboth sides of the Be ring Strait. Storyknifing is generally practicedmostly by chil dren and women. One of the first toys given to chil drenin the past was a beautifully carved bone knife (not sharp) used ex clu-sively for this ac tivity. These storyknives are now col lectors items andcarry a hefty price. Now adays, or dinary ta ble knives of metal orplastic are used.</p><p>As soon as the chil dren are old enough to ver balize simple narra-tives, they draw se quential figures in snow, sand, or mud while tellinga tale that matches the pic tures. This is the process called storyknifing.According to all the scholars who have studied this ac tivity, the typi-cal commencement for such a session is for one child to suggest to an-other, Lets go storyknifing, and they troop out to a space wherethere is a fresh layer of snow or a nice smooth area of mud or sand. The stories are of the type commonly known as personal experience nar-ratives, or they are mod eled on tra ditional folk tales known among thechildren. The tell ers often change the details to match their specific life situations. Boys gene...</p></li></ul>

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