dr. marinak presentation penn state york

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  • 1. Barbara A. Marinak, PhD Mount St. Marys University The Rest of the Story Informational Text in the Age of the Common Core State Standards

2. Quiz Time!! 3. #1 Spiders can tune their webs. 4. #2 The bones of an African slave hung in a Connecticut museum for more than 80 years. 5. +3 The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is endangered due to logging. 6. +4 A gel developed for a dolphin is now widely used to ease the pain of prosthetic limbs. 7. +5 Curiosity, the Mars rover, tweets. 8. #1 Spiders can tune their webs. TRUE Spiders can tighten or loosen their silk strands to alter the way each string resonates. 9. #2 The bones of an African American slave hung in a Connecticut museum for 80 years. TRUE The bones of Fortune hung in the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, CT from 1933 to 2013. 10. +3 The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is endangered due to logging. FALSE 11. +4 A gel developed for a dolphin is now widely used to ease the pain of prosthetic limbs. TRUE Winter's Gel, developed for the dolphin Winter, is a soft rubbery sock material that reduces the pain and skin friction of prosthetics. 12. +5 Curiosity, the Mars rover, tweets. TRUE Runnin' Down a Dream: I'm healthy & heading West. Latest pics from travels on Mars. May 30 13. Curiosity Tweets Mohawk Guy aka Bobak Ferdowsi NASA engineer and flight director Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Mission 14. Truth is often strangermore compellingmore interesting than fiction! 15. Why Informational Text? Four compelling reasons to teach with and about informational text include: gains in reading comprehension for both proficient and at-risk readers. growth in vocabulary and the ability to transfer knowledge to new learning demands. enhanced motivation to read. Motivation matters! Motivation will be included in the reauthorization of new federal legislation. (Duke, 2000; Duke & Pearson, 2002; Hall, Sabey & McClellan, 2005; Williams, Hall, & Lauer, 2004) 16. Fourth Reason 17. CCSS Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. 18. CCSS Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. 19. CCSS Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. 20. Informational Text Imperative Significantly increase the amount of informational text students access Increase the diversity of informational text--- informational books, periodicals, newspapers, web content, videos, podcasts, etc. Select mentor texts that support multiple core standards Teach informational text using high impact methods 21. Rigor Imperative Increase amount and variety of text students consume- including independent reading Connect every book students read to at least 2 additional pieces of text 22. Rigor Imperative Reduce frontloading/pausing and increase searching, reading, and representing Rigor length 23. Teaching with Informational Text Text Structures versus Features Structure versus Strategy Graphic Organizers Questioning Increase Amount of Informational Reading 24. Text Features versus Text Structures 25. Text Features Features = Formatting Black and white space organization color, chapters, headings, subheading, sidebars, questions, font, boldface, italics, color, TOC, glossary Can support or erode comprehension 26. Text Structures A text structure is the manner in which major ideas and supporting details are organized in an informational text. The content being presented and authors purpose determine how the writer organizes the concepts and ideas. Enumeration Time Order Compare & Contrast* Problem Solution Cause & Effect 27. Text Structures Authors of authentic informational text do not write to a particular structure. Text structures are instruction we overlay to enhance comprehension. 28. Structure versus Strategy Time Order Structure Compare/Contrast Strategy 29. Structure versus Strategy Time Order Structure Compare/Contrast Strategy 30. Knowledge of Content Graphic Organizers A small cadre of graphic organizers and/or text maps should be used carefully Should be discipline-specific Should always be purposefuldiscussion, writing, etc. 31. Text Map Compare and Contrast 32. We can compare and contrast giraffes and Emperor penguins. Giraffes live in Africa but Emperor penguins live in Antarctica. Giraffes have live births. Emperor penguins lay eggs. Both giraffes and Emperor penguins have one baby at a time. Giraffes and Emperor penguins are similar in how they protect their young. These two animals place their babies in kindergartens. Compare/Contrast Summary 33. Compare/Contrast Giraffe Emperor Penguin Supporting Details Attributes Supporting Details Africa Live Antarctica One Number of Babies One Live Type of Birth Egg Kindergarten Protection of Young Kindergarten 34. We can compare and contrast giraffes and Emperor penguins. Giraffes live in Africa but Emperor penguins live in Antarctica. Giraffes have live births. Emperor penguins lay eggs. Both giraffes and Emperor penguins have one baby at a time. Giraffes and Emperor penguins are similar in how they protect their young. These two animals place their babies in kindergartens. Compare/Contrast Summary 35. Questioning 36. Questions??? 37. Questions??? 38. Learn More Core +2 39. Core Fortunes Bones 40. +2 http://www.fortunestory.org/fortune/who.asp http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/28/fortunes-bo 41. Winters Tail 42. +2or more! http://www.seewinter.com/winter/winters_story/win http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=winter's+tail& http://www.hanger.com/prosthetics/experience/patie 43. The Adventures of Sojourner 44. +2 45. Multiple Sources 46. Nubs on Facebook 47. Teachers Reading Log Teachers Reading Log invites readers into your thinking about text. Maintaining a teachers reading log makes your metacognition public and allows you to model the wide variety of ways we respond to text. 48. Tornadoes by Seymour Simon This book is fascinating and frightening at the same time. I learned from Tornadoes that the United States has had two F5 tornadoes. One was in Missouri in 1925 and the other was in Texas in 1997. However, Tornadoes was published in 1999. I learned from weather.com that since 1999, the U.S. has had another F5 tornado. In 2011, an F5 tornado hit Joplin, Missouri. 49. Good teaching is forever being on the cutting edge of a childs competence. Jerome Bruner 50. Break Out Session Possibilities +2 Text Impression Q-Matrix 51. Text Impression Antarctic 52. Text Impression Antarctic African 53. Text Impression Antarctic African one 54. Text Impression Antarctic African one rookery 55. Text Impression Antarctic African one rookery herd 56. Group on land is a waddle or colony Nesting group is a rookery A group of babies is a crche A group in the water is a raft 57. Text Impression Antarctic African one rookery herd kindergarten 58. Q-Matrix Literal 1. What is? What are? 2. Where/When is? Where/When are? 3. Which is? Which are? 4. Who is? Who are? 5. Why is? Why are? 6. How is? How are? 7. What do? What does? What did? 8. Where/When do? Where/When does? Where/When did? 9. Which do? Which does? Which did? 10. Who do? Who does? Who did? 11. Why do? Why does? Why did? 12. How do? How does? How did? Inferential 13. What can? 14. Where/When can? 15. Which can? 16. Who can? 17. Why can? Why cant? 18. How can? 19. What could? 20. Where/When would? 21. Which would? 22. Who would? 23. Why would? 24. How would? Extended 25. What will? 26. Where/When will? 27. Which will? 28. Who will? 29. Why will? 30. How will? 31. What might? 32. Where/When might? 33. Which might? 34. Who might? 35. Why might? 36. How might? 59. Q-Matrix TEXT + me = literal (stems 1-12) Text + Me = inferential (stems 13-24) text + ME = extended (stems 25-36) 60. Q-Matrix Literal 1. What is? What are? 2. Where/When is? Where/When are? 3. Which is? Which are? 4. Who is? Who are? 5. Why is? Why are? 6. How is? How are? 7. What do? What does? What did? 8. Where/When do? Where/When does? Where/When did? 9. Which do? Which does? Which did? 10. Who do? Who does? Who did? 11. Why do? Why does? Why did? 12. How do? How does? How did? 61. Q-Matrix Inferential 13. What can? 14. Where/When can? 15. Which can? 16. Who can? 17. Why can? Why cant? 18. How can? 19. What could? 20. Where/When would? 21. Which would? 22. Who would? 23. Why would? 24. How would? 62. Q-Matrix Extended 25. What will? 26. Where/When will? 27. Which will? 28. Who will? 29. Why will? 30. How will? 31. What might? 32. Where/When might? 33. Which might? 34. Who might? 35. Why might? 36. How might? 63. TEXT + me = literal How long do penguin chicks stay in a kindergarten? How old is a giraffe calf when it enters a kindergarten? 64. Text + Me = inferential When would penguins and giraffes form kindergartens? 65. text + ME = extended Giraffes and penguins use kindergartens to protect their young. What might other animals do to protect their babies?