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JOBPOSTINGS.CA SEPTEMBER 2014 / INSIDE THIS ISSUE 3 - 2 - 1 ... BLAST OFF! Starting a business can be tough, but these talented young people are making it work, despite their disabilities. ACHIEVING GOLD | FUNDING FOR EVERYONE | GOING ABROAD | INVESTMENT IN DISABILITIES STAR TUPS

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The 2014 issue of (dis)ability addresses career-related issues unique to students and recent grads with disabilities.

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  • JOBPOSTINGS.CA

    SEPTEMBER 2014 / INSIDE THIS ISSUE

    3 - 2 - 1 ... BLAST OFF!Starting a business can be tough,

    but these talented young people are making it work, despite their disabilities.

    ACHIEVING GOLD | FUNDING FOR EVERYONE | GOING ABROAD | INVESTMENT IN DISABILITIESST

    ART

    UPS

  • 2014 Target Brands, Inc. Target and the Bullseye Design are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc.

    target.ca/careersAPPLY TODAY

    OF COURSE

    MY FOLLOWERS THINK SO

    THINK YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A LEADER?

    EXPAND YOURSOCIAL NETWORKAND WORK WITH OURAWESOME TEAM

    GreatPeopleAlways

    GPA IS IMPORTANTTO US TOO

    Hellosuccessful

    career!

    Ready for your first career? We found it.

    GO FROMMANAGINGYOUR ONLINEFRIENDS

    to managinga top brand

    AND WEHAVE JOBS FOR PEOPLE

    JUST LIKE YOU

    #YOLO!

    WE WANT THE

    AND YOURE AT THETOP OF THE CLASS

    best & brightest

    JOIN OUR TEAM.EXPECT THE BEST.

    140812 Target Job Postings Campus.indd 1 8/13/14 10:26 AM

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    2014 Target Brands, Inc. Target and the Bullseye Design are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc.

    target.ca/careersAPPLY TODAY

    OF COURSE

    MY FOLLOWERS THINK SO

    THINK YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A LEADER?

    EXPAND YOURSOCIAL NETWORKAND WORK WITH OURAWESOME TEAM

    GreatPeopleAlways

    GPA IS IMPORTANTTO US TOO

    Hellosuccessful

    career!

    Ready for your first career? We found it.

    GO FROMMANAGINGYOUR ONLINEFRIENDS

    to managinga top brand

    AND WEHAVE JOBS FOR PEOPLE

    JUST LIKE YOU

    #YOLO!

    WE WANT THE

    AND YOURE AT THETOP OF THE CLASS

    best & brightest

    JOIN OUR TEAM.EXPECT THE BEST.

    140812 Target Job Postings Campus.indd 1 8/13/14 10:26 AM

    01

    20RESOURCES06 GETTIN OUTTA HERE Going abroad is certainly more of a challenge for people with disabilities, but with organization, research, and motivation, anything is possible.

    09 INVESTMENT IN DISABILITIES The Canadian government is invest-ing time and money into programs for all people. Find out how you can benefit!

    13 ExTRA FUNDING The National Educational Associa-tion of Disabled Students offers all kinds of resources, including a num-ber of scholarships each year. We talk to an award winner to find out how this funding positively impacted her education and career.

    SUpERSTARS16 ACHIEVING GOLD Paralympic swimmer Benot Huot is making a splashnot only win-ning 19 medals, but also running a foundation to help up-and-coming disabled athletes. Read on for his remarkable story.

    FEATURES20 STARTING Up wITH NO LIMITS Just because someone has a disability doesnt mean they lack talent or am-bition. Jennifer, Keith, and Maayan are three entrepreneurs that are fighting to make their career dreams come true, despite the odds.

    09

    THE FRONT PAGESTABLE OF CONTENTS

    06

    16

  • Be YourselfWe recognize colleague diversity as a source of national pride and strength.

    Apply todayLoblaw.ca/careers

    facebook.com/[email protected]

    FRESH FUTUREFIND OUT WHERE YOUR

    CAREER CAN TAKE YOU

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    03

    THE FRONT PAGES

    EDITOR | JAMES MICHAEL MCDONALD [email protected] @mcjamdonald

    ART DIRECTOR | ANTHONY CApANO [email protected]

    STAFF wRITER | MEGAN SANTOS [email protected] @megnifisantos

    pUBLISHER | NATHAN LAURIE [email protected]

    ASSOCIATE pUBLISHER | MARK LAURIE [email protected]

    COMMUNICATIONS AND pROJECT MANAGER | DAVID TAL

    [email protected] @davidtalwrites

    COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR | JAMIE BERTOLINI

    [email protected]

    DEVELOpER | MISHRAz AHMAD BHOUNR

    [email protected]

    SENIOR NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER | MARY VANDERpAS [email protected]

    EDUCATION ACCOUNT MANAGER | SHANNON TRACEY

    [email protected]

    NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER | MIRELLE SHIMONOV

    [email protected]

    CONTRIBUTORS: Kate aenlle, mehreen Shahid

    photos from thinkstock.com are used throughout this issue; individual artists have been credited. Cover illustration: marvid, anthony Capano

    Jobpostings publishes its (dis)ability issue annually. it is distributed to over 105 universities and colleges in Canada. Contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may not be reprinted in whole or part without permission of the publishers.

    a hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles. Christopher reeve

    CONTACT: 25 imperial Street, Suite 100 toronto, On m5p 1b9 | jobpostings.ca | 416.932.8866 ext. 221 | [email protected]

    MASTHEAD | AD INDEX

    SCHOOL INDEx12 Cambrian College

    wHOS HIRINGIFC target

    02 loblaw

    04 td bank

    08 Farm Credit Canada

    08 imperial

    11 FintraC

    11 Saskpower

    11 Futurpreneur

    19 bdO Canada llp

    OBC the home depot

    GENERAL ADS15 neadS

    IBC Canadas luckiest Student

  • Achieve your full potential. At TD, we recognize your ability and provide a work environment that exceeds your expectations.

    Discover why TD is an extraordinary place to work, with a unique and inclusive culture.

    Visit TD.com/careers, create your profile, and apply today!

    Well give you more ways to make an impact.

    Discover the possibilities at TD.

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    05

    EDITORS NOTE THE FRONT PAGES

    pUSH YOUR LIMITS We all face challenges. There are plenty of typical ob-stacles: getting good grades, finding the right job, dealing with difficult coworkers, even making the perfect omelette! Unfortunately, some of us have more challenges than oth-

    ers, daily struggles to overcome.

    Growing up with a disability isnt easy. Simple tasks that able-bodied people overlook can be a constant burden for people with disabilities. These troubles, big or small, can give us reason to hesitate and limit ourselves. Because of this, many people with disabilities are only using a small

    portion of their potential.

    The reason behind this issue is to motivate you to do more and to show you that nothing is impossible. Struggles, for the able-bodied or for people with disabilities, give each person a unique perspective on the world and the chance to rise above

    their challenges using their own experience and abilities.

    In the pages to follow, we speak to a number of incredible individuals with disabilities that have achieved greatness, pushing past their obstacles to compete in the Paralympics and receive incredible opportunities. We speak to three incredible people with disabilities who have started their own successful businesses. Weve also included information on financial opportunities for people with disabilities to en-

    sure everyone has a fair shot at a stable future.

    And this issue isnt just for those with disabilities. There are people everywhere that arent challenging themselves, that arent pushing for greatness. However, reading these incredible stories should get you off the couch, striving to

    fulfil your potential, and inspiring you to do more.

    Although the people interviewed have gone on to do amazing things and live fulfilling lives, we believe every-one has the ability for greatness; sometimes we just need the inspiration to bring it out. Hopefully this issue provides you with the needed boost to push your limits and leap into

    your own adventure.

    Happy reading!

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    06

    GOING ABROAD | TIPS & TRICKS

    Making the decision to study abroad isnt always easy. There are lots of things to consider, like finances and how prepared you are to live in a foreign country. The decision can be made even more difficult when you have to take your disability into consideration.

    One way to ease your transition into a foreign country is to try and learn the language of the country youll be go-ing to. Although this is not a specific disability-related tip, knowing the official language is extremely helpful. You dont have to be fluent, but learning some basic phrases can go a long way if you should ever need assistance.

    Before you start packing away language books, there are some other things you should make sure youve coveredfor instance, finding out what studying is like in the coun-try youll be living.

    Uwe Hahnewald, a business administration student, is visually impaired. When he decided to go to a different country to study, he made sure to do his research upfront.

    I like to know a little bit about where I am going, he says. I familiarized myself with the subway and bus sys-tem, or which shops are in the area I am living in.

    Getting to know the neighbourhood and city youll be liv-ing in can be a great help in making a smooth transition

    into your new surroundings. Doing research can also give you an idea of how accessible certain areas are, as well as what the public transportation system is like, should you require something like Torontos Wheel-Trans service.

    According to Melissa Nisbett, communications manager with the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE), students can find out in advance what kind of environment theyll be in by speaking directly with the schools that they plan on attending.

    Institutions can provide assessment tests for students to identify issues and follow up with students to identify the best locations for each student, she says. Students can do their own research for institutions by contacting the accessibility office, or the international student offices of the places they are interested in.

    Hahnewald agrees. Get in touch with the school to see whether they offer disability services and what kind of ac-commodations they offer. If possible, try to get a hold on a former disabled student who can share their experiences with you.

    Speaking with students like Hahnewald and getting a feel for what life in a foreign country will be like for someone who has a disability is a great way to get the next best thing to a first-hand experience. Knowing what youre in

    GETTIN OUTTA HEREGET IN TOUCH wITH THE SCHOOL TO SEE wHETHER THEY OFFER DISABILITY SERVICES AND wHAT KIND OF ACCOMMODATIONS THEY OFFER. IF pOSSIBLE, TRY TO GET A HOLD OF A FORMER DISABLED STUDENT wHO CAN SHARE THEIR ExpERIENCES wITH YOU.

    Words Kate Aenlle // illustrations Anthony Capano

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    07

    RESOURCES

    for before you get on a plane might also make the decision to stay or go much easier.

    Hahnewald also recommends taking a trip to the city where your school is, as studying abroad is a long-term de-cision and, sometimes, you just need to experience things for yourself. He was fortunate enough to have vacationed in the country where he studied so he had an idea of what life would be like for him if he lived there.

    Get assistance from organizations well before you get to your new location. Organizations like CBIE, for example, encourage over 150 members of theirs, (which include colleges, universities, and partner organizations), to serve vulnerable groups including individuals with visible and non-visible disabilities.

    We also provide sessions for our members on the best practices for student placements at our annual confer-ence, says Nisbett. Our members prepare their students through assessments with either the international student office or accessibilities office.

    There are many other organizations out there that assist students with disabilities to achieve their post-secondary education goals, like the National Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS). They encourage the self-empowerment of post-secondary students with dis-

    abilities, and are advocates for increased accessibility at all levels so that disabled students may gain equal access to college or university education, which is their right. Organizations like NEADS may also be beneficial to stu-dents with disabilities, since NEADS board members are all consumers with disabilities, with the exception of the open rep.

    When making the decision to study abroad, students may overlook travel accommodations. Queens University, for example, collected a pre-departure resources fact sheet for students with disabilities hoping to study abroad that out-lines everything you need to know before you pack your bags. It includes links to disability travel planning and in-formation on accessibility in places you may be studying.

    Uprooting yourself to study abroad is arguably one of the most exciting and challenging experiences for a stu-dent. Hahnewald, who had a great experience studying abroad, recommends that other students who want to do the same should give it a shot and not let their disability determine whether or not they should go.

    I recommend studying abroad because it expands your horizons, he says. I think confidence, organization, and research is everything [if you want to study abroad]. The more I know upfront, the easier it was.

  • FCC really walks the talk when it comes to respecting differences.

    Julie, Accounts Payable File Clerk

    At FCC, weve built a culture where you can be yourself. Youre an individual and it takes strong individuals to make a strong team. So, be who you are and feel at home when you come to work.

    fcc.ca/diversity

    Be comfortable with diversity

    Theres more than one way to make a difference. Thats why at Imperial we offer multiple career paths that align with your ambitions. From developing new innovations in the oil sands to delivering high quality petroleum products, whatever your career, youll always have a place on a team that s working towards creating a better future.

    Hiring students and graduates from engineering, science, business and trades & technology.

    imperialoil.ca/careers

    Discover whats possible for your career.

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    09

    INVESTMENT IN DISABILITIES

    Supporting the futures

    of Canadians comes

    top-of-mind when

    talking investments.

    through the economic

    action plan, the

    Government of Canada

    recently invested

    millions of dollars in

    funding for Canadians

    with disabilities.

    Words Kate Aenlle // images Mirek

    RESOURCESGOVERNMENT FUNDING | ECONOMIC ACTION PLAN

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    GOVERNMENT FUNDING | ECONOMIC ACTION PLAN

    upporting people with disabilities is an essential part of ensuring that they have bright and prom-ising futures, especially when it

    comes time for them to find em-ployment. The Government of Canada is taking steps to ensure that people with disabilities meet their career goals, through the

    Canadian Economic Action Plan.

    Last year, they invested an additional $30 million over three years in an opportunities fund. According to the Canadian Economic Action Plan, this investment will enable more Canadians with disabilities to obtain work experience with small- and medium-sized businesses, as well as raise awareness among employers of the contribu-tion people with disabilities can make to their business, and encourage them to hire people with disabilities.

    In a news release from the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, The Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development, describes why it is important to invest money in pro-grams to help people with disabilities find employment. Canada needs all of our available talent at work, says Minister Finley. That is why Economic Action Plan 2013 is increasing opportunities for people with disabili-ties, helping them gain the skills and training they need to better participate in Canadas labour market.

    Another way the Canadian Economic Action Plan is increasing opportunities for employment among people with disabilities is by trying to propel the increase in their employment through the Canadian Employers Disabil-ity Forum. The program will be managed by employ-ers, for employers, to support education, training and sharing of resources and best practices concerning the hiring and retention of people with disabilities. This will ensure that the skills of people with disabilities will be promoted, in order to show employers that theyre valuable to the workforce.

    These plans and programs will hopefully increase employ-ment among people with disabilities. Analytical reports show that employment rates for people with disabilities are on the rise and, hopefully, the continued progress of the Canadian Economic Action Plan and the Canadian Employers Disability Form will keep this trend going.

    IN THE 2013 GOVERNMENT BUDGET pLAN, pEOpLE CAN ExpECT THE CONTINUING SUppORT FOR THESE pROGRAMS. IT OUTLINES SpECIFICALLY:

    the introduction to a new generation of labour market agreements for persons with disabilities by 2014, which will better meet employment needs of businesses and the employment prospects of people with disabilities.

    reforming and extending the Opportunities Fund with $40 million per year starting in 20152016, in order to provide more training solutions for people with disabilities.

    extending the enabling accessibility Fund, a fund that supports capital costs of construction and renovations to improve physical accessibility for people with disabilities by $15 million a year.

    The budget plan also stated, Since 2006, the govern-ments top priority has been the economy and job cre-ation. With all of these plans, the hope is just that. In years to come, these programs should help create more opportunities for employment for people with disabili-ties, as well as increase their accessibility which, in turn, will promote a more diverse workforce.

  • THINKING OF STARTING A BUSINESS?

    Up to $45,000 financing

    One-to-one business mentoring

    Business resources

    Pre-launch coaching

    Find out how at futurpreneur.ca or call 1-800-464-2923

    ARE YOU 18-39?F U T U R P R E N E U R C A N A D A C A N H E L P !

    @Futurpreneur/Futurpreneur

    C

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    jobpostingadd_update.pdf 1 9/8/2014 4:38:27 PM

    At SaskPower, we generate more than just electricity for

    Saskatchewan residents.

    We also offer some of the best career opportunities in the province.

    Visit saskpower.com/careers to learn more and find the latest job listings.

    Get plugged into a great career.

    Want to make a difference?FINTRAC is recognized as a leader among the worlds financial intelligence units. Join the fight against terrorist financing and money laundering!

    To learn more about FINTRAC and its employment opportunities, visit http://www.fintrac-canafe.gc.ca

    Vous voulez faire une diffrence? CANAFE est reconnu comme tant un chef de file parmi les units de renseignement financier autour du monde. Joignez-vous CANAFE dans la lutte contre le financement des activits terroristes et le blanchiment dargent!

    Pour en savoir plus sur CANAFE et ses possibilits demploi, veuillez consulter le http://www.canafe-fintrac.gc.ca

  • cambriancollege.ca

    The world-renowned Glenn Crombie Centre for Student Support is a multi-service complex that promotes accessibility and success for students within the Cambrian Community.

    FREE services include: Academic advising Career advising Personal counselling And more If you have ever been diagnosed with a disability or experienced significant difficulties in your education, our team is trained to provide a wide range of advisory, assistive technology, and counselling services to help you. Learn more about why over 1,000 students with disabilities choose Cambrian each year.

    Make an appointment to speak to one of our advisors at any time by calling (705) 566-8101, extension 7420 or 7311.

    Build Your SuccessDisability and Counselling Services to Help you Realize your Potential

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014NEADS | AWARDS & FUNDING

    Words James Michael McDonald // illustration Narok Saad

    ExTRA FUNDING

    post-secondary institutions nationwide have made great strides in accommodating people with disabilities, understanding that a college or university education is extremely important to all people. From wheelchair ramps to special services in and out of classes to

    entire departments dedicated to people with disabilities, a post-secondary education is more available than ever.

    that said, we all know education costs a pretty penny; books, courses, and living expenses quickly add up. For people with disabilities, extra expenses are often a factor, meaning more money with more barriers.

    luckily, there are several financial resources available for students with disabilities.

    13

    RESOURCES

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    NEADS | AWARDS & FUNDING

    14

    THE NEADS NATIONAL STUDENT AwARDS pROGRAM OFFERS FINANCIAL OppORTUNITIES FOR DISABLED SUpERSTARS.

    An organization dedicated to this pursuit is the Na-tional Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS), which has the mandate to support full ac-cess to education and employment for post-secondary students and graduates with disabilities across Canada. They offer a database of resources, employment work-shops, conferences, and special projects, all focused on access to education.

    We address all aspects of post-secondary access and services, and were a cross-disability organization, says Frank Smith, national coordinator. It covers the gamut from physical disabilities to students who are deaf and hard of hearing to those with learning disabilities. They also represent students with mental health issues and blind or visually impaired, and everyone in between.

    NEADS partners with a number of organizations to strengthen its reach, such as the Council of Canadians with Disabilities, the Canadian Federation of Students, and the Canadian Alliance of Students Association, among others.

    In the last decade, the organization has developed two financial awards programs: The NEADS National Stu-dent Awards Program, worth $3,000, and the Holly Barlett Memorial Award, worth $1,000.

    The NEADS student program started first and is mov-ing into its eighth year, says Smith, and the Holly Bartlett award began four years ago, honouring a for-mer NEADS board member who passed. Through partnerships with various companies, private sector funding, and individual donors, NEADS has given out 67 tuition scholarships.

    We consider them to be tuition scholarships, as they are primarily set up to support the cost of feed that students would have to incur, so the scholarships are not paid to the students directly; theyre paid to the university of the college awards office.

    To be eligible, NEADS looks at a variety of factors to

    select recipients. We look at the balanced student who is both good in their studies and also an outstanding, well-rounded person, says Smith.

    Chelsea Mohler was the recipient of the NEADS Na-tional Student Award in 2010 and 2011, partially fund-ing her masters degree in rehabilitation science.

    Mohler has congenital glaucoma and was born with no vision, although through corrective surgeries, she now has partial vision. She went on to complete two degrees and has been employed in roles doing important work for people with disabilities.

    I completed an eight-month contract where I worked on a project looking at how to make science laboratories and practical spaces within courses that are comfort-able for students with disabilities, she says. She spent her time conducting interviews with professionals in the community, looking at methods and best practices for practical learning environments outside the science lab context. A lab in a physical therapy school or an occu-pational therapy school and, of course, we were respon-sible for retrieving and synthesizing literature as well.

    Her funding helped her develop the skills and research in her masters necessary to excel in these roles. I had a research assistant so it helped me cover some of the costs for her and, in my last year as a graduate, I didnt live in London, Ontario where I did my mastersI com-muted when I had to be on campus from Torontoso it helped with that.

    Mohler was chosen because of her reference letters, her answers in her personal essay, and her extensive involve-ment in the community. In the future, she hopes to con-tinue to help others and find solutions.

    My interests are inclusion and higher education, she says. I also have a vested interest in the area of employ-ment of people with vision loss.

    To find out more about NEADS and their funding ini-tiatives, check out neads.ca.

  • DisabilityAwards.ca

    Canadas portal to awardsand scholarships for

    students with disabilities

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    PARALYMPIAN | BENOT HUOT

    16

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    17

    SUPERSTARS

    From the Greek preposition para meaning beside or parallel, the paralympics are meant to signify the parallel games to the Olympics. its the idea that the two move-ments exist side-by-side, according to the international paralympic Committee.

    Canadian paralympic swimmer benot huot wants to play a part in helping that movement grow by increasing aware-ness and showing Canadians the differences between the two events. theres still a lot of work to be done, he says. its better than it used to be but we need to work in the right direction to try and make that paralympic gold medal worth the same in the eyes of the general public as the Olympic gold medal.

    wITH 19 pARALYMpIC MEDALS, SwIMMER BENOT HUOT HOpES TO EARN HIS 20TH IN 2016 IN RIO.

    wE NEED TO STOp THINKING THAT pEOpLE wITH A DISABILITY ARE DIFFERENT. wERE NO DIFFERENT THAN ANY OTHER AND wE CAN DO EVERYTHING THAT wE wANT.

    Words Jamie Bertolini // images Cdn. Paralympic Cmte.

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    PARALYMPIAN | BENOT HUOT

    THE HUMANHuot, from Montreal, was born with a clubfoot, which is why hes eligible to compete in the Paralympics. The severity of a clubfoot differs among people. For Huot, he says everything below the knee on his right leg is smaller. The leg and foot are also less flexible in comparison.

    As a kid, I had to learn how to do the proper [kick] and even today its still very hard for me to kick normally, he says. It pretty much just doesnt look normal because of the mobility in the ankle and flexibility and so on.

    Huot recently graduated from the University of Quebec in Montreal with a major in communications marketing and minor in manage-ment. Due to his full-time training schedule, it took him eight years to complete the degree.

    The athlete hopes to remain connect-ed with physical activity, physical lit-eracy, and sports in his future. This is something that Id really love to do after Im done swimming because its something that Ive got from my sport and I want to try to give back as much as possible, he says.

    THE ATHLETEHuot was first able to represent Can-ada back in 2000 during the Para-lympic Games in Sydney, Australia. Since then, hes qualified for every summer games and has received 19 Paralympic medals overall, nine of which are gold.

    Something that was very, very special for me was being the main flag bearer at the closing ceremony for the London 2012 Paralympic Games, says Huot. [They] select one athlete and I was the lucky one. After a great career, it was a real honour to carry that flag. Happens once in a lifetime!

    Huot has also broken more than 50 world records since joining the Ca-nadian National Team in 1998.

    FavOurite healthy FOOd / PeACheS

    FavOurite JunK FOOd / ChOCOLATe

    FavOurite hObby / GOLFING

    FavOurite mOvie / FOrreST GuMP

    SOME SIDE NOTES AND FUN FACTS ABOUT THE MAN BEHIND THE MEDALS

    THERES NO DIFFERENCE IN ACHIEVEMENT BEING DISABLED OR BEING ABLE-BODIED. IF YOU

    BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, YOULL ACCOMpLISH EVERYTHING.

    THE FOUNDATIONWhen he isnt training, Huot not only works hard to shed more light on the Paralympic movement but also works to help kids with disabili-ties achieve their dreams of someday competing at an international level.

    In 2009, Huot started the Benot Huot Foundation after talking to American Olympic swimmer Mi-chael Phelps. The well-known ath-lete came to Montreal that year and helped raise $25,000 on the Foun-dations first night, says Huot.

    The objective of the foundation is really to help athletes with disabili-ties that have the dream to compete at the Paralympics, he says. So they arent Paralympians yet.

    Rather than supporting high-perfor-mance athletes, the Foundation aims to assist those who are still working towards making the national team.

    According to Huot, they lose a lot of talented young athletes in their teenage years because of a lack of resources. The objective is to sup-port that little window of athletes.

    For young people coping with a disability in the workforce and else-where, Huot offers this advice: We need to stop thinking that people with a disability are different. Were no different than any other and we can do everything that we want.

    If you want to become a lawyer or you want to become an accountant, you can do it. Its the same. Theres no difference in achievement being disabled or being able-bodied. If you believe in yourself, youll ac-complish everything.

  • BDO. Because relationships matter.There are many world-class accounting fi rms. Far fewer that offer a culture so rich in professional opportunity, personal fulfi llment, and long-term growth. At BDO, we understand that exceptional service to our clients begins and ends with exceptional regard for our people. Because at its core, our business is not about numbers or spreadsheets, dollars or pence, but about people working with, for, and in service of others. In short, because relationships matter.

    I gured itd be a couple years before I got this kind of responsibility.

    Career Opportunities at BDO.

    BDO Canada Limited is an affi liate of BDO Canada LLP. BDO Canada LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership, is a member of BDO International Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, and forms part of the international BDO network of independent member fi rms. BDO is the brand name for the BDO network and for each of the BDO Member Firms.

    Assurance | Accounting | Tax | Advisorywww.bdo.ca/campus

    Connect with BDO

    facebook.com/BDOCanada linkedin.com/company/bdo-canada

    twitter.com/CheckOutBDO youtube.com/BDOCanadawww.bdo.ca/campus

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    STARTUPS | OVERCOMING OBSTACLES

    ITS JUST FUNNY THAT YOU CAN TAKE SOMETHING

    THAT wAS A DISABILITY AND TURN IT INTO A MAJOR pOSITIVE.

  • JOBpOSTINGS.CA | (diS) ability | September 2014

    21

    FEATURE

    Starting your own business from the ground up for the first time isnt simple. dealing with financials, gaining entrepreneurial experience, and having to flesh out a detailed business plan are just some of the challenges you may encounter as a rookie

    business owner. but that shouldnt stop you.

    youll eventually get past the hurdles, build a strong network and, most importantly, gain the business

    experience you dreamed of when you first started. the three entrepreneurs we profile learned the

    ropes the same way you will, but with one special trait: their disabilities. and that didnt stop them.

    STARTING Up wITH

    NO LIMITSWords Megan Santos // ilustrations Anthony Capano, Marvid

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    STARTUPS | MAAYAN & KEITH

    MAAYAN ZIVpHOTOGRApHER

    MAAYAN zIV pHOTOGRApHY

    It took a broken wheelchair, a point-and-shoot camera, and the streets of New York City for Maayan Ziv to discover her passion for photography. Maayan lives with type two, spinal muscular atrophya disability that causes muscle weakness throughout her body. A type of muscular dystro-phy, she travels, shoots, and performs everyday tasks from her wheelchair.

    Starting out as a camera-loving high school student, Maayan went on to study radio and television at Ryer-son University, and worked on the side as a freelance photographer before starting her business, Maay-an Ziv Photography. It is kind of my brand that I launched a couple of years ago, she explains. It was something that I was really passion-ate about, so I took that leap and started putting myself out there and seeing if I could build a company.

    A fashion enthusiast with a fort in portrait photography, Maayan has had the opportunity to work with Toronto-based talent, in addition to familiar names like Edward Norton, Keri Russell, and Ontarios Lieu-tenant Governor David Onley. The chance to photograph these famous faces came through hard work, in a self-branding experience Maayan simply describes as interesting.

    She focused her energy on networking and getting her name out to the public, she explains. I put together a website,

    and started reaching out to people. I think a lot of it had to do with me being something different than what most people were expecting.

    And her models were drawn to her. Being a photographer in a wheel-chair was something that was actual-ly exciting for people, says Maayan, so they wanted to see how I worked and how I could do it.

    Since then, she has been able to travel back to her photography roots in New York City where she met with Grace Coddington, creative director of the American Vogue Magazine. It was my first ever portfolio viewing, says Maayan. I had these really cool high-lights in the beginning that set me off and got me started; its been really great and Ive been really lucky.

    The curiosity from others sparked Maayans creativity and motivated her to constantly try something new whenever the opportunity presented itself, but with a disability that af-fects her muscles and mobility, shes often asked how she does it all.

    Sometimes people have questions about technical stuff, she says, refer-ring to managing cameras and light-ing, for instance. I found that when-ever there was any kind of obstacle and because I have to be creative, Ill have to find a way to make it work for me, adding that her artistic ap-proach has become a signature part of the way she operates her business.

    I just use my own camera and I use lighter lenses so Im not work-ing with a heavy camera because weight for me can be an issue, says Maayan. Those lenses give off a certain look so thats now what Im known for. Its an interesting mix between what my abilities are and being creative with what I can do.

    In her years of photographing on the side to her current role at Maayan Ziv Photography, Maayan confidently says nothing has stopped her from pursuing what she wanted to do. She offers a piece of corny advice, as she calls it, to young entrepreneurs with disabilities: I think the first thing is to believe in yourself and have the strength and confidence to say this is what I love and then just go for it.

    As she aspires to continue grow-ing as a photographer, Maayan has goals of adding editorial portraiture to her portfolio, in addition to creat-ing awareness of disabilities in the arts. Whats her next stop? Shell be taking part in the Fashion Follows Form: Designs for Sitting Exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum that runs until the end of January 2015.

    Its really important for me to con-tinue my work and create more of a message about that, she says. Ill be part of that exhibition and theres a write up about me, and I just talk about being a photogra-pher with a disability.

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    A career that started in skilled trades quickly changed when the British Columbia-based company that Keith Gelhorn was working for cut its staff from 77 to four in six months. To make matters more complicated, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disor-der (ADHD) shortly after.

    I had a lot of problems with organi-zation, getting orders right, and fol-lowing things in a linear path, says Keith, explaining the symptoms he had before he was diagnosed. I was good at little pockets of things but couldnt link everything together, adding that easy tasks sometimes took him twice as long to complete.

    Unsure where his career was go-ing to take him next, Keith decided hed pursue his first passion in social worka path he was told not to take years before. I wanted to get into social work when I was com-ing out of high school and going into university but it took me about four years to do two years worth of school, he explains. When I came out of two years of college, I tried getting into the University of Vic-toria but I only had about a 70 per cent average and they wouldnt let me in. This led Keith to a ten-year career in skilled trades as a plumber before he started his own business ADDvocacy ADHD & Life Skills Coaching, a service designed to of-fer support and guidance to people

    diagnosed with ADHD.

    But prior to his entrepreneurial de-but, Keith knew he had to do his research. Seeing the thousands of ADHD coaches south of the border, he noticed Canada was lacking in the field. I thought this would be a good opportunity to go back to school, so the school that I went to is called the ADD Coach Academy in New York, he says. The timing wouldnt work out for it if I stayed in BC, so I relocated [to Nova Sco-tia] and went to school for disability supports and services, and then did coaching school at night. Soon af-ter, he started ADDvocacy ADHD & Life Skills Coaching.

    Focusing on lessons in organiza-tion, time management, relationship building, and educating in ADHD, Keith now coaches 30 students from the Nova Scotia Community Col-lege in Eastern Canada, in addition to a contract with non-profit groups throughout the province. And his experience running a business with ADHD himself has been life chang-ing. Im always cooking up new ideas and Im finding it really helpful in terms of being creative, he says. A lot of things come to me quickly so the amount that Ive been able to accomplish in two and a half years of doing this is pretty phenomenal.

    In 2013, Keith took his accomplish-ments further after he received the

    2013 Entrepreneur of the Year Award from the Nova Scotia-based Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Network (EDN). That was pretty significant given the fact that I had all these challenges, he says. I had such a rocky career over the years so winning that was pretty substan-tial. The spinoffs from it have been huge. Now with a seat on the EDN board of directors, Keith was able to land additional contracts, further helping the growth of his two-year-old company.

    Its just funny that you can take something that was a disability and turn it into a major positive, he says. This year, I just got back from a high school tour with a business coordinator from EDN. We talked to high school kids about entrepreneur-ship and just different alternatives.

    In addition to his full-time coaching career for people with ADHD, Keith continues to encourage entrepreneur-ship for young people despite their disabilities. Find out as much as you can about the disability and reach out for mentors and the resources around you. Working for yourself could be extremely rewarding.

    Looking ahead, Keith hopes to fill the support needs for ADHD sufferers throughout Nova Scotia, help other entrepreneurs kick-start their busi-nesses, while also collaborating with other ADHD experts to write a book.

    KEITH GELHORNOwNER

    ADDVOCACY ADHD LIFE SKILLS & COACHING

    FEATURE

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    JENNIFER VAN AMEROMFOUNDING pARTNER

    CULTURE & COMpANY INC.

    A successful recruiting career came to a brief halt when Jennifer van Amerom was diagnosed with neu-romyelitis optica (NMO). Our au-toimmune system chooses to attack certain cells that protect the nerve fibres in our bodies and can leave temporary or permanent paraly-sis, says Jennifer, explaining NMO. The protecting layers of the cells that get attacked are primarily in the eyes, which causes optic neuritis and causes people to go blind.

    NMO is a rare disease with symp-toms similar to that of multiple scle-rosis, like pins and needles and burn-ing sensations throughout the body. For Jennifer, it was a trip to Europe that made her realize something wasnt right. I thought I just had a bad sunburn; it was just an aver-age day and my leg basically went numb, she says. Within a couple of hours I had lost feeling and was para-lyzed from the waist down. A later attack affecting Jennifers vision con-firmed her diagnosis of NMO, but has been fortunate enough to recov-er from both instances, and has now gone back to her recruiting roots.

    Before her diagnosis in 2009, Jenni-fer worked with clients across North America and Europe, specializing in recruitment for web design, front-end development, print publications, and any other position within the creative realm. In her comeback, she opted to part ways with the company

    she had previously been working for, and took on a new chapter in her life.

    Jennifer started Culture & Compa-ny Inc. in 2013 with long-time, on and off colleague Shadi Ghani, af-ter both women believed it was the perfect time to make an impact on the recruitment industry. Both hav-ing an entrepreneurial edge, they set out to fill the gap in company culture within the creative recruit-ment industry.

    We do a really deep dive around understanding the types of people that work best in certain teams, she says. Everyones always talking about extroverts for example, and how theyre great sales folks, but in-troverts need to be championed as well; theyve got a real driving force behind them.

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    WITH A DISABILITYWITHOUT A DISABILITY

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    Mentorship, work experience, and an existing networking is what Jen-nifer says was needed prior to open-ing their own firm. And with all three essentials checked off, Jennifer and Shadi are now able to help large organizations with recruitment, and are continuing to grow as a com-pany and as business owners. Our long-term goal is to be bigger than just digital marketing recruitment, says Jennifer. Were not sure which markets well predominantly focus on or where theyll be based, but we know itll be bigger.

    Despite having NMO, Jennifer says it hasnt stopped her from build-ing on her experience as a business owner. I dont think Ive worked any harder in my career than I have as an entrepreneur. She advises that to be an entrepreneurwith or without a disabilityrequires a lot of soul searching and an un-derstanding of what motivates you. Youve really got to be comfort-able with that and comfortable with knowing that you have to stay pas-sionate about it.

    As for the individuals living with a disability: [Entrepreneurship] is always a possibility, says Jennifer. You can certainly find a way but you have to be a really good planner and make yourself physically num-ber one.

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