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A mock magazine that I produced as part of a final assessment during my third year studying Journalism at Chester University

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  • photographerc h e s h i r em a y 2010

    expand your horizonslearn how to capture the big picture

    dslr vs hybrid vs compactwe give the low down on which breed of camera is best for you

    take the plunge

    www.cheshirephotographer.com

    cp chats to michael seymour aboutlife as a freelance photographer

    natural light...

    friend or foe?

    reflections...h o yeah!

    macro masterpiecesthat dont breakthe bank

    focusliam cronin examines the latest in camera phone

    and canon can ever be bridged

    3.50

    technology and asks if the gap between nokia

    2

  • capture the imagecapture the moment

    capture the memories

  • contentsbringing life into focuscheshire photographer:

    The world around us is a beautiful place, filled with infinite amounts of detail that the human eye is unable to pick up on as it passes by. Here at the cheshire photographer we believe that photographs play a vital part in examining the wonder that the planet has to offer. The county of cheshire holds some of the most amazing woodlands, his-torical sites and landscapes that the country has to offer so lets get out there and use this to our advantage to take some breathtaking

    photographs. The cheshire photographer endeavours to showcase these areas as well as helping you to create your own masterpieces. In the office we have ex-perts at hand to show you how to introduce various techniques in to your own portfolio without enduring the vast economic drawbacks that is associated with the industry. In this first edition we have focused on the rural aspect of the county bringing areas such as, beeston, northwich, tarporley and delemere in to

    the viewfinder. The majesty of the still im-age is one that will never die, so please join us on our journey across cheshire as we bring life in to focus.

    page 3www.cheshirephotographer.com

    page 4 michael seymour talks to the cheshire photographer about his life so far, favourite techniques and tips for emerging photographers.

    page 6 we discuss the issues with natural light. how to use it to your advantage, and what to avoid.

    page 7 your latest dose of all the photographic news, be it camera releases or competition launches.

    page 8 expand your horizons with liam cronin as he discusses how to improve the technical elements of your portfolio.

    page 10 we give you a step by step guide to selective colour enhancement in adobe photoshop CS3.

    page 12 dslr, hybrid or compact?a rundown of the facts that you will need to know when looking in to buying your new camera.

    page 13 focus: liam cronin talks about the ever advancing nature of camera phones whilst reviewing the all new sony ericsson satio

    page 15 macro shots without the damage to you bank balance as well as a look in to reflections in photography

  • michael seymour:A career in freelance photography is one that is rife with uncertainty. Where will the next job come from? How do you get started? Am I good enough? All of these are questions that play on the mind of a photographer when making the leap in to the industry. The Cheshire photographer has spoken to Michael Seymour, a regularly published freelance photographer and journalist. Michael grew up in Cheshire learning the industry from an early age, playing with his fathers old work cameras. the first camera I ever owned was an old Pen-

    tax ME super, its about 20 years old now but I still use it regularly. growing up this was an ideal camera as it was all completely manual which meant that I grasped how to perform basic functions very quickly, unlike todays cameras of which most have an auto setting. Said Michael

    From an early age Michael was

    always experimenting with cameras and took every excuse he could to get his hands on a new piece of equipment be it a wedding birthday or other family function. I have always been interested in capturing memories, probably because my own memory is so poor. Said Michael By the age of 16 Michael had decided that A-levels were not the choice for him and decided to study for his B-Tech national diploma in photography at Mid-Cheshire College. A-Levels really did seem too vague for me and non of the courses available offered me enough focus on what I really wanted to do. The diploma was fascinating to me and I could really see the future career path potential. Michael has been a

    liam cronin talks to freelancer michael seymour

    page 4 www.cheshirephotographer.com

    connoisseur of film

  • taking the plungecameras for as long as he can remember preferring the aesthetics that can be created using traditional cameras despite the drawbacks in convenience. The young freelancers portfolio is vast and covers all areas of photography such as macro shots, lighting effects and experimentation with exposure, however some of the most poignant images in his portfolio are based around the Lomography movement. Lomography focuses on snap shot photographs that are often intentionally over exposed, blurred or over saturated but each photographer carries their own particular style. I love the ethos of the Lomography movement; dont think, just shoot its brilliant, it really encapsulates how I like to look upon the world.

    Even my favourite bit of kit comes from the Lomography movement, its my fisheye Lomography camera, its a bit dated now but it really does still know how to cut the mustard. It gives such an interesting effect on the prints and in my opinion nothing can match it. Michael made his break on to the freelance scene whilst at university, selling several photographs to various newspapers in the area as well as building a substantial portfolio. My advice to anyone looking to make a move in to the freelance photography industry is just to shoot everything you can, you never know what someone may find artsy

    or important enough to spend their cash on. Most of my favourite pictures I have in my portfolio are completely unplanned, and they seem to be the ones that sell. Most importantly never be knocked back by somone telling you your images are not of use to them, times change and the good thing about photographs is that they dont. Peoples opinions of the same image differ. For more information on freelance photography please visit the cheshire photographers website, www.cheshirephotographer.com

    about his youth, kit and love of lomography

    page 5www.cheshirephotographer.com

  • Lighting provides us with the ability to see the wonderful world around us, producing shadows and creating shapes upon ordinarily mundane objects. For the photographer though, lighting does pose somewhat of an issue. To get the balance right between the two extremities of the medium takes time and practice but when you crack

    it the world is literally yours for the taking. Be conscious of where the light source is. If it is right in front of you be careful not to over expose the image by adjusting shutter speeds, if the image is to bright, increase the shutter speed to allow less light in to the lens and if it is too dark, increase the shutter speed to allow more light in. If the light source is above

    or behind you be conscious of the shadows and where they fall. The last thing you want is the colour of your fo-cal point to be blunted by a shadow. Natural light is a bit of a double edged sword in this manner, work with it and your images will be brighter, more colourful and eye catching than anything that could ever be shot in a studio, but try to fight it and you will lose.

    natural light: a friendly foe

  • photographersnewsyour one stop shop for all

    Metropolitan police officers are no longer able to prevent the taking of photographs under new regulations con-tained within the officers handbook. Up until last week police officers were able to prevent photographs being taken in sensitive areas and confis-cate any images that had already been taken. The amended hand book states, Officers do not have the power to delete digital images or destroy film at any point during a search. Dele-tion or destruction may only

    things photographytake place following seizure if there is a lawful power (such as a court order) that permits such deletion or destruction. The adjustment in policy has been met with a sigh of relief from the photographical industry, Peter Thorp, Daven-ham Studios, said, this is such a huge step forward for free-lance photographers. In the past it was almost impossible to get any photo-graphs when the police were in risk of being in shot but now we can breath easy and just concentrate on getting that snap. The law was very vague prior to this, and Im not en-tirely sure the police were able to enforce it consistently, hence the issues that the in-dustry was having.

    rights changefor

    photographers

    The Cheshire photographer has launched its photogra-pher of the year competition. The competition is open to all photographers and categories range from best landscape shot to best use of lighting and the winner will receive 10k worth of photo-graphical equipment as well as studio time with the pros. The judges will be looking for how the photographs are composed, use of focus and lighting. In order to stand a chance of winning the competition

    you need to send all of your pictures, maximum 3 per entrant, to; cheshire@photographer.co.uk

    competition launch

    canon has announced the release of the new 1D DSLR camera. the camera boasts over 25 customizable shooting modes as well as a hybrid auto white balance. the camera is due for releas in july of this year priced at apporximately 4500

    new canonannounced

    page 7www.cheshirephotographer.com

  • view finderliam cronin gives