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    This exhibition celebrates the career journeys of a selectionof our women researchers. The women in the photographsrepresent just a small selection of the fantastic women

    researchers who work across different disciplines atvarious levels across QMU.

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    Queen Margaret University is committed to the principles

    of the Charter and values equality and diversity across its workforce. To support these principles and to

    promote the role o f women in SET, the University has

    undertaken an internal self-assessment process and hasbeen successful in gaining a Bronze SWAN Award.

    The University sees membership o f the Charter, with

    its bronze, silver and gold SWAN recognition awards,as working towards sustaining equitable working

    environments enabling QMU to identify itself as an

    employer of choice, not only to its staff, but to students,stakeholders, research councils and industry.

    The Athena SWAN

    Charter is a recognition

    scheme for UK universities

    and their science,

    engineering and technology(SET) departments. It aims

    to assist the recruitment,

    retention and progression

    of women in SET.

    In 2013, Queen Margaret University was delighted to receive

     the Bronze Athena SWAN Award in light of its commitmentto assisting the recruitment and retention of women 

    in science, engineering and technology (SET).

    QMU Athena SwanBronze Award

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    I’m Dr Patrycja Strycharczuk, and I do research on how and

    why sounds of language change. Sound change is something

    we’re not normally aware of , yet somehow we sound slightly

    differently from our parents or our grandparents.

    RESEARCH FELLOW, SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES

    WOMEN 

    RESEARCHERS

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    RESEARCH CAREER

     JOURN EYS

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    I am Dr Maria Paola Bissiri, I hold a PhD in Phonetics from the

    Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich in Germany. In my research

    work I compare native with non-native speech productions andinvestigate speech perception in different languages.

    RESEARCH FELLOW, SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES

    I have worked as a Research Fellow in several institutions

    across Europe: the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich,

    the Charles University in Prague, the University of the BasqueCountry in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain), the University of Bristol,

    and the Technical University of Dresden (Germany).

    I am happy to work as a researcher, because this allows me to

    learn something new every day.

    I have always been fascinated by language. I rememberlistening to foreign languages as a child and wondering how it

    would feel to be able to recognise words in such mysterious

    languages. I grew up in Sardinia from Sardinian-Italian bilingualparents. Sardinian, an archaic Romance language, is a UNESCO

    endangered language.

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     JOURN EYS

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    Examples of our research arePilates for people with MSwho use a wheelchair and acommunity exercise programmefor young people with CerebralPalsy. Exercise can be a way ofself-management, i.e. peoplecan take care of their conditionthemselves, instead of relying on

    drugs or surgical interventions.

    I am Dr Marietta van der Linden and I am doing research on

    how exercise and assistive technology can improve the abilityto perform activities of daily living in people with a neurological

    condition such as Multiple Sclerosis or Cerebral Palsy.

     Assistive technologies to aid walking suchas splints allow people to walk further and

    more easily which can positively impact theirparticipation and general health.

    Finding out from study participants how

    they feel a certain inter vention has positivelyimpacted their function and then showing

    these benets through objectively measured

    outcomes is probably the most rewardingaspect of my area of research.

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    I am passionate aboutimproving the patient journey through strokeservices and aftercompleting my PhD I

    plan to continue myresearch into variousaspects of stroke care.

    My past work has examined the value of engagingin purposeful activities, which is another area which

    I am passionate about - particularly the eld of

    physical activities as contributors to the quality of

    life of various groups of people .

    I’m fortunate to have been able to work with

    Professor Gillian Mead, a UK expert on life afterstroke. She has inspired me to pursue my areas ofresearch and to widen my research portfolio, so that

    I have gained invaluable experience utilising a wide

    variety of research methodologies.

    I’m an Occupational Therapy Lecturer currently in the

    closing stretches of a part time PhD. I am interested

    in researching various aspects of life after stroke,currently my main focus is on the process of identifying

    a delirium in the acute stages of stroke.

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    My recent research focused oninvestigating the involvement ofcerebrovascular dysfunction in thepathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease,

    and potential therapeutic strategiesfor the disease. In particular I focusedon the role of hypertension in thepathophysiology of Alzheimer’sdisease, and the mechanisms by whichanti-hypertensive drugs may conferprotection against cognitive decline.

     I also have interests in the impact of stress-inducedmetabolic d isease upon Alzheimer’s disease. This

    experience is invaluable in my current teaching on

    a wide range of courses within Dietetics, Nutritionand Biological Sciences.

    I was taught at undergraduate level by severalinspiring lecturers, who sparked my interest in

    undertaking research, and introduced me to a team

    of enthusiastic researchers. I enjoyed the laboratoryexperience I obtained at undergraduate level and

    was lucky to be able to embark on a PhD which

    cemented my interests.

    Following completion of my BSc (Hons) in Biological and Health Sciences at Queen Margaret University, I undertook a PhD in neuroscience at

    Queen Margaret University, in collaboration with researchers in Cognitive

    and Neural Systems at the University of Edinburgh.

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    I completed my ProfessionalDoctorate last year exploringthe theme of partnershipbetween young “expert”patients and health careproviders. As a maturestudent I value education andhave extended my researchinterests into this area.

    I am passionate about the student experience.

    My own experiences as a mature learner at Queen

    Margaret University through the Masters andDoctorate programmes have been positive ones

    and I want to ensure this continues in both our

    undergraduate and post graduate programmes.

    My inspiration was predominantly the client group

    with whom I worked and a motivation to enhanceservice delivery. I was hugely supported by Dr

    Shona Cameron my Director of Studies and my

    academic colleagues.

    I’m Dr Kath MacDonald. I’m a Senior Lecturer and a registered

    Nurse. I worked for many years in the Health Service as a Clinical

    Nurse Specialist with young people with a long term condition 

    and it is this work that has inspired my research.

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    I’m Dr Alison Strang, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for

    International Health and Development at Queen Margaret University.

    I hate seeing people excludedand marginalised. This is reected

    in my work with communitiesaffected by conict and disaster,

    as well as refugees and asylumseekers. I use qualitative methodsto explore the ways people makesense of their own lives, andcommunicate ndings with service

    providers and policymakers.

    Sometimes this involves developing a conceptual model,

    other times a practical tool. I get most satisfaction when

    I see that research leads to changes in practice! I amclosely involved in policy and practice through leading

    the humanitarian online ‘Mental Health and Psychosocial

    Support Network’, and ‘New Scots: Integrating Refugees inScotland’s Communities’ strategy.

    I was rst inspired by Dr Eunice Belbin, my rst employer,

    who was a pioneer woman researcher in the 1950s. She

    and her husband developed the inuential ‘Belbin Team

    Roles’ management model. She taught me to believe inmyself, trust my instincts and keep going until I could see

    the impact of my efforts.

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    I am Dr Pelagia Koufaki and I am research trained (PhD)

    as a Clinical Exercise Physiologist.

    For the last 15 years I havebeen conducting clinicalresearch focusing on theeffectiveness of exerciseand physical activityinterventions as therapeuticmodalities for optimizing

    functional independenceand reducing cardiovascularhealth risks in people withlong term cardiometabolicconditions such as kidney

    and cardiac disease.

    My ultimate aim is to develop and evaluate approaches that

    people are more likely to implement in their daily lives eitherin clinical or community based settings. Exercise during

    renal dialysis, is an example of effective implementation of

    a therapeutic treatment, that brings about multiple health

    benets for people who need them the most.

    I was trained to become a PE teacher or a sports coach.However, as a 3rd year student, I attended a week-long seminar

    on Cardiac Rehabilitation, which although not a novel idea,

    was not a widely recommended/known practice. When I grewup, a common piece of doctor’s advice for people with health

    conditions was to “rest”, “slow down” or “take it easy” and I

    was therefore inspired by the clinical application of the idea,that you do not have to be in perfect health to safely perform

    physical exercise. That was the beginning of my interest in

    health enhancing exercise applications and has been sustainedby interacting with the actual people who need it the most.

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    This research questioned theassumption that young children were

    sufciently active for health andhighlighted that there were severalquestions regarding how we accuratelymeasure physical activity behaviour inthis population. My research thereforestemmed from an interest to try andaddress these questions and propose aprotocol for accurately measuring thephysical activity behaviour ofyoung children at a population level,using accelerometers.

    This research is important for understanding

    physical activity behaviour of young children. Inaddition, it is only through accurate quantifcation of

    physical activity behaviour that the effectiveness ofinterventions to change physical activity behaviourcan be determined.

    My PhD supervisor Professor John Reilly wasan inspiration, with his research into childhood

    obesity and the development of physical activity

    behaviour in children. John’s research has focusedon interventions for the prevention of child and

    adolescent obesity and the consequences of obesity

    and low levels of physical activity in children andadolescents globally. This research highlighted that

    from an early age children were at risk of health

    problems as a consequence of low levels of physicalactivity and high levels of sedentary behaviour.

    I’m Dr Jane Hislop, I’m a Physiotherapy Lecturer who has a researchinterest in measurement of physical activity. When I star ted my part-timePhD research I was interested in the factors which were contributing to

     the childhood obesity epidemic and I came across Professor John Reilly’s

    research in the area of physical activity of preschool children.

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    My work examines how healthsystems and health workersrespond to the demands of globalhealth initiatives in tuberculosis(TB) and HIV care. Often, clinicaleffectiveness of new diagnostictechnologies or treatmentregimens may not translate intotheir ‘workability’ in settingswhere health workers face severeshortages of resources, and alack of training, supervision, andadequate incentives. 

    I’m a Medical Anthropologist who has been working in

    international public health settings for nearly 15 years

     – most recently in India and South Africa.

    As an anthropologist working on strengtheninghealth systems with government and non-

    governmental organizations, my aims are to

    analyse, document, and ensure that local healthworkers’ experiences and voices are heard

    and adequately taken account of in TB and HIV

    programming.

    I have experienced the challenges of delivering

    health care in resource-poor countries rst-hand;

    my parents worked in international public health

    in diverse settings and I retain vivid impressionsfrom these formative years. Additionally, excellent

    guidance received later from Professors MargaretLock and Barbara McPake inspired me to pursue a

    critical yet humane path of public health research,grounded in the subjective experiences of health

    providers and communities.

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    My projects have included work on

    articulatory settings in bilingual

    speakers, speech planning and verbal

    reaction time protocols.

    I’ve been curious about language and

    speech for as long as I can think, and

    the equipment we have available here at

    Queen Margaret University takes things

    one step further. Not only can I nd out

    how things work when we speak, I can

    investigate aspects of speech productionthat are normally hidden from view (for

    example movements of the tongue).

    When I rst started studying in Munich leading roles

    were mostly occupied by men, and looking at the

    few research active women it very much seemed an

    academic career was not compatible with having any

    (family) life to speak of . An exchange semester at UCL

    London drastically changed my view of things.

    Here I encountered women who had managed the lot:

    be a successful researcher, a brilliant teacher, a mum...

    Professor Valerie Hazan was one of those inspirational

    gures. Somewhat more optimistic about a career

    in academia I applied for a PhD at Stirling University.

    My supervisor, Professor Vera Kempe, turned out to

    be yet another stellar example of this ‘new’ breed of

    academic women. She was adamant that you could

    and should do it all (she had her second baby a fewweeks after my viva, just to prove a point I think!).

    And so I try.

    I’m a Speech Scientist. I have degrees in both Phonetics and Psychology,

    and my research takes place in the borderland between these twodisciplines. I use phonetic methodology and instrumentation (most

    notably Ultrasound Tongue Imaging) to explore psycholinguistic topics.

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    I am Carol Brennan. My role is Reader in Consumer Policy

    and Director of the Consumer Insight Centre.

    READER, BUSINESS, ENTERPRISE AND MANAGEMENT

    I regularly conduct commissioned research. I enjoy

    working with research teams in the Consumer Insight

    Centre and engaging with policy and research staffin external organisations. The research is presented

    to colleagues at all levels of organisations and shapes

    service improvements. I appreciate researching areaswhere I have the opportunity to inuence policy which

    will enhance the consumer experience.

    The eld of consumer policy is very dynamic and

    complex with a wide range o f research opportunities.

    I regularly participate in conferences and nd many of

    the speakers inspiring. The opportunity to learn fromcolleagues in this area has inspired me to conduct

    research which will make a difference.

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    I am passionate aboutculture and diasporatourism. Now editing thebook, ‘Carnival, Culture, andTourism’ which addressesdisplaced carnivals and howthe diaspora utilises and

    merges space and identity.I am the founder of the‘Waitukubuli Culture andTourism Initiative’ launched

    in October 2014.

    I am Dr Violet V Cuffy, Lecturer in Tourism Management.

    My research focus has been on tourism education and training

    from a destination perspective, with emphasis on lifelongeducation, collaboration, and co-creation of the curriculum.

    The main objective is to educate, engage, and entertain UK born

    ‘young’ descendants of the Commonwealth of Dominica (myhomeland) on core aspects of the Dominican heritage and culture.

    Related research involves ethnographic studies and exploration ofdeveloping theories on culture and diaspora tourism among this

    second, third and fourth generation niche market.

    Waitukubuli Culture and Tourism Initiative Documentary:https://youtu.be/ru8DZhFKa1g

    Most of my siblings were teachers; so unsurprisingly my career

    began as a high school teacher. Thus, formal education and trainingin teaching and learning at an earlier stage of my professional life

    has shaped my philosophy and continued interest in the principles

    and practice of education and training. My background and personalinvolvement in the rich carnival and creole culture of the Caribbean

    married to my love for travel and tourism drives my research in the

    area of carnival, culture, and diaspora tourism.

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    Dr Rebecca Finkel is a critical Events Geographer. As part

    of the University’s “commitment to relevance, sustainability

    and championing of social change”, my research centres onidentity, social justice and events management.

    This is a shift in focus from

    my PhD exploring the role ofcultural festivals in the creativeeconomy. Events Managementis an emerging research eld,

    so I was able to identify anarea under-represented in theliterature to conduct impactfulresearch and produceinnovative outputs.

    New research is framed within conceptualisations

    of gender identity, cultural events and resistance

    to globalisation, as well as mapping human rightsand special events, currently focusing on the

    links between sex work, human trafcking and

    international sporting events.

    My inspiration is my mother, Dr Madelon Lubin

    Finkel, Professor of Clinical Public Health and

    Director of the Ofce of Global Health Education

    at Weill Cornell Medical College. A champion for

    women’s health, she has inspired me to believe inthe importance of education for achieving equality

    and making the world a better place.

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    I am Dr Marion Ellison, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Queen

    Margaret University. As the leader of a major European

    Employment Research Study in Scotland (INSPIRES) my

    aspiration is to make a difference to the lives of young people

    across Europe by anticipating the future challenges they face.INSPIRES (InnovativeSocial and EmploymentPolicies for Inclusive andResilient Labour Marketsin Europe project) isa partnership of 12other leading Europeanuniversities. Contributingto this work is of great

    personal signicance.

    I am currently co-ordinating the work of my European

    colleagues as we identify and closely evaluate innovative

    knowledge, technology and policy approaches thatimprove the resilience and active inclusion of labour

    markets for young people and other vulnerable groups

    across Europe. For more information about INSPIRESplease visit the website: http://www.inspires-research.eu

    or contact me at [email protected] 

    Throughout my research career I have been stronglymotivated by an ambition to improve the lives of

    vulnerable groups in society. In contributing to andexpanding knowledge in social policy, sociology and

    professional practice I have always been inspired by the

    belief that ‘The past we inherit, the future we build’.

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    Starting my academic careerin a positivist discipline in apositivist marketing departmentforced me to question thestatus quo and to articulatealternative perspectives,however uncomfortable. Amajor part of my work has beenconcerned with the histories,herstories and historiographiesof the public relations eld, and

    the role of communications insocietal change.

    I have written and co-edited several books, the most

    recent are: a collected volume of historical essays

    (2014), a text on sports public relations (2013) and acollection of more than 30 monographical essays on

    critical public relations (2015, in press).

    Although I was not taught by any women during

    my rst degree in English & American History at

    the University of East Anglia in the mid 1970s,

    subsequently I interviewed feminist academics,Cora Kaplan and Jacqueline Rose (while working

    at The British Council); social psychologist Hilda

    Himmelweit and sociologist Eileen Barker (while

    working at the London School of Economics)

     – they were my main role models and inspirationsfor moving into an academic career. It was their

    independence of mind and autonomy that I admired.

    Along with my colleague Dr Magda Pieczka my work since

     the early 1990s has been concerned with stimulating andextending critical perspectives in public relations andopposing the dominant functional agenda in the eld.

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    We make recognition decisionsabout faces every day — andof course we are sometimessuccessful, sometimes not.It is especially critical thateyewitnesses to crime

    make accurate recognitiondecisions. The police often askeyewitnesses to look at a faceor faces and indicate whetherthey see the perpetrator of the

    crime they witnessed.

    An incorrect decision can lead to a criminal

    remaining free to commit further crimes or an

    innocent person going to jail. Eyewitnesses play a

    key role in our criminal justice system; I strive to

    ensure the criminal justice system can obtain asaccurate and reliable eyewitness evidence

    as possible.

    A third-year undergraduate class on memory

    inspired me. I felt my memory worked prettywell but was startled to learn how often we

    remember events and people incorrectly— and shocked to learn the consequences of

    some memory errors. For example, eyewitness

    identication errors are a primary cause of

    wrongful convictions.

    My research concerns how people recognise faces and the cognitive and social factors that affect

    memory for faces.

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    First, the consumption of cultural events,specically audience perceptions of

    authenticity, consumer motivations and

    spiritual attitudes, and the relationshipbetween consumer satisfaction andevent quality. Second, the meaningand signicance of event-led urban

    regeneration. Finally, social justice andits connection to mega-events, namelyperceptions of human trafcking for

    sexual exploitation and the associated

    preventative measures.

    My work has taken place in a

    variety of national and international

    contexts and has both, a practicalapplication to events, as well

    as implications for the ongoingdevelopment of policy.

    A number of people have inspired

    me in my research career,namely research supervisors

    and colleagues, including George

    Hughes, Professor Richard Prenticeand Professor Russell Rimmer. The

    work of Dr Beatriz García has also

    been a source of inspiration.

    I am Dr Cathy Matheson, Senior Lecturer in Events Management.

    My work centres on three broad themes.

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    The development of

    theory within the elds ofentrepreneurship and strategythat accommodates thesemultiple rationalities of familyand business is a key part ofmy current research, linking tothe management, sharing andcreation of knowledge in

    a family business context.

    My research also considers the manner in which familiesact as a platform for entrepreneurial individuals and families

    who develop lots of different businesses over the years.

    My inspiration has been sheer curiosity about the subject!My initial research was in agri-business, but farms are often

    run by families. Later work involved small business, but

    again one factor was the family. Families were the drivingforce behind business but overlooked in research where

    family were regarded as something to be ‘professionalised’out of the business, despite family businesses forming the

    economic bedrock of Scotland.

    I’m Dr Claire Seaman and I’m a Reader in Enterprise and Family

    Business. I’m interested in the way in which family businesses developparallel strategies for the business, the family and the individual familymembers. This is par ticularly apparent in smaller businesses which are

    under-represented in research but economically impor tant.

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    I am specically interested in

    representation of food and cookingin television cooking shows andcookbooks today and in the past andways in which these change.In particular, I look at the connectionbetween identity, taste and socialgroups, such as class, whichdemonstrate how one group createsdistinction as opposed to the otherthrough what we eat. To me, this isfascinating, especially as it can helpunderstand why changing food habits

    can be quite a difcult task!

    Even though I decided to study socialanthropology and on a postgraduatelevel, linguistics, food has always beenin the background of my and myfamily’s interest. I had an excellent(female) doctoral supervisor, withwhom I had a chance to discuss my“cooking” research but also, how it isto be a woman in academia.

    I’m Dr Ana Tominc, and I’m a Lecturer in Gastronomy

    at Queen Margaret University. In this role, I teach and

    research about food, culture and communication.

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    It matters to me because I caredeeply about the impact thatexcessive drinking is having onScotland (costing around £3.6 bn ayear to manage).I hate the fact that the healthservice has to devote massiveresources to dealing withdrunkenness and that people endup in prison because they behaveviolently when they’re drunk. And,on a more positive note, it mattersbecause I want young people tospend their youth developing as

    people, building their knowledge,friendships and self esteem andcreating memories they’ll cherish.

    Seeing the difference our work canmean for young people inspiresme – it’s great to be part of aprocess that develops (and values)their ability to make condent,

    positive choices. And teamwork isinspiring – I love working in such afocussed way with colleagues likeDr Magda Pieczka.

    The AlcoLOLs project has enabled thousands of youngpeople to challenge Scotland’s drinking culture.  It helps

     them realise that they don’t have to get drunk to t in and

    develops the skills necessary for making condent choices.

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