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Diablo Valley College Fall 2014 HIST 120-2557 LA 118 face-to-face (3 units) October 16 to December 17, 2014 History of the United States Last time this docu- ment was updated: 11/28/2014 2:23 PM A pdf version of this document is available on the Desire 2 Learn (D2L) Course Menu. SYLLABUS/ SCHEDULE

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Diablo Valley College Fall 2014 HIST 120-2557 LA 118 face-to-face (3 units)

October 16 to December 17, 2014

History of the United States Last time this docu-ment was updated: 11/28/2014 2:23 PM

A pdf version of this document is available on the Desire 2 Learn (D2L) Course Menu.

SYLLABUS/ SCHEDULE

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

You may download this file from D2L as a pdf, but your print version might become out of date. To be sure the version you downloaded is the most cur-rent, compare the date-time stamp on page 1 of your print version to the online version. In the event of conflict between your pdf and the online ver-sion, please follow the online version. (This warning only applies to download-ed versions of this document--the online version and the pdf version on D2L will always be up-to-date.) If I change a deadline, I will notify you via D2L.

Instructor:

Mary Ann Irwin

To contact me by email, please use

the D2L mailbox for your class (that way

I know who you are).

Office Hours FO222:

F2F: Tuesdays, 1:30-2:00 pm

ONLINE: Tuesdays, 9:00-9:30 am via

CCC Confer

The REQUIRED TEXT for this class is Roark, et al., THE AMERICAN PROMISE: A History of the United States to 1877, Vol. I, 5th ed. (Boston: Bedford Books, 2011).1

Recommended Text:

Johnson, READING THE AMERICAN PAST VOL. I, 4th ed. (Boston: Bedford Books, 2009).

NOTE: PLEASE PURCHASE YOUR BOOK(S) AT THE DVC BOOKSTORE. THAT WAY YOU WILL BE SURE OF BUYING THE CORRECT

BOOK(S) AND HAVING THEM BEFORE AS-SIGNMENTS ARE DUE.

NOTE: If you buy an earlier edition, you risk encountering exam questions you cannot

answer.

1 Having the book(s) in your possession when the term begins is crucial to your success. Please consider buying the book through the Campus bookstore, and buying it in person rather than online. If you buy through the school, then you know you are getting the correct book. If you buy it in person at the bookstore, you will have the book in plenty of time to complete your first exams.

I realize that personal finances often dictate the timing of book purchases. Thus I have placed two copies of American Promise on reserve at the DVC Library.

I also give you a generous "book purchase lead time" to buy the book before the first chapter exam deadlines. I cannot extend the chapter exam deadlines any further because we have a lot to do and a finite amount of time in which to do it.

TEXTS and DOCUMENTS:

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 3

XX

A History of the United States before 1877. This course examines cultural, economic, political, and social factors ….

COURSE

OVERVIEW … and includes the experi-ences and contributions of Native American, African, Asian, Mexican/Latino and European men and women in the development of American society.

The course will cover the ori-gins, nature, and impact of

the U.S. Constitution on American history before

1877 including the political philosophies of the framers, the operation of political in-stitutions, and the rights and

obligations of citizens.

Recommended: Eligibility

for ENGL 122 or equiva-

lent . CSU, UC transfera-

ble (credit limits may ap-

ply to UC--see counselor)

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

EVALUATION

… another way of

looking at the

Information above….

xx

xx

16 multiple-choice exams (15 points each)

240 points total 378-420 A

4 essays (30 points each) 120 points total

336-377 B

4 essay peer reviews (15 points each) 60 points total 294-335

C

252-293 D

Total points possible 420 Below 252 F

Grades and a running total will be posted on D2L throughout the term. It is your responsibility to be aware of your progress in the class.

To determine your grade at any given moment: add all remaining exams to your Running Total, and com-pare your total to the grade structure above.

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 5

xx

Source: http://www.silverlock.com.au/ask-a-question-0

There are several facets to participation in this course, all of which are necessary for your success.

One of the most important: you must stay up to date on possible changes to this Syllabus/Schedule. Please know that I might modify assignments over the course of the term. Any changes will appear on the "Schedule" part of this Syllabus / Schedule (be-low), at the affected assignment/date. If I change a due date, I will notify you via the email address you have DVC for your D2L mail.

Please check that email account EVERY DAY, to ensure that I have not changed some key deadline, knowledge of which might materially affect your happiness in life!

If you are working with a DSS counselor, please let me know right away, so that we can coordinate accommodations for you.

xx

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

You must complete the assigned readings before you come to class, and then take notes during lecture. Sounds simple, I know--but we call this "student engagement," and it makes an enormous difference in student success. You must submit each of the exams and writ-ten assignments within the timeframes shown in the Schedule (Schedule begins at page 14).

Attendance:

This is a face-to-face, short-term, late-start class. That means each class meeting is im-portant. If you cannot make time for the meetings, this class is not a good fit for you. If you accrue two (2) unexcused absences over the term (the equivalent of one week’s in-struction), I will block your access to D2L. You will then have to drop yourself via WebAdvisor or risk failing the class.

Once a week has passed, you might not be able to make up the work you missed. (See my policy on late work at p. 11.)

Missing the equiva-lent of one week of in-struction will jeopard-ize your ability to pass this course. Even with a medical excuse, missing a week in a 9-week class is fatal.

Here are some general timing guidelines:

The deadline for written assignments will always be 10:00 pm.

The deadline for exams will always be 11:45 pm.

Due dates for all coursework will always be either a Monday or a Friday.

Using the American Promise Website Study Tools:

The publishers' companion website for The American Promise is:

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/roark5e/#t_747795____

Register to use the site by providing your email address and a password of your choice. Follow the system prompts thereafter.

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 7

Bedford Books organizes all of its study tools by chapter. To review Chapter 1, click on "Study by Chapter" (see the red arrow above). "Step One" gives you a chapter outline. "Step Two" provides practice multiple-choice exams, called "Self Tests."

NOTE: I will not be able to help you with the Bedford Books companion site. If you run into trouble, please contact the smart folks at Bedford Books for technical assistance:

http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/Bookbag/Profile/Contact.aspx?Display=ContactTechnicalSupport

Multiple-Choice Exams:

You will take 16 Multiple-Choice Exams consisting of 15 questions per chapter. I have thrown in the oc-casional extra credit question. This extra credit ques-tion does not change the point structure of the class. For example: if you get Question 16 right, you will get one extra point, or 16 points on a 15-point exam. If you miss only Question 16, you still get 15/15. No harm, no foul.

On the chapter exams, you get about 3 minutes per ques-tion for a total of 45 minutes per exam. You must save each answer and submit the exam for grading before your 45 minutes have run out, and be-fore the 11:45 pm deadline to complete the exam passes.

D2L will not save answers entered after your time has run out. D2L will not save an-swers entered after the exam deadline has passed. Please plan your time accordingly.

Exam Availability:

All exams are available on the first day of the term. You may work ahead if you wish. Note, how-ever, that each exam has a specific due date. If you miss an exam deadline, you might be able to take it as a makeup exam during the last week of Fall 2014. Please see my policy on late work below (p. 11).

All exams are due by 11:45 pm on Friday night. Please check D2L and this Syllabus/Schedule for deadlines on specific exams.

Taking Multiple Choice Exams on D2L: All of your exams are located on the D2L Homepage under "Assessments," and "Quizzes." Click on the exam link to open the exam. NOTE: Once you open an exam, you must finish it.

Be sure you are ready before you open any exam. You only have one chance to take each exam, so please do not open any exam unless you are prepared to complete it.

Multiple Choice Exams are set to deliver one question at a time. You may go back and review your answers if you wish. I urge you NOT to go back and change your answers (statistically, your first answer is usually correct).

You must save each answer before moving to the next question. Take your time, work carefully but efficiently, and remember to SAVE your answers as you go.

YOU CANNOT SAVE ANSWERS AFTER YOUR TIME IS UP. YOU CANNOT SAVE ANSWERS AFTER THE DEADLINE TO COMPLETE THE EXAM HAS PASSED.

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

YOUR BEST EXAM STRATEGY

Multiple-Choice Questions are word problems. Your best approach in a mul-tiple-choice exam is to read the question carefully, because each word matters, and then to eliminate wrong choices. Each wrong choice has a problem: it de-scribes something that did not happen. Usually the correct choice is correct only because there is nothing wrong with it, not because it is such a profound truth!

Some students may be tempted to search the Internet for answers to exam questions. Maybe that strategy will work for them, maybe it won't. Maybe the Internet information is accurate; maybe it isn't.

The safest source of information for exam questions is the assigned reading in your textbook.

You will submit eight written assignments in this class. Four are Blue Book Essays of at least 800 words each, worth 30 points each. The other four are Classmate Responses, short review essays of at least 300 words each, worth 15 points each. Taken all together, these assignments require you to write about 4,200 words. These written assignments account for almost half of the points possible in this class. They assesses your grasp of American history but, more importantly, they hone the critical reading, writing, and communi-cation skills that today's college graduates need to succeed in a text-saturated world.

Submitting your Blue Book Essays is a two-step process. First you will submit your Blue Book Essay to the appropriate drop-box (click on the "Assessments" link on our class homepage, then "Dropboxes"). Then you will post a copy of your essay to the appropriate D2L Discussion Board (click on "Communication" on the D2L dashboard, then "Discussions"). The copy you post to the D2L drop-box is the version that I will grade. The copy you post to the D2L discussion board is the version your classmates will read and comment upon for their Classmate Responses.

The four Classmate Responses are critical analyses of your classmates' Blue Book Essays / Discussion Board posts. After you submit a copy of your Blue Book Essay to the appropriate D2L discussion board, you will select a classmate's essay and write a thoughtful, thorough peer review based on the guidelines that I provide.

xx Feel free to work ahead: all drop-boxes and discussion boards are available now on D2L. The topics and complete instructions for writing and submitting these assignments are available now on D2L. I also provide you with a Grading Rubric for each assignment, which explains how I will grade your work. Please review the rubric BEFORE you begin writing.

Please check the Schedule (beginning at p. 14) for Blue Book Essay / Discussion Board posts and Class-mate Response due dates. You should also review my policy on late work (p. 11).

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 9

The Internet and You

Some students will be sorely tempted to copy and paste random information from the Internet into their Blue Book Essays. Maybe that strategy will work for them, maybe it won't.

Here is my rule on Internet sources in Blue Book Essays:

You may copy all the random information you want from the Internet into your Blue Book Essays, AS LONG AS OUR TEXTBOOK SAYS EXACTLY THE SAME THING. You will need to corroborate this fact with ref-erences to the appropriate American Promise pages.

If I find suspicious text in a Blue Book Essay, I will run it through Turnitin. If I find material copied from any unassigned, uncorroborated source (that is, not corroborated with specific page references to our text-book), I will give that post a score of 0.

TURNITIN.COM: You will submit your Blue Book Essays for grad-ing through the drop-boxes on D2L. These drop-boxes will run your work through Turnitin, an elec-tronic resource that compares your work to Inter-net sources and to a comprehensive database of student papers. Turnitin is an excellent program that helps students avoid unintentional plagiarism. Unintentional plagiarism results from failure to understand proper citation procedure. I provide you with multiple opportunities to check the origi-nality of your work via Turnitin before each Blue Book Essay's final deadline. For your first submission, Turnitin immediately generates an "originality report" that identifies which parts of your essay, if any, match existing sources. The first originality report is usually available within five minutes. Your originality score must be 10% or lower. If your score is higher than 10%, please revise your work and resubmit it.

The originality report makes it easy for you (and me) to ensure that you have not accidentally picked up another author’s language.

You may use an informal note style for your Blue Book Essays and Classmate Responses, identifying the appropriate pages in American Promise (your only approved source) by page number. I only need page numbers, like so:

Auctoritas non veritas facit legem. "Ancipiti plus ferit ense gula." Atqui, e lotio est. Auctoritas non veritas facit legem. Acta Non Verba. Ancipiti plus ferit ense gula. (44)

This citation tells me you found general information and a direct quote on page 44 of the textbook. Please note that Turnitin's timetable changes af-ter the first originality report. For subsequent sub-missions, Turnitin makes you wait 24 hours for the next originality report. You may continue to revise and resubmit your paper as often as you like (until the deadline), but you must wait a full 24 hours for a new originality report. The clock starts over with each new submission.

xx

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

CITING SOURCES: Citing sources is unnecessary on three occa-sions: when what you are saying is common knowledge, when you are describing personal ex-perience, and or when you are sharing personal opinion or analysis. In this class, “common knowledge” will be a difficult test: how do you know what everybody knows? "Personal experience" will be a difficult bar as well, as all of the events we are studying happened long before your birth. Analysis is al-ways welcome, of course. For everything else, I expect you to identify your source.

STEP TWO Submitting your Blue Book Essay is a two-step process. 1. Compose your Blue Book Essay in Word (.doc, .docx, .txt, or .pdf) and then upload it to the appropriate D2L Drop-box. That is the version I will grade. 2. After submitting your essay to the D2L Drop-box, please copy and paste your essay into a message on the appropriate D2L Discussion Board. This is the version your classmates will see. One of your classmates will select your essay to respond to, and you will do the same for one of your classmates.

D2L HATES THIS : INCOMPAT-IBLE DOCUMENT FILES

xxxPlease note that D2L is picky about document formats.

xxxPlease do not submit your Blue Book Essays in .odt, .wps, or other non-Word formats.

xxxI won't be able to open Blue Book Essays in non-Word formats. This means I won't be able to read your work, which means I won't be able to grade your work.

xxxIf it takes you a couple days to re-submit your Blue Book Essay in a readable format, you run the risk of incurring late penalties.

xxxSee my policy on late work, p. 11. Xx

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 11

My Policy on Late Work I: Written Assignments

I will accept late written assignments without penalty if you provide me with documentation from a medical facility confirming a medical reason for your inability to meet the deadline. Except in cases of emergency (e.g., involvement in an automobile accident), your personal medical excuse should cover at least three full days prior to the deadline, not just the last possible second for submitting the work. The penalty for submitting written work late without a personal medical excuse is 4 points for each deadline missed, recalculated each day that the assignment is late. Example: For any Blue Book Essay or Classmate Re-sponse, an assignment submitted even one minute past the 10:00 pm deadline automatically loses 4 points. An assign-ment submitted before 10 pm the next day automatically loses 8 points. An assignment submitted before 10 pm the third day automatically loses 12 points. And so on.

My Policy on Late Work II: Missed Exams

I will permit you to make up any missed exam without penalty IF you provide me with documen-tation from a medical facility confirming a medical reason for your inability to meet the deadline. Except in cases of emergency (e.g., involvement in an automobile accident), your personal medical excuse should cover at least three full days prior to the exam deadline, not just the last possible se-cond for submitting the exam.

I will permit you to make up no more than one missed chapter exam without medical excuse be-ginning Week 8 (see the Schedule). You must con-tact me during Week 8 and ask me to make the exam available to you. Please note the deadline for completing any requested makeup exam in the Schedule below. The penalty for making up a missed exam without a personal medical excuse is 35%.

NOTE: Make-up Exams are not "Do Overs."

You may not retake an exam on which you did poorly.

Put another way:

Exámenes de maquillaje no son "Do-Overs".

化妆考试不是“收购”

Макияж экзамены не являются "делаете-кадром."

Xx

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

xx

xxx

NEVER MISS A DEADLINE!

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: I take a very dim view of it.

By enrolling in this class, students agree to uphold the standards of

academic integrity described here. If you are confused, or hard-

pressed for time, or completely disenchanted, please contact me first, before you do something re-

grettable and illegal.

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 13

SIGN UP FOR REMIND101!

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

Week Beginning Monday October 13

Tues Oct 14

Weds Oct 15

Thursday October 16

FIRST DAY OF CLASS. INTRODUCTIONS. CLASS OVERVIEW. This meeting is mandatory if you wish to remain enrolled in the class.

Sat Oct 18 Last date to drop with refund / Last date to add Fall 2014 late-start class

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 15

WEEK 2

Week beginning Mon Oct 20

REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading the first two chapters in Roark this week. Links to lecture outlines below. EXAMS: You must complete exams for the first two chapters in Roark this week. WRITTEN WORK: You have one Blue Book Essay due this week. Your Essay #1 Topic (on Chapter 2) is available now.

Here is the link to the Essay #1 prompt and complete instructions: www.irwinator.com/120/db1fa14.htm

Tues Oct 21

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 1: Ancient America Before 1492 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch1.htm

RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson --A Taino Origin Story: Ramón Pané, On Taino Religious Practices --A Seneca Origin Narrative: The Woman Who Fell from the Sky --Genesis: The Christian Origin Narrative: “In the Beginning” --Aristotle on Masters and Slaves: The Politics, ca. 300 B.C.

Thurs Oct 23 CENSUS

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 2: Europeans Encounter the New World, 1492-1600 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch2.htm

RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson --The King of the Congo Writes to the King of Portugal: King Afonso and King João III, Correspondence,

1526 --Columbus Describes His First Encounter with “Indians:” The Diario of Christopher Columbus's First Voy-

age to America, 1492- 1493 --A Conquistador Arrives in Mexico, 1519- 1520: Díaz del Castillo, The Conquest of New Spain, 1632 --A Mexican Description of the Conquest of Mexico: Accounts of Conquest from the Florentine Codex --Sir Thomas More Describes New World Utopia: Utopia, 1515

Fri Oct 24

Essay #1 (Chapter 2) is due by 10:00 pm tonight.** Your Roark Chapter 1 and 2 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight. **Your Essay #1 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm Monday, October 27 (next week).

Saturday Oct 25

Last date to drop with no "W"

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

WEEK 3

Week Beginning Mon Oct 27

Your Essay #1 Classmate Response (Chapter 2) is due by 10 pm tonight. Full instructions here:

www.Irwinator.com/120/db1fa14.htm

READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. Links to lecture out-lines below. EXAMS: You must complete two exams this week.

Tuesday Oct 28

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 3: The Southern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch3.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson:

--Richard Frethorne Describes Indentured Servitude in Virginia: Letter to Father and Mother, March 20, April 2, 3, 1623

--Opechancanough's 1622 Uprising in Virginia: Edward Waterhouse, Declaration, 1622 --Francisco Pareja Instructs Spanish Missionaries about the Sins of Florida's Timucuan Indians:

Confessionario, 1613 --Sex and Race Relations: Testimony from Virginia Court Records, 1681

--Bacon's Rebellion: Nathaniel Bacon, Declaration, 1676

Thurs Oct 30

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 4: The Northern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch4.htm

RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson --The Arbella Sermon: Winthrop, A Model of Christian Charity, 1630 --Observations of New England Indians: Roger Williams, A Key into the Language of America, 1643 --Keeping Order in a Puritan Community: Suffolk County Court Records, 1671- 1673 --A Provincial Government Enacts Legislation: The Laws of Pennsylvania, 1682

--Words of the Bewitched: Testimony against Accused Witch Bridget Bishop, 1692

Fri Oct 31

Your Roark Chapter 3 and 4 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight.

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 17

WEEK 4

Week Beginning Monday Nov 3

REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. EXAMS: You must take two chapter exams this week. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: Your second Blue Book Essay is due this week. Your Essay #2 Topic (on Chapter 5) is available now. See complete instructions for writ-ing Essay #2 here:

www.Irwinator.com/120/db2fa14.htm

Tues Nov 4

OUR CLASS MEETING TODAY IS CANCELLED. PLEASE STUDY CHAPTER 5 ON YOUR OWN. YOU WILL STILL WRITE ESSAY 2 (ABOUT CHAPTER 5) AND COMPLETE THE CHAPTER 5 EX-AM. BOTH ESSAY 2 AND THE CHAPTER 5 EXAM ARE DUE ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7. LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 5: Colonial America in the Eighteenth Century, 1701-1770 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch5.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --Confessions of a Thief and Rapist: A Boston Broadside, 1768 --Poor Richard's Advice: Benjamin Franklin, Father Abraham's Speech from Poor Richard's Alma-

nac, 1757 --An Anglican Criticizes New Light Baptists and Presbyterians in the South Carolina Backcountry:

Charles Woodmason, Sermon on the Baptists and the Presbyterians, ca. 1768 --Advertisements for Runaway Slaves: South Carolina Gazette and Virginia Gazette, 1737- 1745 --A Moravian Missionary Interviews Slaves in the West Indies, 1767- 1768: Christian George An-

dreas Oldendorp, History of the Evangelical Brethren's Mission on the Caribbean Islands, 1777

Thurs Nov 6

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 6: The British Empire and the Colonial Crisis, 1754-1775 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch6.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --An Oration on the Second Anniversary of the Boston Massacre: Joseph Warren, Boston Massacre

Oration, March 5, 1772 --A Boston Shoemaker Recalls British Arrogance and the Boston Tea Party: George R. T. Hewes,

Memoir, 1834 --Daniel Leonard Argues for Loyalty to the British Empire: To the Inhabitants of the Province of

Massachusetts- Bay, 1774- 1775 --George Washington Concludes That the Crisis Has Arrived: Letters, 1774 --Edmund Burke Urges Reconciliation with the Colonies: Speech to Parliament, March 22, 1775

Fri Nov 7

Essay #2 (Chapter 5) is due by 10:00 pm tonight.** Your Roark Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight. ** Your Essay #2 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm Monday, November 10 (next week).

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

WEEK 5

Week Beginning Mon Nov 10

Your Essay #2 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm tonight. Instructions here: www.Irwinator.com/120/db2fa14.htm REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. EXAMS: You have two exams due this week.

Tues Nov 11

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 7: The War for America, 1775-1783 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch7.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --Thomas Paine Makes the Case for Independence: Common Sense, January 1776 --Letters of John and Abigail Adams: Correspondence, 1776 --George Washington Seeks Congressional Support for the Continental Army: Letter to

John Hancock, President, Continental Congress, September 24, 1776 --Boston King Seeks Freedom by Running Away to the British Army: Memoir, 1798 --Joseph Brant Appeals to British Allies to Keep Promises: Address to British Secretary of

State Lord Germain, 1776 --Message to Governor of Quebec, Frederick Haldimand, 1783

Thurs Nov 13

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 8: Building a Republic, 1775-1789 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch8.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --Richard Allen Founds the First African Methodist Church: Life, Experience, and Gospel

Labours, 1833 --Thomas Jefferson on Slavery and Race: Notes on the State of Virginia, 1782 --Making the Case for the Constitution: James Madison, Federalist Number 10, 1787 --Mercy Otis Warren Opposes the Constitution: Observations on the New Constitution,

1788 --The Rights of Man in the Age of Revolution: Declaration of the Rights of Man, 1789 --Letter from Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1789

Fri Nov 14

Your Roark Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight.

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 19

WEEK 6

Week Beginning Mon Nov 17

REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. EXAMS: You must take two exams this week. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: Your third Blue Book Essay is due this week. Your Essay #3 Topic (on Chapter 10) is available now. See complete instructions for writing Essay #3 here:

www.Irwinator.com/120/db3fa14.htm

Tues Nov 18

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 9: The New Nation Takes Form, 1789-1800 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch9.htm

RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --Why Free Government Has Always Failed: William Manning, The Key of Libberty, 1798 --A French Sugar Planter Describes the French and Saint Domingue Revolutions: A Sugar

Planter of Saint Domingue Experiences Revolution in France and Saint Domingue, 1791 --Mary Dewees Moves West to Kentucky: Journal, 1788- 1789 --Alexander Hamilton on the Economy: Report on the Subject of Manufactures, 1791 --President George Washington's Parting Advice to the Nation: Farewell Address to the Peo-

ple of the United States, 1796

Thurs Nov 20

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 10: Republicans in Power, 1800-1824 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch10.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --A Jeffersonian Sailmaker's Fourth of July Address: Peter Wendover, Oration, July 4, 1806 --James Hamilton's Path to Enlistment during the War of 1812: Confession, 1818 --James Forten Protests Pennsylvania Law Threatening Enslavement of Free African Ameri-

cans: Letters from a Man of Colour, on a Late Bill before the Senate of Pennsylvania, 1813 --President Thomas Jefferson's Private and Public Indian Policy: Letter to Governor William H.

Harrison, February 27, 1803 --Address to the Wolf and People of the Mandan Nation, December 30, 1806

--Meriwether Lewis Describes the Shoshone: The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1805

Fri Nov 21

Essay #3 (Chapter 10) is due by 10:00 pm tonight.**

Your Roark Chapter 9 and Chapter 10 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight.

** Your Essay #3 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm Monday, November 24 (next week).

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

WEEK 7 -- Thanksgiving Week

Week Beginning Mon Nov 24

Your Essay #3 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm tonight. Instructions here: www.Irwinator.com/120/db3fa14.htm REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading one chapter in Roark this week. EXAMS: You must complete one exam this week.

Tues Nov 25

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 11: The Expanding Republic, 1815-1840 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch11.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --David Crockett Hunts Bear in Western Tennessee: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett

of the State of Tennessee, 1834 --President Andrew Jackson's Parting Words to the Nation: Farewell Address, March 4, 1837 --Cherokees Debate Removal: John Ross, Answer to Inquiries from a Friend, 1836; Elias

Boudinot, A Reply to John Ross, 1837 --Sarah Grimké on the Status of Women: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, 1838

--David Walker Demands Emancipation: Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, 1829

Thurs Nov 27

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY – NO CLASS

Fri Nov 28

Your Roark Chapter 11 exam is due by 11:45 pm tonight.

Sun Nov 30

Last date to Drop with W

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 21

WEEK 8

Week Beginning Mon Dec 1

REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. EXAMS: You have two exams due this week.

Tues Dec 2

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 12: The New West and Free North, 1840-1860 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch12.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --The Anxiety of Gain: Henry W. Bellows on Commerce and Morality: The Influence of the

Trading Spirit upon the Social and Moral Life of America, 1845 --That Woman Is Man's Equal: The Seneca Falls Declaration: Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 --A Farmer's View of His Wife: Eliza Farnham, Conversation with a Newly Wed Westerner,

1846 --A Texan Enlists to Fight in the Mexican War: James K. Holland, Diary, 1846 --Gold Fever: Walter Colton, California Gold Rush Diary, 1849- 1850

Thurs Dec 4

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 13: The Slave South, 1820-1860 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch13.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --Madison Hemings Recalls Life as Thomas Jefferson's Enslaved Son: Interview, 1873 --Plantation Rules: Bennet Barrow, Highland Plantation Journal, May 1, 1838 --Nat Turner Explains Why He Became an Insurrectionist: The Confessions of Nat Turner, 1831 --The Proslavery Argument: James Henry Hammond, Letter to an English Abolitionist, 1845 --Hinton Helper Demands Abolition for the Good of White Southerners: The Impending Crisis

of the South, 1857

Fri

Dec 5

Your Roark Chapter 12 and 13 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight.

DVC HIST 120-2557-FA14

WEEK 9

Week Beginning Mon Dec 8

Please let me know this week if you need to make up a missed exam. You may make up no more than one (1) missed exam. You may not retake exams on which you did poorly. REQUIRED READING: You must finish reading two chapters in Roark this week. EXAMS: You must take two exams this week. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: Your fourth Blue Book Essay is due this week. Your Essay #4 Topic (on Chapter 14) is available now. See complete instructions here: www.Irwinator.com/120/db4fa14.htm

Tues Dec 9

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 14: The House Divided, 1846-1861 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch5.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson: --The Kansas- Nebraska Act: Abraham Lincoln, Speech in Peoria, Illinois, October 16, 1854 --The Antislavery Constitution: Frederick Douglass, The Constitution of the United States: Is It

Proslavery or Antislavery? 1860 --The Proslavery Constitution: Jefferson Davis, Speech before the U.S. Senate, May 1860 --A Free African American Concludes Emigration Is Necessary: Granville B. Blanks, Letter to the

Editor, 1852 --Abolitionist Lydia Maria Child Defends John Brown and Attacks the Slave Power: Corre-

spondence between Lydia Maria Child and Virginia Governor Henry A. Wise, 1859

Thurs Dec 11

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 15: The Crucible of War, 1861-1865 at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch5.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson:

--President Lincoln's War Aims: Letter to Horace Greeley, August 22, 1862; The Emancipation Proclamation, Jan-uary 1, 1863; The Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863

--A Former Slave's War Aims: Statement from an Anonymous Former Slave, New Orleans, 1863 --The New York Draft Riots: Report of the Committee of Merchants for the Relief of Colored People Suffering

from the Late Riots in the City of New York, 1863 --A Virginia Woman Confronts Union Foragers: Nancy Emerson, Diary, 1864

--General William T. Sherman Explains the Hard Hand of War: Correspondence, 1864

Fri

Dec 12

Essay #4 (Chapter 14) is due by 10:00 pm tonight.**

Your Roark Chapter 14 and 15 exams are due by 11:45 pm tonight.

**Your Essay #4 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm Monday, December 15 (next week).

Online Syllabus/Schedule, page 23

FINAL EXAM WEEK

Monday Dec 15

Your Essay #4 Classmate Response is due by 10 pm tonight.

Tues Dec 16

OUR CLASS MEETS IN OUR REGULAR CLASSROOM AT 1:00 PM

WE WILL HAVE OUR CHAPTER 16 LECTURE.

YOU WILL HAVE UNTIL 11:45 PM TONIGHT TO COMPLETE THE CH. 16 EXAM (and any requested make-up exam). NO EXCEPTIONS.

LECTURE OUTLINE: Chapter 16 "Reconstruction, 1863 - 1877" at http://www.irwinator.com/120/ch16.htm RECOMMENDED READING: Johnson:

--Carl Schurz Reports on the Condition of the Defeated South: Report on the Condition of the South, 1865 --Black Codes Enacted in the South: Mississippi Black Code, November 1865 --Former Slaves Seek to Reunite Their Families: Advertisements from the Christian Recorder, 1865 - 1870 --A Black Convention in Alabama: Address of the Colored Convention to the People of Alabama, 1867 --Klan Violence against Blacks: Elias Hill, Testimony before Congressional Committee Investigating the Ku Klux

Klan, 1871